Books

Stephen King returns to true horror in ‘Revival’

Written by ROB MERRILL,
Associated Press writer
Thursday, 13 November 2014 09:02

Remember when Stephen King announced that he was retiring? That was more than a decade and at least six books ago, and he’s done nothing but crank out best-sellers ever since.

King's latest novel — likely to be No. 1 next week — is appropriately titled “Revival,” for it marks a return to true horror for the modern master of the genre. There are no soul-sucking vampires as in “Doctor Sleep,” or speculative historical fiction about the assassination of John F. Kennedy as in “11/22/63.”

‘The Killer Next Door’ is gripping mystery

Written by OLINE H. COGDILL,
Associated Press writer
Thursday, 30 October 2014 09:53

“The Killer Next Door” (Penguin Books), by Alex Marwood

Desperation brings six people to a decaying Victorian apartment house where the tenants’ desolation pales in comparison with one neighbor’s despicable acts.

Waters' 'Paying Guests' filled with romance, sex

Written by KIM CURTIS,
AP writer
Wednesday, 24 September 2014 15:24

Fans of Sarah Waters will feel cloaked in comfy familiarity when they sink into her new novel, "The Paying Guests."

The setting is London, 1922. The post-war economy forces upper-class Frances, a single woman in her late 20s, and her mother to begrudgingly take in lodgers. The book opens with the arrival of newlyweds Len and Lilian Barber, who are solidly middle-class.

'Long Way Home' tops Nielsen's bestseller list

Written by AP Saturday, 06 September 2014 06:43

Best-selling books for the week ending Aug. 31, as tracked by Nielsen Bookscan. Listings include hardcover fiction and non-fiction as well as mass market and trade paperbacks.

Inaugural poet Richard Blanco returns to Miami in memoir

Written by The Associated Press Tuesday, 11 November 2014 05:05

In Richard Blanco's Miami, memories linger outside coffee windows and in Cuban grocery store aisles.

Barack Obama's 2013 inaugural poet grew up here, gathering experiences and stories as the son of Cuban exiles that would lay the foundation for his written work and inspire his new memoir, "The Prince of Los Cocuyos."

New book offers ‘Game of Thrones’ back story

Written by HILLEL ITALIE,
AP National Writer
Thursday, 30 October 2014 09:42

George R.R. Martin knows all the signs of Boba Fett Syndrome.

Named for the minor “Star Wars” character who fans demanded to know more about, Boba Fett Syndrome is most acute for any book or film series that has reached the level of phenomenon, when minutiae becomes major. For Martin, this has meant not just the usual demands for the next “A Song of Ice and Fire” fantasy novel (don’t ask, he’s still working on it), but constant letters and emails asking for information on everything from dragons to Aegon Targaryen’s war against the Seven Kingdoms.

Putting banned books on the reading list

Written by Lisa Neff,
Staff writer
Thursday, 18 September 2014 10:10
books

Banned Books Week 2014 provides the material for another chapter in the campaign against censorship.

A look at the new books offered this fall, fiction, non-fiction and in-between

Written by HILLEL ITALIE,
AP writer
Wednesday, 27 August 2014 07:55

So many memoirs are coming out this fall, written in so many ways.

Neil Patrick Harris, for instance, decided that his early 40s was too young for a “life” story, even for a Tony- and Emmy-winning actor. So he has completed “Neil Patrick Harris: Choose Your Own Autobiography,” in which Harris steps back into the second person to allow you to imagine yourself onstage, on television, or, in November 2006, on edge as you prepare to tell the world you’re gay. 

‘Enhanced’ e-book of ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ out

Written by The Associated Press Wednesday, 05 November 2014 13:58

Oprah Winfrey and Tom Brokaw are among the featured commentators for an “enhanced” e-book of Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird.”

The e-book was released this week by HarperCollins. It also features a 1964 radio interview with Lee, who rarely speaks to the media. The regular e-book for “To Kill a Mockingbird,” Lee’s only novel, came out in July. She had been one of the last major authors to withhold electronic rights.

What are we reading? The Publishers Weekly best-seller list

Written by The Wisconsin Gazette Thursday, 02 October 2014 11:57

HARDCOVER FICTION

1. “Edge of Eternity” by Ken Follett (Dutton Adult)

WigWords: ‘Mathematician’s Shiva’ a wryly funny 1st novel

Written by Lisa Neff,
Staff writer
Friday, 12 September 2014 04:09

Stuart Rojstaczer celebrated the publication of his debut novel in the city where he debuted, so to speak.

Rojstaczer, who was born in Milwaukee, returned to Milwaukee on Sept. 10 to talk about The Mathematician’s Shiva, his wryly funny first novel about middle-age, family, genius and the Jewish Eastern European immigrant experience after World War II.

WiGWords: Isherwood reissued

Written by Lisa Neff,
Staff writer
Wednesday, 06 August 2014 21:04

Christopher Isherwood’s A Single Man.

“Waking up begins with saying am and now.” This is the first line of Christopher Isherwood’s A Single Man, a novel that, when it first appeared in 1964, shocked many with its frank, sympathetic and moving portrayal of a gay man.