Tag Archives: San Francisco

Defiant San Francisco vows to remain sanctuary city

A large crowd cheered as Mayor Ed Lee vowed that San Francisco will remain a sanctuary city for immigrants, gays and lesbians and religious minorities despite the election of a president who strikes fear into many of those communities.

President-elect Donald Trump has promised to cancel federal funding for any sanctuary city such as San Francisco that decline to cooperate with federal immigration authorities. He also said he plans to deport millions of criminals who are living in the country illegally.

“We will always be San Francisco,” said Lee from the Rotunda of City Hall as dozens of people roared with approval at an event that featured the San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus and a host of public elected officials.

“I know that there are a lot of people who are angry and frustrated and fearful, but our city’s never been about that. We have been and always have been a city of refuge, a city of sanctuary, a city of love.”

Lee said the city receives between $500 million and $1 billion a year from the federal government, largely for health and human services to homeless, veterans and others. It’s uncertain how the city would recoup that money should Trump make good on his promise to cut off sanctuary city funding,

Trump excoriated San Francisco last year when 32-year-old Kate Steinle was shot and killed by a Mexican native who said he had found a gun and it accidentally fired.

Juan Francisco Lopez-Sanchez had a federal detainer on him, but he was released from San Francisco’s jail after the district attorney declined to prosecute a decades-old marijuana sales charge. The sheriff at the time freed Lopez-Sanchez in keeping with city laws not to cooperate with federal immigration authorities.

San Francisco’s sanctuary policy, which was tweaked and re-affirmed earlier this year, bars city employees from cooperating with federal immigration officials in deportation efforts. The law dates to 1989.

The current sheriff, Vicki Hennessy, also supports sanctuary policy as a public safety tool. Sanctuary advocates say people who live in the country illegally are more likely to report crimes to local police if they know they won’t be deported.

She said that she’s concerned but taking a wait-and-see approach to a Trump presidency

“I’m following Hillary Clinton’s advice in her concession speech, which was to give the new president a chance to lead, and hopefully he’ll lead with compassion and understanding, as well as making sure our cities are safe for everybody,” Hennessy said.

San Francisco teachers union offers lesson plan calling Trump racist, sexist

San Francisco’s public schools have been offered a classroom lesson plan that calls President-elect Donald Trump a racist, sexist man who became president “by pandering to a huge racist and sexist base.”

The union that represents city teachers posted the plan on its website and distributed it via an email newsletter to its more than 6,000 members.

The school district has more than 57,000 students.

It is unclear how many teachers have used the plan outlined by a Mission High School teacher, but it appears to have the tacit support of city education officials.

School district spokeswoman Gentle Blythe said the plan is optional and not part of the official curriculum.

“Educators are entrusted to create lessons that reflect the California standards, support students’ social and emotional well-being and foster inclusive and safe school communities,” she said in a statement that neither praised nor rebuked the lesson plan. San Francisco schools serve diverse populations and teachers are encouraged to include multiple perspectives in lessons, she said.

The Republican Party in San Francisco reacted sharply.

“It’s inappropriate on every level,” said Harmeet Dhillon, an RNC committeewoman from California. She called it “inappropriate propaganda that unfairly demonizes not only the campaign that Donald Trump, the winner, ran, but also all of the people who voted for him.”

The lesson plan was written by social studies teacher Fakhra Shah, who said she hadn’t planned for it to spread citywide — that was a step taken by the teacher’s union. She wrote it at 2 a.m. Nov. 9, just hours after results came in, to help teachers at her school struggling with how to answer students’ questions and concerns about Trump becoming president.

“I think a lot of people were lost for words, wondering, ‘What do we say? What do we do?’” said Shah, whose Latino, African American, white, Muslim and LGBTQ students are worried about a surge in hate crimes since the election.

“We’re calling him out,” she said. “If he’s our president, I have the right to hold him accountable and ask him to take a stance that is anti-hate and anti-racist.”

