Tag Archives: vote

Trump prevails in Electoral College vote, protesters respond

Republican Donald Trump prevailed in Electoral College voting on Dec. 19 to officially win election as the next president, easily dashing a long-shot push by detractors to try to block him from gaining the White House.

Trump, who is set to take office on Jan. 20, garnered more than the 270 electoral votes required to win, even as at least half a dozen electors broke with tradition to vote against their own state’s directives, the largest number of “faithless electors” seen in more than a century.

The Electoral College vote is normally a formality but took on extra prominence this year after a group of Democratic activists sought to persuade Republicans to cross lines and vote for Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton. She won the nationwide popular vote even as she failed to win enough state-by-state votes in the acrimonious Nov. 8 election.

Protesters disrupted Wisconsin’s Electoral College balloting.

Also, in Austin, Texas, about 100 people chanting: “Dump Trump” and waving signs reading: “The Eyes of Texas are Upon You” gathered at the state capitol trying to sway electors.

In the end, however, more Democrats than Republicans went rogue, underscoring deep divisions within their party.  At least four Democratic electors voted for someone other than Clinton, while two Republicans turned their backs on Trump.

With nearly all votes counted, Trump had clinched 304 electoral votes to Clinton’s 227, according to an Associated Press tally of the voting by 538 electors across the country.

“I will work hard to unite our country and be the president of all Americans,” Trump said in a statement responding to the results.

The Electoral College assigns each state electors equal to its number of representatives and senators in Congress. The District of Columbia also has three electoral votes. The votes will be officially counted during a joint session of Congress on Jan. 6.

When voters go to the polls to cast a ballot for president, they are actually choosing a presidential candidate’s preferred slate of electors for their state.

‘FAITHLESS ELECTORS’

The “faithless electors” as they are known represent a rare break from the tradition of casting an Electoral College ballot as directed by the outcome of that state’s popular election.

The most recent instance of a “faithless elector” was in 2004, according to the Congressional Research Service. The practice has been very rare in modern times, with only eight such electors since 1900, each in a different election.

The two Republican breaks came from Texas, where the voting is by secret ballot. One Republican elector voted for Ron Paul, a favorite among Libertarians and former Republican congressman, and another for Ohio Governor John Kasich, who challenged Trump in the race for the Republican nomination.

Republican elector Christopher Suprun from Texas had said he would not vote for Trump, explaining in an op-ed in the New York Times that he had concerns about Trump’s foreign policy experience and business conflicts.

On the Democratic side, it appeared to be the largest number of electors not supporting their party’s nominee since 1872, when 63 Democratic electors did not vote for party nominee Horace Greeley, who had died after the election but before the Electoral College convened, according to Fairvote.org. Republican Ulysses S. Grant had won re-election in a landslide.

Four of the 12 Democratic electors in Washington state broke ranks, with three voting for Colin Powell, a former Republican secretary of state, and one for Faith Spotted Eagle, a Native American elder who has protested oil pipeline projects in the Dakotas.

Bret Chiafalo, 38, of Everett, Washington, was one of three votes for Powell. He said he knew Clinton would not win but believed Powell was better suited for the job than Trump.

The founding fathers “said the electoral college was not to elect a demagogue, was not to elect someone influenced by foreign powers, was not to elect someone who is unfit for office. Trump fails on all three counts, unlike any candidate we’ve ever seen in American history,” Chiafalo said in an interview.

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‘GREAT ANGST’

Washington’s Democratic governor, Jay Inslee, said after the vote that the Electoral College system should be abolished. “This was a very difficult decision made this year. There is great angst abroad in the land,” Inslee said.

Twenty-four states have laws trying to prevent electors — most of whom have close ties to their parties — from breaking ranks.

In Maine, Democratic elector David Bright first cast his vote for Clinton’s rival for the party nomination, Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, who carried the state in the party nominating contest. His vote was rejected, and he voted for Clinton on a second ballot.

In Hawaii, one of the state’s four Democratic electors cast a ballot for Sanders in defiance of state law binding electors to the state’s Election Day outcome, according to reports from the Los Angeles Times and Honolulu Star-Advertiser newspapers.

