Tag Archives: speech

Secretary Kerry: Obama’s climate change targets won’t be reversed

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry made a stirring appeal on Nov. 16 to all countries — including his own — to press ahead with the fight against climate change, saying a failure to do so would be a “betrayal of devastating consequences.”

Without mentioning Donald Trump by name, Kerry’s speech at the U.N. climate talks was partly aimed at the Republican president-elect who has called global warming a “hoax” and has pledged to “cancel” the Paris deal limiting greenhouse gas emissions.

“No one has the right to make decisions that affect billions of people based solely on ideology or without proper input,” Kerry said.

With 2016 on track to be the hottest year on record, Kerry said the impacts of global warming are now evident across the world with record-breaking droughts, rising sea levels, unusual storms and millions of people displaced by weather events.

“At some point even the strongest skeptic has to acknowledge that something disturbing is happening,” he said.

The U.S. election outcome has created deep uncertainty about the U.S. role in international climate talks — and about the Paris Agreement adopted last year by more than 190 countries. But Kerry said the U.S. was already in the midst of a clean energy transition that would continue regardless of policy-making.

“I can tell you with confidence that the United States is right now today on our way to meeting all of the international targets we have set,” Kerry said. “Because of the market decisions that are being made, I do not believe that that can or will be reversed.”

The Obama administration pledged during the Paris negotiations to reduce U.S. emissions by 26-28 percent from 2005 levels by 2025.

Bill Hare, director of the Climate Analytics research group, said the U.S. in on the right path toward meeting its target “but a bit more is needed to get there.”

He said if Trump dismantles Obama policies such as the Climate Action Plan and Clean Power Plan, then U.S. emissions would stay at current levels instead of decrease.

Paul Bledsoe, a former Clinton White House climate adviser, said clean energy and efficiency investments by U.S. businesses and consumers are likely to keep American emissions falling overall.

However, he added that “most analysts believe it will take additional government policies that Trump is highly unlikely to pursue to meet the sharper emissions cuts the U.S. has pledged by 2025 under the Paris agreement.”

Kerry said an “overwhelming majority” of Americans know that climate change is happening and support the U.S. commitments under the Paris deal.

Falling short in the fight against climate change would be a “moral failure, a betrayal of devastating consequences,” he said.

Kerry said climate change shouldn’t be a partisan issue and noted that military and intelligence leaders have recognized its potential as a “threat-multiplier.”

He asked leaders in all parts of the world, “including my own,” to inform themselves about climate change by talking to scientists, economists, business leaders and other experts.

“I ask you on behalf of billions of people around the world … do your own diligence before making irrevocable choices,” he said.

Wisconsin communities vote to amend, overturn Citizens United

Wisconsin voters in 18 communities Nov. 8 voted for non-binding referenda to amend the U.S. Constitution to say that money is not the same thing as free speech and overturn Citizens United.

“People across the ideological spectrum get it: All of our voices are being drowned out by those with big money,” said Matt Rothschild, executive director of Wisconsin Democracy Campaign.

The questions were approved with overwhelming majorities:

• Rock County (86 percent)

• Reedsburg (86 percent)

• Manitowoc (81 percent)

• Delafield (79 percent)

• Neshkoro (88 percent)

• New Glarus (88 percent)

• Spring Valley (91 percent)

• Osceola (86 percent)

• Mt. Horeb (84 percent)

• Monticello (86 percent)

• Clayton (86 percent)

• New Glarus (83 percent)

• Harris (65 percent)

• Springdale (86 percent)

• Decatur (89 percent)

• Mount Pleasant (84 percent)

• Cadiz (87 percent)

• Lake Tomahawk (91 percent)

A total of 96 Wisconsin communities — home to 2.8 million people — have called for an amendment.

Across the country, 18 state legislatures have voted for a constitutional amendment, as well as more than 700 towns, villages, cities and counties.

Jeanette Kelty, a leader of the amendment movement in Green County, said the morning after the election, “We are extremely pleased that these referenda passed by such high margins. This clearly demonstrates the will of the people. It is time for our state representatives to put this resolution to a statewide vote, and to move towards sending a resolution from Wisconsin to the U.S. Congress.”

Four in five Americans oppose the U.S. Supreme Court’s Citizens United v. FEC decision, according to a Bloomberg poll. A New York Times/CBS poll.