The plan encourages teachers to let students express their concerns and to offer them hope and tell students that they can keep fighting. “We can uplift ourselves (and) fight oppression here at school even if we cannot control the rest of the country,” she said.

San Francisco is diverse, with many students whose families are in the country illegally and who are worried by Trump’s calls for deportation. She warned teachers that some students may use inappropriate words to express their fear and anger.

“I know that they might curse and swear, but you would too if you have suffered under the constructs of white supremacy or experienced sexism, or any isms or lack of privilege,” she wrote.

About 2,000 San Francisco students walked out of class last week to protest the new president. Earlier this week, Mayor Ed Lee declared that San Francisco would continue to provide sanctuary for all immigrants, religious minorities and gays and lesbians.

The union that represents teachers, the United Educators of San Francisco, defended the plan.

Union President Lita Blanc said that even House Speaker Paul Ryan had called Trump’s campaign racist and sexist.

“There is a time and a place for using words that match action,” Blanc said. She praised the plan’s advice for students — “to stand up and defend themselves, and speak out for themselves and make a difference.”

San Francisco mayor vows to remain sanctuary city

A large crowd cheered earlier this week as San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee vowed that the city will remain a sanctuary for immigrants, gays and lesbians and religious minorities despite the election of a president who strikes fear into many of those communities.

President-elect Donald Trump has promised to cancel federal funding for sanctuary cities such as San Francisco that decline to cooperate with federal immigration authorities. He also said he plans to deport millions of criminals who are living in the country illegally.

“We will always be San Francisco,” said Lee from the rotunda of city hall as dozens of people roared with approval at an event that featured the San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus and a host of public elected officials.

“I know that there are a lot of people who are angry and frustrated and fearful, but our city’s never been about that. We have been, and always have been, a city of refuge, a city of sanctuary, a city of love.”

San Francisco receives roughly $480 million directly from the federal government and more than $900 million from the state, much of it pass-through federal money, city Controller Ben Rosenfield said.

The largest share goes toward health care, but federal dollars also fund public assistance and infrastructure, he said. The city’s budget is $9.6 billion.

It’s uncertain how the city would recoup that money should Trump make good on his promise to cut off sanctuary cities.

Also reacting to Trump’s statements on deportations, Los Angeles police Chief Charlie Beck said his officers will stay out of immigration issues as they have for decades. “I don’t intend on doing anything different,” Beck told the Los Angeles Times on Monday.

“We are not going to engage in law enforcement activities solely based on somebody’s immigration status. We are not going to work in conjunction with Homeland Security on deportation efforts. That is not our job, nor will I make it our job,” Beck said.

Trump excoriated San Francisco last year when 32-year-old Kate Steinle was shot and killed by a Mexican native who said he had found a gun and it accidentally fired.

Juan Francisco Lopez-Sanchez had a federal detainer on him, but he was released from San Francisco’s jail after the district attorney declined to prosecute a decades-old marijuana sales charge. The sheriff at the time freed Lopez-Sanchez in keeping with city laws not to cooperate with federal immigration authorities.

San Francisco’s sanctuary policy, which was tweaked and re-affirmed earlier this year, bars city employees from cooperating with federal immigration officials in deportation efforts except in rare situations. The law dates to 1989.

The current sheriff, Vicki Hennessy, also supports sanctuary policy as a public safety tool. Sanctuary advocates say people who live in the country illegally are more likely to report crimes to local police if they know they won’t be deported.

She said Monday that she’s concerned but taking a wait-and-see approach to a Trump presidency

“I’m following Hillary Clinton’s advice in her concession speech, which was to give the new president a chance to lead, and hopefully he’ll lead with compassion and understanding, as well as making sure our cities are safe for everybody,” Hennessy said.

Opinion: Kaepernick took enormous risk to sit down against injustice

No matter what happens when the final cuts are made, Colin Kaepernick already had the best preseason of anyone in the NFL.