In Colorado, where a state law requires electors to cast their ballots for the winner of the state’s popular vote, elector Michael Baca tried to vote for Kasich – but was replaced with another elector.

In Minnesota, one of the state’s 10 electors would not cast his vote for Clinton as required under state law, prompting his dismissal and an alternate to be sworn in. All 10 of the state’s electoral votes were then cast for her.

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Trump wins presidency with lowest minority vote in 40 years

Donald Trump won the U.S. presidency with less support from black and Hispanic voters than any president in at least 40 years, a Reuters review of polling data shows, highlighting deep national divisions that have fueled incidents of racial and political confrontation.

Trump was elected with 8 percent of the black vote, 28 percent of the Hispanic vote and 27 percent of the Asian-American vote, according to the Reuters/Ipsos Election Day poll.

Among black voters, his showing was comparable to the 9 percent captured by George W. Bush in 2000 and Ronald Reagan in 1984. But Bush and Reagan both did far better with Hispanic voters, capturing 35 percent and 34 percent, respectively, according to exit polling data compiled by the non-partisan Roper Center for Public Opinion Research.

And Trump’s performance among Asian-Americans was the worst of any winning presidential candidate since tracking of that demographic began in 1992.

The racial polarization behind Trump’s victory has helped set the stage for tensions that have surfaced repeatedly since the election, in white supremacist victory celebrations, in anti-Trump protests and civil rights rallies, and in hundreds of racist, xenophobic and anti-Semitic hate crimes documented by the Southern Poverty Law Center, which tracks extremist movements.

The SPLC reports there were 701 incidents of “hateful harassment and intimidation” between the day following the Nov. 8 election and Nov. 16, with a spike in such incidents in the immediate wake of the vote.

Signs point to an ongoing atmosphere of confrontation.

The Loyal White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, a white separatist group that vilifies African-Americans, Jews and other minorities, plans an unusual Dec. 3 rally in North Carolina to celebrate Trump’s victory.

Left-wing groups have called for organized protests to disrupt the president-elect’s Jan. 20 inauguration.

And a “Women’s March on Washington,” scheduled for the following day, is expected to draw hundreds of thousands to protest Trump’s presidency.

American politics became increasingly racialized through President Barack Obama’s two terms, “but there was an attempt across the board, across the parties, to keep those tensions under the surface,” says Jamila Michener, an assistant professor of government at Cornell University.

Trump’s anti-immigrant, anti-Muslim rhetoric “brought those divisions to the fore; it activated people on the right, who felt empowered, and it activated people on the left, who saw it as a threat,” she added.

That dynamic was evident last week.

When Vice President-elect Mike Pence attended the Broadway musical “Hamilton” in New York on Friday, the multi-ethnic cast closed with a statement expressing fears of a Trump presidency. A far different view was on display the next day as a crowd of about 275 people cheered Trump’s election at a Washington conference of the National Policy Institute, a white nationalist group with a strong anti-Semitic beliefs.

“We willed Donald Trump into office; we made this dream our reality,” NPI President Richard Spencer said. After outlining a vision of America as “a white country designed for ourselves and our posterity,” he closed with, “Hail Trump! Hail our people! Hail victory!”

DIVISION BREEDS CONFRONTATION

Though Trump’s election victory was driven by white voters, his performance even among that group was not as strong as some of his predecessors. Reagan and George H.W. Bush both won the presidency with higher shares of the white vote than the 55 percent that Trump achieved.

The historical voting patterns reflect decades of polarization in American politics, but the division surrounding Trump appears more profound, says Cas Mudde, an associate professor specializing in political extremism at the University of Georgia. These days, he adds, “people say they don’t want their children even to date someone from the other party.”

Indeed, voters’ opinions of those on the opposite side of the partisan divide have reached historic lows. Surveys by the Pew Research Center showed this year that majorities of both parties held “very unfavorable” views of the other party — a first since the center first measured such sentiment in 1992.

And the lion’s share of those people believe the opposing party’s policies “are so misguided that they threaten the nation’s well-being,” the center found.

That level of division has spurred activists on both sides of the political divide to take their activism in a more confrontational direction.

