Tag Archives: vulgar

NBC News fires Billy Bush after Trump tape

NBC News has fired Today show host Billy Bush, who was caught on tape in a vulgar conversation about women with Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump before an Access Hollywood appearance.

Bush was suspended at the morning show two days after contents of the 2005 tape were reported on Oct. 7.

NBC and Bush’s representatives had been negotiating terms of his exit before the announcement.

On the tape, Bush is heard laughing as Trump talks about fame enabling him to grope and try to have sex with women not his wife.

Bush later said he was “embarrassed and ashamed.” Trump has since denied groping women.

Bush, who had been at Today for two months, is the nephew of Republican former President George H.W. Bush.

NBC made the announcement of his firing in a note from Today show top executive Noah Oppenheim to his staff. Oppenheim called Bush, who spent 15 years at Access Hollywood, “a valued colleague and longtime member of the broader NBC family. We wish him success as he goes forward.”

Bush, a 44-year-old father of three, said that he was “deeply grateful for the conversations I’ve had with my daughters, and for all of the support from family, friends and colleagues. I look forward to what lies ahead.”

The settlement with NBC did not include a non-compete clause, meaning Bush “is a free agent,” said his lawyer, Marshall Grossman. Financial terms of the deal were kept confidential.

In the 2005 tape, which was first revealed by The Washington Post, Trump discusses unsuccessfully seeking an affair with another Access Hollywood employee, Nancy O’Dell. Trump said that when he was attracted to beautiful women “I just start kissing them. It’s like a magnet.” He said that when you’re a star, women let you.

“Grab them by the p—-. You can do anything,” Trump added.

The two men discussed an actress who was waiting from at the end of the bus ride. When they got off, Bush urged the woman to hug Trump and added, “how about a little hug for the Bushy?”

Trump said in the second presidential debate that he never did any of the actions heard on the tape, which he described as locker room talk. But a number of women have since come forward and said that Trump had surprised them in the past by groping or unexpectedly kissing them on the lips.

In an interview with CNN, Trump’s wife, Melania, said that her husband was “egged on” by Bush in the conversation.

“I wonder if they even knew the mic was on,” Melania Trump said, referring to her husband and Bush. She said they were involved in “boy talk, and he was led on — like egged on — from the host to say dirty and bad stuff.”

Asked to comment, Grossman said, “I thought that Donald Trump would claim that he was not on the bus.”

 

Why did Republicans wait until now to dump Trump?

Why now? And why this? For the legion of Republicans who abandoned Donald Trump on Saturday, recoiling in horror from comments their party’s White House nominee made about using his fame to prey on women, there is no escaping those questions.

For months, they stomached his incendiary remarks about Mexicans, Muslims, prisoners of war, a Gold Star military family and a Hispanic judge, along with offensive statements about women too numerous to count. Democratic critics argue that their silence — or the promise to vote for Trump, but not endorse him — amounted to tacit approval of misogyny and racism.

There were no good answers Saturday, and few Republicans attempted to offer any.

Some, including House Speaker Paul Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, didn’t say anything at all about the top of the party’s ticket. A steady stream of others revoked their endorsements or called for Trump to drop out of the race, condemning the New York billionaire in emailed statements and carefully crafted tweets.

Those fleeing from Trump may ultimately say it was the shock of hearing and seeing the businessman’s crudeness on video that prompted them to finally walk away. On Friday, The Washington Post and NBC News both released a 2005 recording of Trump describing attempts to have sex with a married woman. His words were caught on a live microphone while talking with Billy Bush, then a host of “Access Hollywood.”

Some may draw a distinction between Trump’s outrageous earlier comments about women, minorities and others by noting that this time, the businessman wasn’t just being offensive — he was describing actions that could be considered sexual assault. In the video, Trump is heard saying that his fame allows him to “do anything” to women.

“Grab them by the p—-. You can do anything,” he says.

But with a month until Election Day, and early voting already underway in several states, the truest answer to why Republicans are dropping Trump now — and why they’re dropping him over this — is likely political.