He sparked vehement outrage.

He drew steadfast support.

He got us talking.

That is America — and its athletes — at their very best.

We’re not putting Kaepernick in the same league as Muhammad Ali, whose decision to not fight in Vietnam cost him more than three years in the prime of his career. Or mentioning the San Francisco 49ers quarterback in the same breath with Tommie Smith and John Carlos, who were sent home in disgrace from the 1968 Mexico City Olympics for giving a black power salute on the medal stand.

But Kaepernick is certainly following in the footsteps of those giants, who bravely protested this country’s injustices even when they knew it would come at enormous personal cost.

For the past week, we’ve debated — in coffee shops, at work, on talk radio shows, around the dinner table — the merits of Kaepernick’s decision not to stand for the national anthem before games, his way of protesting the centuries-long short end of the stick that people of color have been getting in America, especially at the hands of the so-called justice system.

Maybe you don’t like his tactics, feel he is being disrespectful to what this country stands for — or, at least, is supposed to stand for.

That’s fine.

This is America. You’re free to express your opinions.

So is Kaepernick, who, it should be noted, wasn’t up in anyone’s face or being disruptive — not that there’s anything wrong with those tactics, either.

The biracial quarterback simply refused to stand for “The Star-Spangled Banner,” a gesture that actually went unnoticed for a couple of preseason games before someone finally realized what was up.

Kaepernick, to his credit, didn’t back down when called out. He explained his motives thoughtfully, saying he wanted to draw attention to the discrimination that undeniably still exists in this country and continues to hold back so many of our fellow citizens.

“We have a lot of people that are oppressed,” he said after Thursday’s final preseason game in San Diego. “We have a lot of people that aren’t treated equally, that aren’t given equal opportunities. Police brutality is a huge thing that needs to be addressed. There are a lot of issues that need to be talked about, that need to be brought to life, and we need to fix those things.”

He’s no longer alone, either.

In San Diego, Kaepernick took a knee along with teammate Eric Reid, who decided this was a cause worth following. So did Seattle Seahawks cornerback Jeremy Lane, who sat on the bench while the anthem was played before another preseason game in Oakland.

Once we get to the regular season, look for more and more players to follow Kaepernick’s lead.

Kaepernick’s future with the 49ers was still up in the air Friday. The once-dynamic quarterback who led San Francisco to the 2013 Super Bowl lost his starting job a year ago, and there was no guarantee that he’d get it back — or even make the team, for that matter. Yesterday, he made the 53-man roster, but Blaine Gabbert was named starting quarterback. Kaepernick also had recent shoulder, knee and thumb injuries to overcome, but it’s foolish to think 49ers coach Chip Kelly didn’t consider the distraction it would be to keep a quarterback who’s made it clear that he intends to keep pressing ahead with his off-the-field grievances.

His willingness to put his career in jeopardy makes Kaepernick’s stance even more admirable. He decided to take on a much greater cause than football with his professional future in doubt, fully aware that it might affect his chances of staying with the team or, should he have been cut, catching on with someone else.

“What makes an act truly patriotic and not just lip-service is when it involves personal risk or sacrifice,” basketball Hall of Famer Kareem Abdul-Jabbar wrote this week in The Washington Post.

Now, it should be noted that Kaepernick’s $11.9 million salary for this year was fully guaranteed, whether or not he’d made the 49ers.

But his future earnings could still take a hit.

“Kaepernick’s choice not to stand during the national anthem could create a public backlash that might cost him millions in future endorsements and affect his value as a player on his team, reducing salary earnings or even jeopardizing his job,” Abdul-Jabbar wrote. “If team ticket sales seriously dipped as a result, he would pay for his stance.”

Invoking those giants of the 1960s, Abdul-Jabbar got to the heart of the matter.