In the wake of Trump’s victory, protesters on the left took to the streets by the thousands in cities across the country, in some cases causing property damage.

Much of the agitation was motivated by a belief that Trump’s administration will foster racism and push the courts and other political institutions to disenfranchise minority voters, says James Anderson, editor of ItsGoingDown.Org, an anarchist website that has promoted mass demonstrations against Trump’s presidency, including a call to disrupt his inauguration.

Meanwhile, John Roberts, a top officer in the Ku Klux Klan affiliate planning the December rally to celebrate Trump’s election, says the group is committed to non-violent demonstrations, but he sees Trump’s election as likely to bring a new era of political conflict. And much of the strife, he says, will be centered around racial divisions.

“Once Trump officially takes office, there is going to be a boiling over at some point in time,” Roberts says. “Who knows when that’s going to be, but it’s not going to be pretty.”

After the vote: Meet tomorrow with resolve, determination

Throughout our nation’s history, we’ve faced devastating setbacks in our pursuit of a more perfect union. But even in the darkest of moments, Americans have summoned the courage and persistence to fight on. The results of tonight’s presidential election require us to meet tomorrow with the same resolve and determination.

This is a crucial moment for our nation and for the LGBTQ movement.

The election of a man who stands opposed to our most fundamental values has left us all stunned. There will be time to analyze the results of this election, but we cannot afford to dwell. We must meet these challenges head on.

Over the last 18 months, Donald Trump and Mike Pence have intentionally sowed fear and division for cynical political purposes. They now face a decision about whether they will also govern that way. We hope, for the sake of our nation and our diverse community — which includes women, people of color, those with disabilities, immigrants, and people of all faiths and traditions — they will choose a different path.

For our part, HRC will continue our fight for equality and justice for all with greater urgency and determination than ever before. We must. Lives literally depend on it.

Despite the outcome of this presidential race, we know that the tide has irreversibly turned in favor of LGBTQ equality. Today, we draw strength from the vast majority of Americans who believe that our lives and rights are worth fighting for. Thanks to you and your tireless work, we deployed the largest get out the vote effort in our organization’s history. In North Carolina, it appears we have defeated the hateful Governor Pat McCrory and helped elect Roy Cooper to repeal HB2. We were proud to support Hillary Clinton, and she made history as the most pro-equality candidate to ever run for president of the United States.

The defeats we have suffered tonight demonstrate that our future victories will require us to dig deeper and work harder to continue bending the moral arc of the universe toward justice and equality. We must fight to protect our progress, and to limit the damage that Donald Trump has promised.

To every LGBTQ person across this nation feeling stunned and disheartened, and questioning if they have a place in our country today, I say this: You do. Don’t ever let anybody tell you otherwise. Be bold, be strong, and continue to stand up for the principles that have always made America great.

At a time like this, we don’t slow down. We double down. Tomorrow, HRC will set to work once again, undeterred and focused on our mission to realize a world in which every single LGBTQ person is safe and equal and valued.”

WHERE THEY STAND: A checklist of Clinton, Trump on issues

By now, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump have taken a stab at all sorts of issues and an actual stand on many.

Election Day won’t settle what gets done over the next four years — only who gets to try. Nearly all their ideas require Congress to go along, a tall order.

Even so, they’ve presented voters with distinct choices and sketched out the opening act for an administration that will be engaging lawmakers across the policy landscape.

A checklist of where the Democratic and Republican candidates stand on a selection of issues:

ABORTION: Nominate Supreme Court justices who support abortion rights?

CLINTON: Yes

TRUMP: No

CHILD CARE

CLINTON: 12 weeks of government-paid family and medical leave. Double the child tax credit for families with children 4 and younger, to $2,000 per child.

TRUMP: 6 weeks of leave for new mothers, with the government paying wages equivalent to unemployment benefits. New income tax deduction for child care expenses, other tax benefits and a new rebate or tax credit for low-income families.

CLIMATE CHANGE

CLINTON: $60 billion to switch to cleaner energy. Maintain Obama administration commitment to cut emissions of heat-trapping gasses by up to 30 percent by 2025.