“Big money has absolutely corrupted our system of government of, by, and for the people,” said Gerry Flakas of Delafield, another activist involved in the amendment push. “The only solution is to amend the Constitution to clarify that money is not speech and a corporation is not a person.”

On the Web

United To Amend is a non-partisan, grassroots movement. For more information visit wiuta.org.

Supporters march on Philly as Sanders readies for speech

Bernie Sanders is set to address the Democratic National Convention on its opening night in Philadelphia.

Early on July 25, day one of the party’s four-day political celebration, a sea of Sanders supporters marched on Philadelphia, crossing the Ben Franklin Bridge from New Jersey into Pennsylvania.

The protest took place with Philadelphia under a heat wave, with temperatures in the high 90s.

“Bernie electrified this party,” said activist Henry Carrington of Philadelphia. “And of course we’re going to come together here. That’s what the protesting is partly about. We’ve got something started. Let’s get it done.”

After the march, some assembled at the Pennsylvania Convention Center.

There, demonstrators shouted, “This is what democracy looks like” as convention goers visited with representatives from an array of progressive, Democratic-leaning groups promoting gun control, reproductive freedom, immigrant rights, clean energy, girl power and more.

Delegates joined in with chanting. Some shouted, “Bernie, Bernie” and others shouted, “Win Hillary Win.”

The convention was to open at about 4:30 p.m. on July 25.

His campaign said Sanders will “make it clear that Hillary Clinton is by far superior to Donald Trump on every major issue from economics and health care to education and the environment.”

The campaign said the senator will stress the “most progressive platform in Democratic Party history includes agreements he reached with Clinton to dramatically expand health care access and to make public colleges tuition-free for students from families with annual incomes up to $125,000 a year.”

Also, in his remarks, Sanders plans to rip into Trump for siding with the Koch brothers and echoing fossil fuel industry claims that climate change is a hoax despite the virtually unanimous scientific consensus that the warming planet is causing devastating harm.

Additionally, Sanders will send a message to the convention and to the 13 million voters who supported him that they have begun a political revolution to transform America and that the revolution — “Our Revolution” – continues.

Clinton: Too much violence, too much hate, too much senseless killing

Hillary Clinton delivered the following remarks at the African Methodist Episcopal Church National Convention in Philadelphia.

Giving all praise and honor to God.

Thank you for that welcome, and for letting me be a part of this anniversary celebration for the AME Church. I want to thank Bishop Green as well as Bishop Bryant, Bishop White, Bishop Ingram, Bishop Young, Bishop McKenzie, Bishop Jackson, Dr. Richard Allen Lewis, Sr., Reverend Dr. Jeffery B. Cooper, Sr., Bishop Snorton, Reverend Vincent and the AME General Conference Choir, which I had the great pleasure of hearing from backstage.

There is no better place to mark this milestone for the AME Church than right here in Philadelphia, the city where this church was founded by a former slave 200 years ago.

Today, we join to celebrate your esteemed history, the leaders and congregants who built this community and kept it strong, and your legacy of service. You seek to meet what the Book of Micah tells us are the Lord’s requirements for each of us: “To do justice, love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God.”

As President Obama has said, the church is the “beating heart” of the African American community. This is the place where people worship, study, grieve and rejoice without fear of persecution or mistreatment. That is a precious thing, my friends, in this world. I know that, from my experience as a lifelong Methodist, how important my own church community has been to me.

So I come here today, first and foremost, to say thank you. Thank you for being part of this historic institution, and for carrying its work forward, as Bishop Green said. I also come tonight as a mother, and a grandmother to two beautiful little children. And like so many parents and grandparents across America, I have been following the news of the past few days with horror and grief.

On Tuesday, Alton Sterling, father of five, was killed in Baton Rouge — approached by the police for selling CDs outside a convenience store. On Wednesday, Philando Castile, 32 years old, was killed outside St. Paul — pulled over by the police for a broken tail light. And last night in Dallas, during a peaceful protest related to those killings, there was a vicious, appalling attack. A sniper targeted police officers. He said he wanted to hurt white people. Twelve officers were shot, along with two civilians. Five — five — officers have died. We now know all their names: Brent Thompson, Michael Krol, Michael Smith, Lorne Ahrens, and Patrick Zamarripa. And as I was on my way here today, we heard reports of another shooting yesterday morning in Tennessee.