“What should horrify Americans is not Kaepernick’s choice to remain seated during the national anthem,” he wrote, “but that nearly 50 years after Ali was banned from boxing for his stance and Tommie Smith and John Carlos’s raised fists caused public ostracization and numerous death threats, we still need to call attention to the same racial inequities. Failure to fix this problem is what’s really un-American here.”

That’s what Kaepernick has been saying all along.

He loves America. He just wants to make it a better place.

Let’s hope Kaepernick gets another chance to take a knee.

If he does, we should all stand with him.

 

Trump protesters follow his California appearances

Hundreds of rowdy anti-Trump protesters broke through barricades and threw eggs at police Friday outside a hotel where the GOP frontrunner addressed the state’s Republican convention. Several Trump supporters said they were roughed up but no serious injuries were reported.

The protest just outside San Francisco occurred a day after anti-Trump protesters took to the streets in Southern California, blocking traffic and damaging five police cars in Costa Mesa following a speech by the leader in the race for the Republican presidential nomination.

Demonstrators at both locations waved Mexican flags, an action meant to counter Trump’s hard stance on immigration and disparaging remarks about Mexico.

Because of the protest, Trump was rerouted to a back entrance. In a surreal scene, news helicopters showed the billionaire businessman and his security detail walking between two concrete freeway barriers before hopping down onto a grass verge and walking across a service road.

“That was not the easiest entrance I ever made,” Trump quipped when he started speaking to the convention delegates. “It felt like I was crossing the border.”

Outside, crowds of anti-Trump protesters broke through steel barricades and pelted riot police with eggs as the officers stood shoulder-to-shoulder to keep the demonstrators from entering the hotel.

A man wearing a red hat bearing the Trump campaign slogan “Make America Great Again” was punched in the head from behind while being jostled by a group of shouting protesters. Another Trump supporter said he was punched and spit upon by demonstrators who also threw his phone to the ground.

“It went gangbusters. They attacked me,” said Chris Conway, a mortgage broker from San Mateo.

Burlingame is right outside San Francisco, a liberal bastion that became the focal point of the immigration debate last year when an immigrant in the country illegally, and who had been deported multiple times, shot and killed a woman walking with her father.

Immigration has been one of Trump’s main issues and he often has highlighted the San Francisco killing while touting his plan to build a wall along the entire Mexican border.

California’s primary is June 7, a date once seen as too late to influence the selection process. Now it is seen as the election that either gets Trump over the threshold needed for the nomination or leaves him just short.

He’ll likely make many visits to California in coming weeks. That and his hard stand on immigration in a state where millions of immigrants live and that’s run by Democrats who generally support more benefits, services and job opportunities for those in the country illegally raise the prospects of more raucous demonstrations.

In Orange County, once a Republican stronghold but now home to a surging Hispanic population, a vocal but peaceful demonstration before a rally and Trump speech turned violent afterward. At least 17 people were arrested, five police cars were damaged and an officer was hit in the head by a rock but not seriously hurt, authorities said.

One anti-Trump protester bloodied the face of a supporter in a scuffle.

Dozens of cars — including those of Trump supporters trying to leave — were stuck in the street as several hundred demonstrators blocked the road, waved Mexican flags and posed for selfies in front of lines of riot police.

There were no major injuries and police did not use any force.

Trump protesters have followed the candidate since he began his California trip Thursday with a rally at the Orange County Fairgrounds in Costa Mesa, where he filled the Pacific Amphitheatre to its capacity of about 18,000. Many hundreds more were turned away.

Despite the show of support inside the fairgrounds, at least 17 people were arrested after a crowd of Trump protesters turned violent.

Trump protesters, mostly young Latinos according to the Los Angeles Times threw rocks and swarmed cars. A man wearing a Trump T-shirt One man was injured in the face.

Protesters punctured the tires of a police SUV, tried to flip over another and scrawled anti-Trump graffiti across several cars and venue’s marquee, according to the San Diego Tribune. One man was recorded jumping on top of a police cruiser as others smashed out the back window.