TRUMP: Calls attempts to remedy global warming “a very, very expensive form of tax.” Previously called global warming a hoax.

DEBT

CLINTON: Tax increases on wealthy would help pay for programs, but the extra revenue would not go to bringing down the debt.

TRUMP: Promises massive tax cuts, without proposing curbs in expensive benefit programs; analysts forecast debt would rise more than under Clinton.

EDUCATION

CLINTON: Universal pre-kindergarten within 10 years, to be achieved by giving money to states.

TRUMP: $20 billion in first year to help states expand school choice.

EDUCATION-COLLEGE

CLINTON: Government-paid tuition at in-state, public colleges for students from families making less than $85,000. Income threshold to rise to $125,000 by 2021.

TRUMP: Cap student loan payments at 12.5 percent of a borrower’s income, with loan forgiveness if they make payments for 15 years.

ENERGY

CLINTON: Generate enough renewable energy to power every home in U.S. within 10 years. Measured support for hydraulic fracturing.

TRUMP: “Unleash American energy” by stripping regulations to allow unfettered production of oil, coal, natural gas and other sources. Rescind Clean Power Plan, an Obama administration strategy to fight climate change.

FOREIGN POLICY

CLINTON: Sees international partnerships as essential for using U.S. influence and lessening chances of war.

TRUMP: “America First” policy means alliances and coalitions would not pass muster unless they produced a net benefit to the U.S.

GUNS

CLINTON: Renew ban on assault-type weapons, ensure background checks are completed before a gun sale goes forward, mandate such checks for gun-show sales and repeal law that shields gun manufacturers from liability.

TRUMP: Nominate Supreme Court justices who favor Second Amendment gun rights; says public safety is enhanced by gun ownership.

HEALTH CARE

CLINTON: Build on Obama health care law, with federal spending to help with rising out-of-pocket costs. Repeal a tax on generous coverage that was instituted to help pay for the law’s benefits.

TRUMP: Seek to repeal the law and replace it. Studies say his plan would make up to 20 million uninsured.

IMMIGRATION

CLINTON: Provide a path to citizenship, not just legal status, for many people in the country illegally. Expand programs that protect some groups of immigrants from deportation, including those who arrived as children and parents of U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents.

TRUMP: Deport people in the country illegally who have committed serious crimes, build a wall along Mexico border at Mexico’s expense. No longer proposing to deport all who are illegally in the U.S., but has not proposed steps to give them legal status.

INFRASTRUCTURE

CLINTON: Spend $250 billion over next five years on public infrastructure and direct an additional $25 billion to a new infrastructure bank to help finance local projects.

TRUMP: Has said he would double Clinton’s infrastructure spending, financing with bonds.

IRAN: Support the deal freezing Iran’s nuclear development program in exchange for relief of international sanctions?

CLINTON: Yes

TRUMP: No

ISLAMIC STATE MILITANTS

CLINTON: Mostly would stay the course from the Obama administration.

TRUMP: Vows relentless bombing; has expressed support for outlawed interrogation techniques.

JOBS

CLINTON: Spend more on roads, tunnels, and other infrastructure. Make government-paid tuition available to most students, enabling more Americans to qualify for higher-paying jobs.

TRUMP: Cut taxes and regulation to spur hiring. Vows manufacturing revival through restrictive practices on imports and improved business climate.

MINIMUM WAGE

CLINTON: At least $12 an hour, from the current $7.50.

TRUMP: $10.

REFUGEES

CLINTON: Expand Syrian refugee program to let in as many as 65,000 over an unspecified time. About 10,000 came in first year of program.

TRUMP: Halt the Syrian refugee program; “extreme” vetting of arrivals from places known for extremism.

SOCIAL SECURITY

CLINTON: Expand benefits for widows and family caregivers, require wealthy people to pay Social Security taxes on more of their income

TRUMP: No cuts to Social Security.

TAXES

CLINTON: Tax increases for the wealthy, such as minimum 30 percent tax on incomes over $1 million and higher taxes on big inheritances. Little if any change for other taxpayers.