What can one say about events like these? What can people and leaders of faith say about events like these? It’s hard, isn’t it, even to know where to start. But let’s start here — let’s take a moment to pray for all the families and the loved ones suffering today. For Alton’s grieving children. For the four-year-old girl who bravely comforted her mother while Philando died in front of them. For the families of those police officers who lived every day with the fear that something like this could happen, and will always be proud of their service and sacrifice.

We pray for those families, and for the souls of everyone we lost this week and in all weeks preceding. May they rest in God’s peace.

Now, there are many unanswered questions about each of these incidents. We will learn more in the days ahead. And when we know as much as we can, there must be a just accounting.

For now, let’s focus on what we already know — deep in our hearts. We know there is something wrong with our country. There is too much violence, too much hate, too much senseless killing, too many people dead who shouldn’t be. And we know there is clear evidence that African Americans are much more likely to be killed in police incidents than any other group of Americans.

And we know there is too little trust in too many places between police and the communities they are sworn to protect. With so little common ground, it can feel impossible to have the conversations we need to have, to begin fixing what’s broken. We owe our children better than this. We owe ourselves better than this.

No one has all the answers. We need to find them together. Indeed, that is the only way we can find them. Those are the truest things I can offer today. We must do better, together. Let’s begin with something simple but vital: listening to each other. For Scripture tells us to “incline our ears to wisdom and apply our hearts to understanding.”

The deaths of Alton and Philando are the latest in a long and painful litany of African Americans killed in police incidents — 123 so far this year alone. We know the names of other victims, too:

Tamir Rice.

Sandra Bland.

Walter Scott.

Dontre Hamilton.

Laquan McDonald.

Eric Garner.

Michael Brown.

Freddie Gray.

Brandon Tate-Brown, whose mother Tanya is here today, and who was killed not far from here a year and a half ago.

Tragically, we could go on and on, couldn’t we. The families of the lost are trying to tell us. We need to listen. People are crying out for criminal justice reform. Families are being torn apart by excessive incarceration. Young people are being threatened and humiliated by racial profiling. Children are growing up in homes shattered by prison and poverty.

They’re trying to tell us. We need to listen.

Brave police officers are working hard every day to inspire trust and confidence. As we mourn the Dallas police officers who died and pray for those wounded, let’s not forget how the Dallas Police Department in particular has earned a reputation for excellence. They’ve worked hard for years to improve policing and strengthen their bonds with the community. And they’ve gotten results.

Police officers across the country are pouring their hearts into this work, because they know how vital it is to the peace, tranquility, justice, and equality of America. They’re trying to tell us. And we need to listen.

People are crying out for relief from gun violence. We remember Reverend Clementa Pinckney, eight congregants at Mother Emanuel in Charleston — and thousands more killed every year by guns across our nation. Things have become so broken in Washington that to just try to get a vote on compromise gun safety reforms, John Lewis himself had to stage a sit-in on the floor of the House of Representatives.

Gun violence is ripping apart people’s lives. They’re trying to tell us. And we need to listen.

I know that, just by saying all these things together, I may upset some people. I’m talking about criminal justice reform the day after a horrific attack on police officers. I’m talking about courageous, honorable police officers just a few days after officer-involved killings in Louisiana and Minnesota. I’m bringing up guns in a country where merely talking about comprehensive background checks and getting assault weapons off our streets gets you demonized.

But all these things can be true at once. We do need police and criminal justice reforms, to save lives and make sure all Americans are treated equally in rights and dignity. We do need to support police departments and stand up for the men and women who put their lives on the line every day to protect us. And we do need to reduce gun violence. We may disagree about how to do all these things, but surely we can all agree with those basic premises. Surely this week showed us how true they are.

Now, I have set forth plans for over a year to reduce excessive violence, reform our sentencing laws, support police departments that are doing things right, make it harder for the wrong people to get their hands on guns. For example, there are two important steps that I will take as president.

First, I will bring law enforcement and communities together to develop national guidelines on the use of force by police officers. We will make it clear for everyone to see when deadly force is warranted, and when it isn’t. And we will emphasize proven methods for de-escalating situations before they reach that point.

And second, let’s be honest — let’s acknowledge that implicit bias still exists across our society and even in the best police departments. We have to tackle it together, which is why in my first budget, I will commit $1 billion to find and fund the best training programs, support new research, and make this a national policing priority. Let’s learn from those police departments like Dallas that have been making progress, apply their lessons nationwide.