During the Republican primary, GOP officials worried that disavowing Trump would alienate his supporters and hurt the party in congressional races. In the general election, Trump’s crass behavior also seemed easier for Republicans to tolerate when stacked up against Democrat Hillary Clinton, a candidate so reviled by many in the GOP that virtually nothing Trump did seemed worse than the prospect of her becoming president.

But these new revelations come at a time when the White House race seems to be slipping away from Trump. He’s been unable to attract support beyond that offered by his core backers. His performance in the first debate was undisciplined and he followed it up by tangling with a beauty queen whom he shamed two decades ago for gaining weight.

“There were people who were just starting to feel like this ship was going down and now this gives people a good excuse to jump off,” said Katie Packer, a Republican strategist who advised Mitt Romney’s 2012 campaign and led an unsuccessful effort to prevent Trump from becoming the GOP nominee.

While some Republicans expressed astonishment and dismay over Trump’s 2005 comments, those who steadfastly refused to endorse him throughout the campaign suggested their party knew full well what they were getting with the brash real estate mogul and reality TV star.

“Nothing that has happened in the last 48 hours is surprising to me or many others,” said Ohio Gov. John Kasich, who was critical of Trump when he ran against him in the primary and has remained so for months.

Privately, even Republicans who didn’t formally revoke their support for Trump conceded there was little he could do to right his campaign at this point. Early voting is already underway in some key states and the comments aired in the video will likely be unforgivable with independent women, a constituency Trump desperately needs to win if he has any hope of beating Clinton.

The last hope now for many Republicans is that an unimaginable election year will still end with the GOP in control of the Senate. New Hampshire Sen. Kelly Ayotte and Nevada Rep. Joe Heck, both locked in tight races, joined the parade of officials Saturday who said they simply couldn’t stand by Trump anymore.

For Ayotte, the move earned her no quarter from her Democratic opponent, New Hampshire Gov. Maggie Hassan.

“She has had one example after the next of Donald Trump’s despicable words and his despicable behavior as reasons that she should have disavowed him,” Hassan said. “It took her until now when the revelation of his comments from a decade ago were made to decide that politically she couldn’t stand with him anymore.”

Look for more of the same in races nationwide. Democrats made clear Saturday they would spend the next month trying to ensure they and other Republicans get no credit for walking away now.

Ryan disinvites Trump from event, ‘sickened’ by tape of Trump vulgarities

Republicans on Friday grappled with a bombshell 2005 audiotape published by The Washington Post in which Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump boasted in vulgar terms about trying to have sex with an unnamed married woman and groping women, saying “when you’re a star, they let you do it.”

The disclosure threatens Trump’s already shaky standing with women.

Trump’s leaked comments spurred a flood of indignation and came at what some have seen as a potentially pivotal point. Sunday’s presidential debate, a town hall-style event, is seen as critical as Trump tries to rebound from a dip in some opinion polls after a rocky performance in the first debate with Hillary Clinton.

“No woman should ever be described in these terms or talked about in this manner. Ever,” said Reince Preibus, chairman of the Republican National Committee.

House Speaker Paul Ryan, the top Republican elected official, said he was “sickened” by the comments and said Trump would not attend a campaign event in Wisconsin with him on Saturday.

“I hope Mr. Trump treats this situation with the seriousness it deserves and works to demonstrate to the country that he has greater respect for women than this clip suggests,” Ryan said in a statement

Trump in a statement shrugged off the leaked tape as “locker room banter, a private conversation that took place many years ago.”

In the recorded conversation, Trump was wearing a microphone and chatting on a bus with Billy Bush, then host of NBC’s “Access Hollywood,” ahead of a segment they were about to tape.

“I did try and f**k her. She was married,” Trump said. “I moved on her like a b**ch, but I couldn’t get there.”

Trump talked about his attraction to beautiful women. “I just start kissing them,” he said.

“And when you’re a star they let you do it,” he said.

“Grab them by the p**sy. You can do anything.”

Trump, who has brought up former President Bill Clinton’s infidelities as a criticism of Hillary Clinton, calling her a “total enabler,” responded to the audio.

“Bill Clinton has said far worse to me on the golf course – not even close. I apologize if anyone was offended,” Trump said.