TRUMP: Collapse the seven income tax brackets, which peak at 39.6 percent, into three, with a top rate of 33 percent. Slice corporate income tax and eliminate estate tax. Analysts say the wealthy would benefit disproportionately. Tax Policy Center says middle fifth of taxpayers could save an average of $1,010.

TRADE

CLINTON: Opposes Trans-Pacific trade deal, after championing the agreement as secretary of state. Mixed record of support and opposition to free trade.

TRUMP: Impose hefty tariffs on countries judged to be trading unfairly, a step that would suppress their exports and increase costs of goods imported into U.S. Renegotiate or withdraw from North American Free Trade Agreement. Opposes Trans-Pacific trade deal.

WALL STREET REGULATION

CLINTON: More.

TRUMP: Less.

Pot-legalization movement seeks first foothold in Northeast

Having proven they can win in the West, advocates for recreational marijuana hope the Nov. 8 election brings their first significant electoral victories in the densely populated Northeast, where voters in Massachusetts and Maine will consider making pot legal for all adults.

Supporters believe “yes” votes in New England would add geographical diversity to the legalization map, encourage other East Coast states to move in the same direction and perhaps build momentum toward ending federal prohibitions on the drug.

“We have to get to a point where we can win legalization voter initiatives in other parts of the country,” said Keith Stroup, founder of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, or NORML, a leading group in the legalization movement.

Three other states — California, Arizona and Nevada — are also voting on recreational pot. If the California initiative passes, marijuana will be legal along the entire West Coast. Washington, Oregon, Colorado and Alaska have already voted to permit it. The District of Columbia also passed a legalization measure in 2014, but it has no regulatory framework for retail sales and possession remains illegal on federal property.

Several Eastern states are among the 25 that already allow some form of medicinal marijuana, but none in the region has approved recreational pot.

Big money is at stake, which helps explain why marijuana supporters have raised more than $6 million in Massachusetts and about $1.3 million in Maine, most from outside those states.

Analysts from Cowen and Co. issued a report last month forecasting a $50 billion legal cannabis market in the U.S. by 2026, a nearly tenfold increase over today. But such growth would be predicated on federal legalization. Passage of the November state referendums would be a “key catalyst” toward that end, analysts wrote.

Higher marijuana usage in the West may help explain why the region has been a more fertile ground for legalization, said Matt Simon, New England director for the Marijuana Policy Project, another major pro-legalization group.

“More people have direct experience with marijuana or know someone who has, and that leads to it being demystified,” Simon said.

Recent polls on the New England ballot questions, which propose significantly lower tax rates than those in Colorado and Washington, indicate the “yes” sides trending ahead in both states. Still, passage is far from guaranteed.

In Massachusetts, a socially liberal state, voters previously decriminalized small amounts of marijuana and approved it for medicinal use. This year’s initiative has met formidable opposition from politicians, business leaders, clergy and even billionaire casino magnate Sheldon Adelson, who recently donated $1 million to opposing groups.

The state’s popular Republican Gov. Charlie Baker and Boston’s Democratic Mayor Marty Walsh are among many elected officials fighting the idea. Their arguments include concerns that edible pot products resembling candy or other treats could fall into the hands of children, and that marijuana can be a “gateway” to far more dangerous drugs.

“The availability of marijuana for adolescent users already constitutes an environmental factor for the later use of other illicit drugs,” the state’s four Roman Catholic bishops said in a recent statement. “Its legalization will only serve to worsen this problem.”

A TV ad urging a “no” vote imagines a neighborhood overrun by pot shops and a mother shocked to see her own son emerge from one of the stores. Legalization proponents dismissed the ad as a “smear-and-fear” tactic.

“There is a puritanical streak that runs through New Englanders,” said NORML’s Stroup, a onetime Boston resident.

The Puritans lost their influence centuries ago, and the phrase “banned in Boston” is an anachronism. Yet uneasiness persists when it comes to issues that would have once been considered sinful. Massachusetts, for example, only recently authorized casino gambling and did so in a limited and highly regulated form.

In Maine, critics worry about disrupting the state’s well-established medical marijuana program.

“We want to make sure patients don’t lose access and that small growers will still be able to flourish,” said Catherine Lewis, director of education for Medical Marijuana Caregivers of Maine.