Now, plans like these are important. But we have to acknowledge that — on their own — they won’t be enough. On their own, our thoughts and prayers aren’t enough, either. We need to do some hard work inside ourselves, too.

Today, there are people all across America sick over what happened in Dallas, and fearful that the murders of these police officers will mean that vital questions raised by Alton’s and Philando’s deaths will go unanswered. That is a reasonable fear. Today, there are people all across America who watched what happened in Dallas last night and are thinking, no frustration with the police could ever justify this bloodshed. How did we get here? And is there more to come? That’s a reasonable fear, too..

It is up to all of us to make sure those fears don’t come true. We cannot, we must not vilify police officers. Remember what those officers were doing when they died. They were protecting a peaceful march. They were people in authority, making sure their fellow citizens had the right to protest authority. And there is nothing more vital to our democracy than that. And they died for it.

Ending the systemic racism that plagues our country — and rebuilding our communities where the police and citizens all see themselves as being on the same side — will require contributions from all of us. White Americans need to do a better job of listening when African Americans talk— talk about the seen and unseen barriers you face every day. We need to try, as best we can, to walk in one another’s shoes — to imagine what it would be like if people followed us around stores, or locked their car doors when we walked past. Or if every time our children went to play in the park, or went for a ride, or just to the store to buy iced tea and Skittles, we said a prayer — “Please, God — please, God — don’t let anything happen to my baby.”

And let’s put ourselves in the shoes of police officers, kissing their kids and spouses goodbye every day and heading off to a dangerous job we need them to do. When gunfire broke out yesterday night, and everyone ran to safety, the police officers ran the other way — into the gunfire. That’s the kind of courage our police and first responders show every single day somewhere across America. And let’s remember — let’s think about what Dallas Police Chief David Brown said this morning. He said, “Please join me in applauding these brave men and women, who do this job under great scrutiny, under great vulnerability, who literally risk their lives to protect our democracy.” He went on to say, “We don’t feel much support most days. Let’s not make today most days.”

Let’s remember that — not just today but every day.

Let’s ask ourselves, what can I do? What can I personally do to stop violence and promote justice? How can I show that your life matters to me? That I have a stake in your safety and wellbeing?

Elie Wiesel, who died last week, once clarified for us that “the opposite of love is not hate — it’s indifference. And the opposite of life is not death — it’s indifference.” None of us can afford to be indifferent toward each other — not now, not ever. And I’m going to keep talking about these issues with every audience. And if I’m elected, I’ll start working on this on day one — and keep at it every single day after that.

I want you to know the 24-hour news cycle moves on — I won’t. This is so important to who we are, what kind of nation we are making for our children and our grandchildren. As President Obama said yesterday, and as we all know in our hearts to be true: We are better than this. And if we push hard enough, and long enough, we can bend the arc of history toward justice. We can avoid that choice that Dr. King posed for us between chaos and community.

So yes, this is about our country. It’s also about our kids. There’s nothing more important than that. And I think it’s about our faith. We have a lot of work to do. We don’t have a moment to lose. But I would not be here tonight if I did not believe we can come together with a sense of shared purpose and belief in our shared humanity, and if I did not know we must, because truly we are stronger together. Not separated into factions or sides; not shouting over each other about who matters more or who has more cause to be upset; but together, facing these challenges together. And if we do this right and have the hard conversations we need to have, we will become even stronger — like steel tempered by fire.

Fierce debates are part of who we are — just like freedom and order, justice and security — complementary values of American life. They are not easy. They challenge us to dig deep, and constantly seek the right balance. But in the end, if we do that work, we will become a better nation. If we stand with each other now, we can build a future where no one is left out or left behind, and everyone can share in the promise of America — which is big enough for everyone, not to be reserved for a few.

But we know something — we know that work is hard, don’t we? I’m calling on this historic church, and all of our churches, to think hard about what special role you can play. Every day, you teach and show us about the Golden Rule and so much else. Why can’t we really believe in and act on it? To treat others as we would want to be treated.

In the 13th chapter of First Corinthians, St. Paul extols the virtues of faith, hope, and love for our fellow human beings. He says we need them all in this life, because of our imperfections: we “see through a glass darkly” and only “know in part.” He proclaims love the greatest virtue, necessary to keep faith and hope alive and to give us direction.