Delegate-rich state

It’s possible that California, home to the largest trove of delegates, could provide the margin to anoint nominees in both major parties.

California’s GOP platform  defies expectation in a state known as a Democratic fortress. There have been pushes toward moderation, but the group tends toward conservative leanings and favors calls for a strong national defense, free markets, tax cuts and shrinking the size of government. It’s also socially conservative: the state party’s platform defines marriage as between one man and one woman, and wants Roe v. Wade reversed.

Trump opposes abortion but has spoken favorably about Planned Parenthood. He has warned against cutting into Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security, often targets for conservatives who want to slow government spending. When Trump earlier this month said transgender people should be able to use whichever bathroom they choose, Cruz’s campaign released a statement saying Trump was “no different from politically correct leftist elites.” The California platform endorses free markets; Trump has long criticized U.S. trade policy and advocated steep tariffs on Chinese goods.

How Trump fares this weekend could be an indicator of his fortunes on June 7. The event marks an unofficial kick-off for the California race, which will award 172 delegates — a rich trove in the race for the 1,237 required to clinch the GOP presidential nomination. Currently, Trump has 994 delegates, Cruz has 566 and Kasich has 153, according to the AP’s delegate count.

The contest in the nation’s most populous state — Los Angeles County alone has more people than Michigan — is vastly complicated, playing out in what amounts to 54 separate races on a single day — one in every congressional district and one statewide.

The winner in each district collects three delegates; then, the candidate who gets the largest number of votes statewide claims a bonus of 10 more, plus the state party chairman and Republican National Committee members for a total bonus of 13.

An independent Field Poll released earlier this month found Trump with a 7-point edge over Cruz, 39 percent to 32 percent, with Kasich trailing at 18 percent and the rest undecided.

“Donald Trump is not going to agree with every member of this audience on every issue but he remains the rock star of this presidential race,” said Thad Kousser, who teaches political science at the University of California, San Diego.

But inside the California GOP, Cruz has something of a home field advantage. He’s been organizing in the state since last summer, and is supported by four former state party chairmen, along with a host of elected officials and activists.

With Cruz’s organizational roots in the state, a challenge for Trump will be breaking into the party establishment to line up as many supporters as possible in congressional districts he needs to win in June.

Kasich, the holder of one primary victory, his home state of Ohio, is looking to make inroads in California districts that could be favorable to his more moderate credentials and bolster his bid to stay in the race.

 

Try San Fran’s Tenderloin — it doesn’t bite

Sometimes sunny and always beautiful, San Francisco is one of the world’s most popular destinations. From the Golden Gate Bridge to the former Alcatraz Prison, there is no end to its famous attractions. Guides will recommend Fisherman’s Wharf (home to a Ben and Jerry’s shop), Chinatown, a walk through Golden Gate Park, a visit to Haight-Ashbury and a ride on a streetcar. 

But so many of the books exclude one essential endeavor: a visit to the Tenderloin. 

There certainly are valid reasons to warn visitors away from the neighborhood. The Tenderloin has a high crime rate and is a notorious hub of prostitution and drugs. But for a cautious traveler who is well-educated about the neighborhood’s problems and who wants more than a walk through the capital of gentrification and overpriced real estate, the Tenderloin should not be missed.

The neighborhood has a fascinating history. In 1966, transgender people initiated one of the first LGBT rights riots in the country — predating Stonewall by three years — at Compton’s Cafeteria. Just down the street, the Black Hawk nightclub hosted many famous jazz musicians, including Miles Davis and David Brubeck, before it was demolished in the early 1970s. 

The neighborhood also was home to the film industry before the business moved south to Los Angeles and the ornate art deco buildings that housed film studios still stand. 

Residents of the Tenderloin have fought to preserve its integrity by adding many buildings to the National Register of HIstoric Places, seeking to prevent the gentrification that has plagued the rest of the city. To walk through the Tenderloin is to feel, smell and breathe history at every turn.