“Access Hollywood” confirmed the video in its own report, saying it discovered the comments in its library.

Billy Bush, in a statement to Variety, said he was “embarrassed and ashamed” of his comments.

Jeb Bush, the former Florida governor who lost to Trump in the Republican presidential primaries — and who is a cousin to Billy Bush – tweeted that the comments were “reprehensible.”

Mitt Romney, who was the Republican candidate in the 2012 election – and who has long opposed Trump, said his comments were “vile degradations” that “demean our wives and daughters and corrupt America’s face to the world.”

 

 

 

Restroom research: Study examines bathroom graffiti by men, women

A new article published in Gender, Place & Culture examines how men and women express themselves in the seemingly private and anonymous spaces of public bathrooms.

Texts or drawings in the bathroom stalls, while created in a private space and presumably during a very private moment, are meant to be public — transmitting ideas, images and even responses.

Using data collected in 10 university bathroom stalls, the study examines differences in communication patterns in women’s and men’s bathroom stalls through an analysis of graffiti content and style.

The research indicated that that while communication patterns tend to be supportive and relationship-focused in women’s bathrooms, the graffiti in men’s bathroom walls are replete with sexual content and insults.

In addition, an analysis of the response-and-reply chains suggests that, in the bathroom stalls, hierarchies of power are established and reinforced even in anonymous, unmoderated spaces, and even when no humans are physically present.

The first major study of bathroom graffiti was produced by Alfred Kinsey in the 1950s, which found that many wall inscriptions were highly sexual, but sexuality was defined quite differently among men and women. Men’s bathroom graffiti centered on sexual acts and sexual organs, women’s graffiti referred to love and relationships in non-erotic terms.

Further studies in the 1970s and 1980s suggested that women’s graffiti was becoming more sexual and political.

In the latest study, 60 years on from Kinsey’s work, Pamela Leong, an assistant professor of Sociology at Salem State University, monitored graffiti in 10 single sex bathrooms.  Leong found that women were more prolific, accounting for 70 percent of graffiti, and male graffiti was what she characterized as overtly sexual, crude, competitive and aggressive.

She characterized female graffiti as less sexually explicit — messages were more relationship oriented, confided private thoughts and feelings, as well as messages of support to fellow writers. She also said women often referred to bowel movements, indicating a need to discuss such things privately for fear of being judged “dirty” or “unfeminine,” a contrast to social acceptance of male lavatorial behavior.

British ambassador sorry for derogatory Falklands War tweet

Britain’s ambassador to Chile has apologized for a Twitter message that indirectly referred to a vulgar chant questioning the bravery and sexual orientation of Argentines who fought in the Falklands War.

Ambassador Jon Benjamin says the tweet was meant to be private. He referred to, without actually repeating, a chant heard in Chile’s stadiums that calls Argentines gays and fools for losing the brief but bloody war that Argentina and Britain fought 30 years ago over the South Atlantic archipelago.

“Which are the islands that were taken from whom for being what?” Benjamin tweeted to his nearly 10,000 followers ahead of Chile’s World Cup qualifying match against Argentina on Tuesday. In the actual chant, the “whom” is a vulgar word for homosexuals and the “what” is a vulgar term for lazy cowards.

Benjamin, an avid soccer fan, is also known for defending gay rights in Chile and has ran a rainbow flag up the embassy’s flagpole next to the Union Jack. The ambassador often tweets on topics that range from Chilean politics and international affairs to his backstage encounters with celebrities like The Rolling Stones.

“I’m sorry to have offended with a DM private message that I published by mistake,” Benjamin tweeted after erasing the original message. “I have a great affection for my Argentine friends and respect their national team.”

Benjamin will not refer to the incident any further, said Marianne Becker, a spokeswoman for the British Embassy in Santiago.

“There’s nothing else to add from what is publicly known,” Becker said. “The ambassador made public a message that should have been private (DM) and when he realized this, he retracted and offered an apology.”

The war over the islands known in Spanish as the Malvinas claimed the lives of 649 Argentines and 255 British soldiers. Argentina continues to claim the territory.