I’ve tried to say for some time now that our country needs more love and kindness. I know it’s not the kind of thing presidential candidates usually say. But we have to find ways to repair these wounds and close these divides. The great genius and salvation of the United States is our capacity to do and to be better. And we must answer the call to do that again. It’s critical to everything else we want to achieve — more jobs with rising income; good education no matter what ZIP code a child lives in; affordable college; paying back debts; health care for everyone. We must never give up on the dream of this nation.

I want to close with a favorite passage — a passage that you all know — that means a great deal to me and I’m sure to many of you, from Galatians. “Let us not grow weary in doing good” — “for in due season, we shall reap, if we do not lose heart.”

My friends, let us not grow weary. Let us plan the path forward for all of God’s children. There are lost lives to redeem, bright futures to claim. Let us go forth — go forward, Bishop — with a sense of heartfelt love and commitment. And may the memory of those we’ve lost light our way toward the future our children and grandchildren deserve.

Thank you, AME, and God bless you.

Scott Walker says he’ll speak at GOP convention

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker says he’ll speak at the Republican National Convention.

Walker told WKOW-TV after an event in Platteville that he’s agreed to speak at the GOP gathering in Cleveland July 18-21.

RNC spokesman Alee Lockman told WKOW the schedule is still being finalized.

Walker acknowledged he’s now rejecting the idea that Donald Trump could be replaced as the nominee.

The governor said two weeks ago that he believed delegates should be free to vote their consciences. But he told WKOW a vote for anyone other than Trump is a “de facto vote” for Hilary Clinton, the presumptive Democratic nominee for president.

The governor, who’s been the subject of Trump attacks, said he would put them aside for the good of the country.

Walker’s campaign spokesman didn’t immediately respond to a request for details on his speech.

On July 6, organizers announced session times for the July 18-21 convention to be attended by about 50,000 people — just 5,000 of them delegates.

“Planning is in its final stages with only 12 days remaining until the gavel falls here in Cleveland signaling the start of the 2016 Republican National Convention,” said convention cEO Jeff Larson.

Each session will feature a slate of votes and speakers. Start times are

• Monday, July 18, 1 p.m.

• Tuesday, July 19, 5:30 p.m.

• Wednesday, July 20, 7 p.m.

• Thursday, July 21, 7:30 p.m.

On the record: Quotes from the news (or non news)

“I believe that the church not only should apologize to the person who is gay whom it has offended but has to apologize to the poor, to exploited women, to children exploited for labor; it has to ask forgiveness for having blessed many weapons.”

— POPE FRANCIS in a groundbreaking statement on June 26.

“I think you can call this the cautious generation.”

— BILL ALBERT, spokesman for the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, responding to a government survey showing U.S. teens are having a lot less sex, are drinking and using drugs less often and aren’t smoking as much.

“The way in which much of the EU debate was shaped was based on the idea of ‘ordinary people’ being threatened by ‘the other,’ meaning people who don’t look like you.”

— DAVID GILBORN, a race relations expert at the University of Birmingham, pointing to the racist and xenophobic factors underlying the United Kingdom’s vote to leave the European Union. Many political experts say the “Brexit” movement reflected the mindset of Donald Trump’s followers.

“I’d seriously like to congratulate FOX News for keeping their entire audience from knowing that GW Bush set the Iraq withdrawal date.”

— Comedian JOHN FUGELSANG in a tweet.

“The problem is — the problem has always been — that feminism is not fun. It’s complex and hard and it pisses people off. It’s serious because it is about people demanding that their humanity be recognized as valuable.”

— ANDI Zeisler, writing about what she calls “marketplace feminism” in the new book We Were Feminists Once.

“For the gays out there — ask the gays and ask the people — ask the gays what they think and what they do in, not only Saudi Arabia, in many of these countries, with the gay community, just ask, and then you tell me — who’s your friend, Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton?”

— DONALD TRUMP in a speech during which he claimed to be a greater ally to LGBT Americans than Hillary Clinton.

“Those who defend the easy accessibility of assault weapons should meet these (bereaved Orlando) families and explain why that makes sense.”

— PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA commenting on NRA-backed lawmakers who refuse to adopt any restrictions on the purchase of military assault weapons.

“As someone who has used marijuana, I do not agree with that.”