Portland, the state’s largest city, legalized possession of up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana in 2013, but the statewide prohibition still makes buying and selling the drug illegal.

Marijuana companies that have focused largely on Western states are watching developments closely, sensing new regional opportunities for investment and growth.

“The Northeast specifically is going to be a very powerful market because of the population density,” said Derek Peterson, chief executive of Terra Tech Corp., which operates cannabis cultivation, production and retail facilities.

Marc Harvill, client services and training manager for Denver-based Medicine Man Technologies, said the firm has already fielded inquires for consulting services from potential retail operators in New England should the ballot questions pass.

“The sky’s the limit,” he said.

Kids count: Hillary Clinton wins K-12 vote

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is the winner of the presidential contest among students in grades K-12.

Approximately 153,000 students across the country cast their ballots in the 2016 Scholastic News Student Vote.

Clinton  received about 52 percent  of the student vote while Republican candidate Donald Trump received 35 percent.

Thirteen percent of student voters wrote in “other” choices.

Write-in votes were cast for Libertarian Party candidate Gary Johnson (2 percent), U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders (1 percent, and Green Party candidate Jill Stein (1 percent).

Students also voted for “Mom,” Kanye West, Harambe the gorilla, Spider-Man and “bacon.”

Votes in the 2016 Scholastic News Student Vote were cast by students in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Since 1940, the outcome of the Scholastic News Student Vote has mirrored the results of every presidential election, except two: Thomas E. Dewey versus Harry S. Truman in 1948 and John F. Kennedy versus Richard M. Nixon in 1960.

Students who voted for Clinton explained their decisions:

  • “I voted for Hillary because she will be the first woman president. Hillary is showing all women young or old you can do anything.” sixth-grade student in Arizona.
  • “Hillary will make good decisions and do good things for America. She has the experience.” fourth-grade student in New York.

Students who voted for Donald Trump stated:

  • “I would choose Trump because he would be good for business.” fifth-grade student in Georgia.
  • “I voted for Donald Trump because he says that he will make America great again.” sixth-grade student in Arizona.

Scholastic News Student Vote results from key states: 

  • ColoradoClinton 59% Trump 28% Other 14%
  • Florida: Clinton 48% Trump 39% Other 13%
  • Iowa: Clinton 41% Trump 42% Other 17%
  • Michigan: Clinton 49% Trump 36% Other 15%
  • Nevada: Clinton 59% Trump 28% Other 13%
  • New Hampshire: Clinton 50% Trump 31% Other 18%
  • North Carolina: Clinton 49% Trump 40% Other 11%
  • Ohio: Clinton 43% Trump 42% Other 15%
  • Pennsylvania: Clinton 48% Trump 41% Other 10%
  • Virginia: Clinton 50% Trump 37% Other 13%
  • Wisconsin: Clinton 46% Trump 40% Other 14%

“In this unprecedented and contentious presidential race, students have made their voices heard by casting their votes in our mock election for president,” said Elliott Rebhun, Editor-in-Chief of Scholastic Classroom Magazines.

He continued, “The Scholastic News Student Vote is the culmination of a year of coverage in our classroom magazines and Scholastic News online, bringing the election to classrooms nationwide to inform students about the electoral process and the positions taken by the candidates on complex issues — from immigration and the economy to the environment. Our job at Scholastic is to support teachers with age-appropriate content that not only engages students and teaches them about the democratic process, but also helps them think critically about the issues.”

On the Web

To see the full results, visit www.scholastic.com/vote.

 

Poll: Political parties lacking appeal for young Americans

Most young Americans say the Republican and Democratic parties don’t represent them, a critical data point after a year of ferocious presidential primaries that forced partisans on both sides to confront what — and whom — they stand for.

That’s according to a new GenForward poll that shows the disconnect holds true across racial and ethnic groups, with just 28 percent of young adults overall saying the two major parties do a good job of representing the American people.

The poll shows that despite this across-the-board feeling of disenchantment with the two-party system, the Democratic Party holds a clear advantage in appealing to young people of color.