The local government also has worked to improve the lives of the poor or homeless residents of the Tenderloin. A small church near the neighborhood center, smelling strongly of incense, offers homeless people a free place to sleep. Even at midday the pews are usually full of peaceful nappers.

Boeddeker Park, a small green space once riddled with drugs, is now a safe haven for children and elders, with school groups frequently reserving time for classes to play there. Other green things can be seen in the form of potted plants outside apartment buildings, adding pops of color to the streets. 

A “pit stop” carrying Port-A-Johns, sinks and needle disposals parks at a new location every day, alleviating what was once a large problem of public urination and defecation. And a truck comes around daily to remove garbage from the streets, making it one of the cleaner neighborhoods in San Francisco.

All that makes the Tenderloin a unique, safer-than-ever setting for several cultural stops. One is a small gallery called the Luggage Store Gallery, which frequently hosts the work of minority, local and student artists. 

The gallery is located on Market Street and attracts a hustle and bustle of visitors who have just made it off the BART/Bay Area Rapid Transit shuttle. It is marked by a small, barely visible sign on its façade and almost dwarfed by a large camera store, yet it is usually packed to the brim on monthly gallery nights. It offers a grassroots art scene that is a contrast to the commercial art of the downtown galleries just around the corner.

The current show, in fact, is called Gentrified, featuring mixed media works, paintings and installations by a variety of artists reflecting on “life in the inner city, struggles of earning and getting by, keeping pace and staying focused; street life, encountered objects and environments they have interacted with, (and) the daily stop and grind of bodegas/marketplaces.”

A tourist’s next stop might be the newly opened Tenderloin Museum. Take the local-guided tour to learn intriguing details about the neighborhood — the best places to view drag shows or hidden murals like Mona Caron’s Windows Into the Tenderloin. 

The walking tour perfectly complements the museum’s permanent collection, a one-room show of photographs, videos, newspaper clippings and text panels explaining the Tenderloin’s history. The museum also sells art by local artists on a rotating schedule, making it an atypical museum gift shop. 

The Tenderloin will feel most like the Harambee and Riverwest neighborhoods to Milwaukeeans, similarly filled with a mix of historic buildings, a comparatively diverse population and art galleries. In fact, most Milwaukeeans have probably been told to stay away from these neighborhoods for the same reasons guidebooks recommend avoiding the Tenderloin. 

There is nothing wrong with sticking to safe choices when exploring a new city, but it’s important to consider whether we’re limiting our experiences of cities by not stepping off the beaten path from time to time. It’s off that path where you truly learn about a city, and the Tenderloin is key to understanding San Francisco.

Sure, Fisherman’s Wharf is nice. But one can only eat so much Ben and Jerry’s.

Run-DMC, Red Hot Chili Peppers to perform pre-Super Bowl show

Run-DMC will open up for the Red Hot Chili Peppers at a pre-Super Bowl concert in San Francisco.

The famed rap group is expected to hit the stage at the sixth annual DirecTV Super Saturday Night concert party at Pier 70. The show is an invitation-only event co-hosted by Mark Cuban’s AXS TV.

“We get to be in the energy of the Super Bowl, which is amazing,” Joseph Simmons, known as the Rev. Run, told The Associated Press on Wednesday. “This should be high energy, fun and cool.”

Super Bowl 50 will be held at Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara, California, on Sunday night. Simmons said he’s also going to attend the game between the Carolina Panthers and Denver Broncos.

Past performers at the DirecTV concert include Beyonce, Jay Z, Justin Timberlake, Katy Perry, Rihanna and Kanye West. The satellite television company also teamed up with Pepsi to put on other shows at Pier 70, including the Dave Matthews Band and Pharrell starting Thursday.