— Libertarian presidential candidate GARY JOHNSON responding to Mitt Romney’s stance against legalizing marijuana because it “makes people stupid.”

“Go f**kin make my tortilla bitch, and build that f**kin wall. For me! You’re lucky all these cops are here, bro.”

— An unidentified DONALD TRUMP SUPPORTER caught on video screaming at protesters outside a Trump rally in Phoenix.

On the record: Boehner said what?

“I have Democrat friends and Republican friends. I get along with almost everyone, but I have never worked with a more miserable son of a bitch in my life.” — Former House Speaker JOHN BOEHNER sharing his feelings about GOP presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz in a talk hosted by Stanford University. Boehner referred to Cruz as “Lucifer in the flesh.”

“Nothing is more stunning than having the words ‘serial child molester’ and ‘speaker of the House’ in the same sentence.”

— JUDGE THOMAS DURKIN in sentencing former House Speaker Dennis Hastert to 15 months in federal prison for paying hush money to a man he allegedly abused. Prosecutors allege Hastert molested at least four boys during his time as a wrestling coach in west suburban Chicago.

“We’re just thrilled that Andrew Jackson has had a removal of his own. The constant reminder of Andrew Jackson being glorified is sad and sickening to our people.”

— Country singer/songwriter BECKY HOBBS commenting on the U.S. Treasury’s decision to replace Jackson, who owned slaves and displaced Native Americans from their land, with African-American abolitionist Harriet Tubman on the face of the $20 bill.

“Prince was very proudly black and a lot of the music that he played — you’ve got to remember the rock ‘n’ roll that some people said that was the ‘white’ side — no, rock ‘n’ roll was black music. Funk is black music. Ballads is black music. Prince was playing music that was true to his soul and true to his core.”

— STEPHEN HILL, president of programing for Black Entertainment Television, talking about Prince’s legacy as an African-American entertainer.

“I’ve never seen such a combo of simplistic slogans and contradictions and misstatements in one speech.”

— Former Secretary of State MADELINE ALBRIGHT assessing Donald Trump’s foreign policy vision, which he laid out in a speech in Washington.

“If Hillary Clinton were a man, I don’t think she’d get 5 percent of the vote. The only thing she’s got going is the woman’s card and the beautiful thing is, women don’t like her.”

— DONALD TRUMP in a speech following his five-state win April 26.

“The other day, Mr. Trump accused me of playing the woman card. Well, if fighting for women’s health care and paid family leave and equal pay is playing the woman card, then deal me in.”

— HILLARY CLINTON responding to Donald Trump’s critique of her on the campaign trail.

“This seems to be a solution in search of a problem.”

— Fox News host CHRIS WALLACE sharing his assessment of North Carolina’s so-called “bathroom bill,” which essentially prevents transgender people from using public restrooms.

Quotes from the news: Ron Johnson said what?

“The big takeaway from last night: The Republican machine in Wisconsin that Scott Walker and the Republican Party of Wisconsin have honed over the past four years is stronger than ever.” — U.S. SEN. RON JOHNSON in a statement about the election of Scott Walker’s hand-picked Supreme Court justice Rebecca Bradley to a 10-year term on April 5. Outside groups supporting Walker’s candidate Rebecca Bradley outspent those supporting challenger JoAnne Kloppenburg almost four to one.

“Just because he has a Hispanic last name does not mean he’s Hispanic. His mind is white.”

EDNA FERRER, a 57-year-old hairstylist in the Bronx, telling the New York Daily News that GOP presidential candidate Ted Cruz had no business visiting the majority Hispanic borough of the city. Cruz had to cancel appearances there on April 7 due to protesters.

“If you feel as though somebody is doing something wrong against you, can you just get over it?”

— GOP presidential candidate JOHN KASICH’s advice to LGBT people suffering discrimination.”

“The big takeaway from last night: The Republican machine in Wisconsin that Scott Walker and the Republican Party of Wisconsin have honed over the past four years is stronger than ever.”

U.S. SEN. RON JOHNSON in a statement about the election of Scott Walker’s hand-picked Supreme Court justice Rebecca Bradley to a 10-year term on April 5. Outside groups supporting Walker’s candidate Rebecca Bradley outspent those supporting challenger JoAnne Kloppenburg almost four to one.

“There’s no such thing as a free lunch. Somebody pays. And I think we ought to know who it is.”