More than two-thirds of young adults, including vast majorities of young Asian-Americans, Hispanics and blacks, say the Republican Party does not care about people like them.

Democrats fare a bit better among young people overall, with a small majority — 53 percent — saying the party cares about people like them. Among young African-Americans, Hispanics and Asian-Americans, most believe the party does care about people like them.

Among young whites, majorities say both parties don’t care much about them, including 58 percent who say that of the Republican Party and 52 percent who say it about the Democratic Party.

GenForward is a survey by the Black Youth Project at the University of Chicago with the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

The first-of-its-kind poll pays special attention to the voices of young adults of color, highlighting how race and ethnicity shape the opinions of a new generation.

The results of the survey of Americans age 18-30 reflect something of an identity crisis for both parties heading into the future, driven in part by deep antipathy toward the presidential candidates they nominated.

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton, the two least-popular presidential nominees in the history of modern polling, were opposed by large and bitter swaths of their parties.

Young people aren’t certain to fall in line behind the nominees, the survey found.

Three-quarters of young adults say the billionaire real estate magnate is unqualified to be president even after he vanquished 16 GOP rivals.

Half say the same of Clinton, a former senator and secretary of state, after unlikely rival Bernie Sanders forced her to fight for the nomination for a year.

But for all the disenchantment, young adults across racial and ethnic groups are mostly unfamiliar with their alternatives.

Seven in 10 say they don’t know enough about Libertarian presidential candidate Gary Johnson to have an opinion about him, and nearly 8 in 10 say the same about Green Party candidate Jill Stein.

The 18-30 age group tends not to be a conservative constituency, so the survey contains critical data particularly for Democrats and Clinton, who has said she knows she has “work to do” to appeal to the young people who flocked to Sanders during the primary.

Young people across racial and ethnic groups were more likely to support Sanders than Clinton in their primary battle this spring, and among young Sanders supporters, less than half — 43 percent — say they’ll support Clinton against Trump in the fall election.

Three percent say they’ll support Trump, with the rest saying they’re undecided, will vote for a third-party candidate or will not vote.

The poll of 1,940 adults age 18-30 was conducted July 9-20 using a sample drawn from the probability-based GenForward panel, which is designed to be representative of the U.S. young adult population. The margin of sampling error for all respondents is plus or minus 3.8 percentage points.

The survey was paid for by the Black Youth Project at the University of Chicago, using grants from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Ford Foundation.

Respondents were first selected randomly using address-based sampling methods, and later interviewed online or by phone.

 

On the web

GenForward polls: http://www.genforwardsurvey.com/

Black Youth Project: http://blackyouthproject.com/

AP-NORC: http://www.apnorc.org/

At the DNC: Day 3 with Obama, Kaine and Kravitz

In Philadelphia, Democrats say the stakes this election are a choice between building walls and tearing people down or an optimistic unifying vision where everyone has a role to play in building our future. The July 27 program includes remarks from President Barack Obama, Tim Kaine and many others.

The program, as provided by the DNCC, includes:

4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (EDT)

Call to Order
U.S. Rep. Marcia Fudge (Ohio)

Invocation
Rev. William Byron

Pledge of Allegiance
Monroe Handy

National Anthem
Sebastien De La Cruz

Vice Presidential Nomination 

Remarks
Daniel Driffin
HIV/AIDS Activist from Georgia

Remarks
Neera Tanden
President of the Center for American Progress Action Fund

Remarks
U.S. Representative Sheila Jackson Lee (Texas)

Remarks
U.S. Representative Michelle Lujan Grisham (New Mexico)

Remarks
U.S. Representative Eleanor Holmes Norton (District of Columbia)

Remarks
U.S. Representative Adam Schiff (California)

Remarks
U.S. Representative Maxine Waters (California)

Remarks
President of NARAL Ilyse Hogue

Remarks
Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum

Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus
Chair, U.S. Representative Judy Chu (California)

Remarks
Brooks Bell
Brooks is a young female tech entrepreneur from North Carolina

Remarks
New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio

In Memoriam
Introduced by Convention Chair U.S. Representative Marcia Fudge (Ohio)

6:00 – 10:00 PM (EDT)

Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee
Chair, U.S. Representative Ben Ray Luján (New Mexico)

Our America Musical Performance 

Remarks
Civil Rights Leader Reverend Jesse Jackson

Remarks
Actress Star Jones

Remarks
Flint Mayor Karen Weaver

Congressional Black Caucus
Chair, U.S. Representative GK Butterfield (NC)

Remarks
President of EMILY’s List Stephanie Schriock

Remarks
Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid (Nevada)

Remarks
California Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom

Remarks
U.S. Representative Ruben Gallego (Arizona)

Remarks
Jamie Dorff
Jamie’s husband was Patrick Dorff, an Army helicopter pilot from Minnesota who died while on a search and rescue mission in northern Iraq. As a senator, Hillary worked with Republicans and Democrats to increase the gratuity paid to family members of fallen veterans from $12,000 to $100,000.

Remarks
Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan

Remarks
Former Governor of Maryland Martin O’Malley

Introduction of Film
Actress Sigourney Weaver

Remarks
California Governor Jerry Brown

Remarks
Director Lee Daniels

Remarks
Christine Leinonen, Brandon Wolf and Jose Arraigada
Christine Leinonen is the mother of Christopher “Drew” Leinonen, who was killed in the Pulse attack in Orlando. Brandon Wolf and Jose Arraigada are survivors of the attack at the nightclub in Orlando. 

Remarks
U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (Connecticut)

Remarks
Erica Smegielski
Erica’s mother Dawn was the principal of Sandy Hook Elementary and was killed while trying to protect her students. Since then, Erica has become an outspoken advocate for commonsense gun violence prevention measures. 

Remarks
Former Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey

Remarks
Actress Angela Bassett

Remarks
Felicia Sanders & Polly Sheppard
Felicia and Polly are two of the three survivors of the Mother Emanuel Church shooting in Charleston, SC.

Remarks
Gabby Giffords & Mark Kelly

Musical Performance

Remarks
Rear Admiral John Hutson (Ret. USN)

Remarks
Kristen Kavanaugh
Kristen Kavanaugh is a graduate of the United States Naval Academy and a former Marine Corps Captain who deployed to Iraq. She later co-founded the Military Acceptance Project, a California-based social justice organization dedicated to promoting acceptance of marginalized populations within the military. 

Remarks
Former Congressman and Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta

Remarks
U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown (Ohio)

Introduction of Speaker
Dr. Jill Biden

Remarks
Vice President Joe Biden

Remarks
Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed

Remarks
Michael Bloomberg

Musical Performance
Lenny Kravitz

10:00 – 11:00 PM (EDT)

Remarks
Democratic Nominee for Vice President Tim Kaine

Introduction of Film
Sharon Belkofer
Sharon Belkofer is the mother of fallen Lt. Col. Thomas Belkofer. Her son was killed when a suicide bomber detonated a minibus in a convoy carrying Belkofer and three other high-ranking officers in Kabul, Afghanistan. 

Remarks
President Barack Obama

Benediction
Rev. Gabriel Salguero

Judge: Wisconsin residents lacking photo IDs can vote in November

A federal district court judge says Wisconsin residents lacking photo identification can vote in the November general election.

The judge issued an order to that effect on July 19.

The preliminary injunction issued by U.S. District Judge Lynn Adelman, based in Milwaukee, allows people who haven’t been able to obtain IDs to vote, provided they sign an affidavit stating why they couldn’t get identification.

However, Adelman says there isn’t enough time before state’s Aug. 9 primary to implement the option to sign an affidavit.

The judge’s order responds to a motion for an injunction filed in June by the American Civil Liberties Union and the National Law Center for Homelessness and Poverty.

Sean Young, an attorney with the ACLU’s Voting Rights Project, responded to the decision in a news release. “Wisconsin’s voter ID law has been a mistake from day one,” Young said. “This ruling is a strong rebuke of the state’s efforts to limit access to the ballot box. It means that a failsafe will be in place in November for voters who have had difficulty obtaining ID.”

The case is Ruthelle Frank et al v. Scott Walker.

On the Web

Read the ruling at the ACLU’s website.