Run-DMC, which includes Simmons and Darryl “DMC” McDaniels, retired the group after their DJ, Jam Master Jay, was killed in 2002. But Simmons and McDaniels continue to perform together, appearing on the LL Cool J-hosted “Lip Sync Battle” last year and the Christmas in Brooklyn concert in 2014.

McDaniels said he’s going to enjoy performing with Simmons at the DirecTV show and hopes everyone will enjoy their performance.

“We are from that era of eternally great, amazing, fun and enjoyable music with a presentation theme,” said McDaniels, who’s flying back to New York to watch the game from home. “That’s what the people are going to get. We’ve still got some longevity with this rock ‘n’ roll, hip-hop thing.”

Run-DMC helped take rap to the mainstream with multiplatinum records and hits including “It’s Tricky,” ”Adidas” and “Walk This Way” with Aerosmith in the 1980s. The group was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2009.

The Recording Academy will honor Run-DMC with a lifetime achievement award at the 58th annual Grammy Awards later this month.

“This makes me look back on my career and the group, and makes me feel really appreciated,” Simmons said. “With all the accolades, it lets me see that we created something special and stood the test of time.” 

10 foods you must try in San Francisco during the Super Bowl

San Francisco is a city with serious food game, whether playing as multi-starred cuisine served in a white tablecloth hush or a simple crab cocktail eaten amid the boisterous clamor of Fisherman’s Wharf.

And with the Super Bowl heading to nearby Santa Clara, the hungry hordes hankering for a taste of the local food scene won’t be disappointed. If you’re lucky enough to be among them — whether you’re looking to dine on one of the city’s iconic standbys or venture into cutting-edge cuisine — here’s a guide to 10 foods and drinks San Francisco is famous for and where to find them.

BEER

Anchor Brewing and San Francisco have a history that goes all the way back to 1849, when German brewer Gottlieb Brekle arrived with his family. The brewery weathered earthquakes, fires and Prohibition just fine, but almost went under entirely when mid-century Americans developed a taste for mass-produced beer. In 1965, Fritz Maytag saved the place from bankruptcy, bringing back Anchor Steam Beer and writing a new chapter in suds history. You can get a first-person look at the brewery via tours available most days except holidays. The tours cost $15 per person, take about 90 minutes and conclude with a tasting. Reservations are required; you can make them here: http://www.anchorbrewing.com/brewery/tours . Another option is the 21st Amendment Brewery & Restaurant (563 2nd St.), which has a selection of house beers served with traditional pub grub.

CIOPPINO

This is the fish stew created in San Francisco by Italian fishermen in North Beach in the late 1800s. They’d toss into a pot whatever seafood was left from the day’s catch — crab, shrimp, clams, fish, etc. — along with onions, garlic, tomatoes, olive oil, wine and herbs. Italian restaurants started serving the dish and soon it was part of the region’s culinary lexicon. A solid bet in North Beach is Sotto Mare (552 Green St.). Tadich Grill  (240 California St.) also is a good choice.

COFFEE

This is a fully caffeinated city with coffee shops on just about every block. For something out of the ordinary, try Ritual, a pioneer in the craft caffeine movement. The flagship location is 1026 Valencia St. in the Mission District. Blue Bottle, which began across the bay in Oakland, has a spot in San Francisco’s Ferry Building. And for coffee with that little extra kick, try the famous Irish Coffee at the Buena Vista Cafe in Fisherman’s Wharf (2765 Hyde St.).

CRAB

You can pick up a traditional crab cocktail at one of the many vendors lining Fisherman’s Wharf, http://www.fishermanswharf.org . For a different take, try it roasted and served with garlic noodles at Thanh Long (4101 Judah St.). Like your crab crispy? Get it shelled, battered and deep-fried at the R & G Lounge in Chinatown (631 Kearny St.).