— MSNBC host CHRIS MATTHEWS pressing former Wisconsin Lt. Gov. Barbara Lawton, a Bernie Sanders supporter, on how he would pay for the free college education that he’s promising voters.

“They had a long time to register, and they were unaware of the rules, and they didn’t register in time. So they feel very, very guilty. They feel very guilty. But it’s fine, I mean, I understand that.”

DONALD TRUMP telling Fox and Friends that his children Eric and Ivanka Trump would not be able to vote for him in New York’s April 19 primary.

“This issue is very personal for me, obviously. I’m disappointed for several reasons. First of all, Mississippi is the only state I know how to spell. Second of all, that is the definition of discrimination. It is also something that the Supreme Court already ruled on when they made marriage a right for everyone. Everyone.”

ELLEN DEGENERES talking to her television audience about Mississippi’s enactment of a law that allows religious fundamentalists to deny public accommodations and services to same-sex married couples.

“I simply believe that if you want to be the nominee for our party, to be the president, you should actually run for it. I chose not to do this, therefore, I should not be considered. Period. End of story.”

— House Speaker PAUL RYAN trying to put an end to speculation about whether he’d accept the GOP presidential nomination if none of the current candidates tallies enough delegates in the primaries to win outright.

“We’re proud of our operations and employees in Cary and regret that as a result of this legislation we are unwilling to include North Carolina in our U.S. expansion plans for now. We very much hope that we can re-visit our plans to grow this location in the near future.”

— Deutsche Bank co-CEO JOHN CRYAN in a statement saying that his institution is canceling plans to employ 250 additional personnel at its North Carolina software application development center. The bank is among a growing number of companies that are dropping projects in response to the state’s discriminatory law targeting transgender people.

Who said what? | Oct. 8 issue

“(The) LGBT community … are like the gay white KKK’s. Get them some pink hoods and unicorns and let them rally down Rodeo Drive.”

— Rapper AZEALIA BANKS tweeting one of her latest homophobic remarks. Her lengthy anti-gay Twitter tirade began some weeks ago when she sent out a comment calling a flight attendant a “f**king faggot.”

“The only thing that separates women of color from anybody else is opportunity. You cannot win an Emmy for roles that are simply not there.”

— VIOLA DAVIS accepting her Emmy Award. She was the first black woman to win an Emmy for best drama series actress.

“Somebody once asked me, ‘What’s the difference between business and politics?’ And here’s the difference: Politics is a fact-free zone. People just say things.”

— CARLY FIORINA speaking at a town hall hosted by the Oklahoma Independent Petroleum Association. Fiorina has come under repeated attacks for spinning or contradicting the truth.

“Everybody thought Hillary Clinton was unbeatable, right? But we put together a Benghazi special committee, a select committee. What are her numbers today? Her numbers are dropping.”

— U.S. REP. KEVIN McCARTHY bragging to Fox News’ Sean Hannity about spinning the tragic attack on a U.S. embassy in Benghazi into a smear campaign against Hillary Clinton. “I give you credit for that,” Hannity responded. 

“I really want to believe that the kind, sweet person who was there when my mom passed away is still there. I was friends with Kim in the past, but I don’t know this woman I’ve been seeing.”

— DALLAS BLACK, a gay resident of Morehead, Kentucky, telling The Daily Beast that he and anti-gay Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis used to be close friends, but she’s changed over the years. 

“It probably would have been better for me if I didn’t come out, I would be on a roster. But, as I said, I have no regrets whatsoever.”

— MICHAEL SAM telling the Hollywood Reporter that coming out when he did probably hurt his career in professional football.

“We’ve constructed an idea of masculinity in the United States that doesn’t give young boys a way to feel secure in their masculinity, so we make them go prove it all the time.”

— Sociologist DR. MICHAEL KIMMEL speaking in a trailer for the masculinity documentary The Mask You Live In.

“When I look at cities around me that have a Planned Parenthood clinic … usually in those cities, as a guy, I could go to many clinics locally that have all the machines that one would need, all these clinics as far as I know take Medicaid dollars, so you could go to any of those clinics to get any medical service you could.”

— U.S. REP. GLENN GROTHMAN telling Planned Parenthood CEO Cecile Richards that her organization’s clinics are unnecessary for him “as a guy.” Grothman shared his opinion during a House hearing.