Tag Archives: student debt

Community briefs: Wright trail, good jobs, frac forums and more

Wisconsin Gazette’s roundup of community bulletins, nonprofit announcements and other local news.

Wright in Wisconsin: Gov. Scott Walker in March recently signed Assembly Bill 512 to designate and mark a highway route as the Frank Lloyd Wright Trail.

Walker said, “It’s great to be here at Taliesin to see first-hand some of Frank Lloyd Wright’s work in Spring Green. The bill we’re signing into law will help visitors to our state easily identify and find Frank Lloyd Wright landmarks, like the one we’re at today.  Wright’s architecture is world-renowned, and these signs will boost tourism even further throughout Wisconsin.”

Gov. Scott Walker in March recently signed Assembly Bill 512 to designate and mark a highway route as the Frank Lloyd Wright Trail. — PHOTO: Wikipedia
Gov. Scott Walker in March recently signed Assembly Bill 512 to designate and mark a highway route as the Frank Lloyd Wright Trail. — PHOTO: Wikipedia

The route will run through Kenosha, Racine, Milwaukee, Waukesha, Jefferson, Dane, Iowa, Sauk and Richland counties and direct travelers the right way to Wright attractions.

The bill,  authored by Rep. Todd Novak, R–Dodgeville, and Sen. Howard Marklein, R-Spring Green, passed the Assembly with a vote of 96-2 and was concurred by the Senate on a voice vote.

Reggae for public rides

A reggae concert at Riverwest Public House on Locust in Milwaukee April 8 will raise money for the Milwaukee Transit Riders Union, an organization of bus riders fighting for better transit in the city. For more, go to transitridersunion.org.

Good work

GSAFE is seeking an executive director to begin work in July. For more about opportunities with the nonprofit, which advocates for LGBT youth and on education issues, go to gsafewi.org.

Historic Milwaukee Incorporated also is hiring. The nonprofit dedicated to increasing “awareness of and commitment to Milwaukee’s history, architecture and the preservation of the built environment” is seeking a part-time accountant. For more, go to historicmilwaukee.org.

High costs, higher ed

U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin, D-Wis., met with students at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in late March to talk about student loan debt and her reform bill, the In The Red Act. The measure would allow student borrowers to refinance debt at lower rates, increase Pell Grants to keep pace with rising costs and also would make a new investment in community college. For more, go to, baldwin.senate.gov.

Beachy clean

Milwaukee County Supervisor Marina Dimitrijevic announced the state approved an $838,000 Knowles-Nelson stewardship grant at South Shore Park to enhance the beach and boat launch and improve water quality. South Shore Park also is receiving a $100,000 grant from the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District to reconstruct the parking lot, another water quality project.

Frac forums

Sifting the Future educational events are planned on April 20 in Madison and April 21 in Eau Claire. The hills of western Wisconsin supply 75 percent of the country’s frac sand market. Organizers invite people to learn about frac sand mining impacts on Wisconsin’s ecological and agricultural landscapes. The Madison event is at 7 p.m. at UW-Madison’s Union South. The Eau Claire event is at 6 p.m. at The Plaza. For more, go to midwestadvocates.org.

Honored by ARCW

The Aids Resource Center of Wisconsin’s annual Make A Promise Dinner and Gala takes place on April 9 at the Wisconsin Center in Milwaukee. ARCW is honoring state Rep. John Nygren for “his courageous leadership addressing the heroin epidemic, opiate overdose and his long-term commitment to supporting care and treatment for people with HIV.” ARCW also will recognize BMO Harris Bank for its philanthropy and UW Health for its work specializing in providing health care to people living with HIV.

Meanwhile, ARCW also is receiving honors. The Human Rights Campaign, the nation’s largest LGBT civil rights group, recognized the nonprofit as a “Leader in LGBT Healthcare Equality.” For more, go to arcw.org.

Field fun

The Natural Resources Foundation of Wisconsin is offering 188 expert-led field trips around the state in 2016, a 25 percent increase from 2015. The program offers opportunities for all ages and abilities to explore public lands, waters and wildlife by foot, bike, boat and even train. Since 1994, nearly 40,500 people have joined the foundation on field trips. Trips take place in 46 out of 72 Wisconsin counties. For more, go to wisconservation.org.

The Cream City Foundation welcomed a new board member, Pat Galgan. — PHOTO: CourtesyThe Cream City Foundation welcomed a new board member, Pat Galgan. — PHOTO: Courtesy
The Cream City Foundation welcomed a new board member, Pat Galgan. — PHOTO: Courtesy

Cream City crew

The Cream City Foundation welcomed a new board member, Pat Galgan, and announced its slate of officers for 2016: Paul Milakovich, chair; Angelique Harris, vice chair; Erika Baurecht, vice president; Jose A. Milan, treasurer; Stewart M. Morrisey, assistant treasurer; Bridget Paskey, secretary; Renee Krinberger, chair of the fund development committee; and board members Galgan, Rob Doerfler-Eckstein and Eric M. Peterson. CCF is Southeastern Wisconsin’s LGBT community foundation. For more, go to creamcityfoundation.org.

Send community announcements to Lisa Neff at lmneff@www.wisconsingazette.com.

Millennials desire to own a business, but see less opportunity

More than half of millennials desire to start a business, but fewer are creating new businesses than previous generations did at a similar age, according to a brief from the Center for American Progress.

Generation Progress, the youth advocacy arm of the Center for American Progress, brought together young entrepreneurs from Oakland, California; New York City and Columbus, Ohio and asked them about their experiences, the challenges they have faced and what policies they would recommend to remove the barriers to starting a business.

“Millennials have the drive and desire to start their own businesses, but would-be entrepreneurs are held back by the slow economy, high student-debt levels and a complicated legal and regulatory framework,” said Sarah Ayres Steinberg, a policy analyst at the Center for American Progress and the author of the brief. “In addition, many investors and policymakers hold outdated views about who can be an entrepreneur and what constitutes entrepreneurship.”

Participants in the discussions agreed:

• High levels of student debt are one of the biggest hurdles to starting a business, confirming many experts’ view that today’s record-high student-debt levels are inhibiting entrepreneurship and broader economic growth. “My mom owned her own business for years, and I wanted to follow that path after I graduated,” one participant said. “But after taking on so much student debt, I realized it just wasn’t the right time to take on more debt.”

• Many organizations — from government agencies, to chambers of commerce, to business schools — often lack a strategic plan to support entrepreneurship that is both informed by business owners and effectively advertised to businesses.

• Traditional organizations designed to support entrepreneurs failed to understand mission-driven businesses.

• A strong and diverse entrepreneurial community was an important factor in where millennial entrepreneurs decided to locate their businesses.

To increase entrepreneurship among millennials, the issue brief recommends expanding access to early and fast capital, creating tools to navigate entrepreneurship’s legal and regulatory framework, developing mentorship communities, and allowing student borrowers to refinance their loans to a lower interest rate.