STREET SCENE

For meals on wheels, check out Off the Grid, a roaming event featuring food trucks, carts, tents and live entertainment. Download the app to get information on schedules and participants. http://offthegridsf.com/

OYSTERS

Oysters on the half shell are a longstanding San Francisco tradition. For an elegant take with a great view of the Bay Bridge try Waterbar (399 The Embarcadero). Starting Jan. 30 dinner will be accompanied by a free light show with the return of the Bay Lights, a display that flashes nightly on the west span of the bridge. Also on the waterfront, Hog Island Oyster Bar in the Ferry Building.

SOURDOUGH

The region’s tradition of sourdough — bread leavened with a wild yeast starter or “mother” dough — dates back to the Gold Rush. Boudin Bakery, established in 1849 — according to bakery history the original “mother dough” was saved in a bucket during the 1906 earthquake — has a veritable shrine to sourdough at its Fisherman’s Wharf location (160 Jefferson St). It includes a museum and demonstration bakery. Another good place to try this crusty creation is Tartine Bakery (600 Guerrero St.).

TEA

Whether you’re parched from purchasing Pradas and other goodies from the boutiques of Union Square or simply resting up from an afternoon of window shopping, The Rotunda at Neiman Marcus is a fun spot to enjoy the elegant refreshment of afternoon tea. Set under a stained glass dome with views of Union Square, the restaurant serves teas, starting at $45, from 2:30 to 4 p.m. Sunday through Thursday, and 2:30 to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday (150 Stockton St., Level Four). Or try the Samovar Tea Lounge at Yerba Buena Gardens (730 Howard St.). English tea service starts at $24.

TIKI

If you like Tiki bars, a stop at the Fairmont Hotel’s Tonga Room is mandatory. Set around what used to be the hotel’s indoor swimming pool, the bar features rain shows, live music and more kitsch than you can throw a tiny paper umbrella at (950 Mason St.). Another option is Smuggler’s Cove, which has more than 400 rums (650 Gough St.).

VEGETARIAN

Into veggies with a vista? Greens Restaurant is not just a vegetarian restaurant, it’s a high-end spot that has been nominated for best overall restaurant in America in the James Beard Awards and is set in historic Fort Mason Center with views of the Golden Gate Bridge and Marin Headlands (2 Marina Blvd., Fort Mason Center Building A). You also can find bountiful produce at the Ferry Plaza Farmers Markets held Tuesday, Thursdays and Saturdays. http://ferrybuildingmarketplace.com/farmers_market.php For a futuristic take on food, try Eatsa (121 Spear St.). There are no waiters or cashiers here. You place your order on wall-mounted tablets, then wait for one of the illuminated cubbies lining one wall to display your name in lights, indicating your order’s ready. Eatsa specializes in quinoa-vegetable bowls in myriad combinations. All are vegetarian and some are vegan.

Mother, son don habits for Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence

They call each other “Sister” when they don their habits. In their street clothes, Sister Causa de Change calls Sister Mae Nora by a different name: Mom.

As members of the gleefully over-the-top Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence, Joshua Shumaker and Lynne Stiglitz are believed to be the only mother-son combo in this global order that spans 32 North American cities and 17 other locations around the world. The two are active in the Milwaukee chapter, the Abbey of the Brew City Sisters, which was founded in 2008 and has a membership of 12. 

When they are “manifesting,” they and their fellow sisters are easily recognizable in their whiteface, brassy makeup and nun garb. (To top off this eye-catching ensemble, each chapter designs its own distinctive “coronet.” In honor of its Wisconsin roots, the Milwaukee group’s are made from cheesehead hats wrapped in cloth.) 

Although they are best known for passing out condoms at gay bars to promote safer sex, the sisters also raise funds, make small grants and provide volunteer support for a range of LGBT-related causes. Since the first chapter was founded in San Francisco in 1979, the SPI has raised and distributed more than $1 million. 

“We call ourselves a 21st-century order of queer nuns who work within our communities to bring joy and rid people of guilt,” said Shumaker, 35, who serves as secretary and Mistress of Propaganda for the Abbey. 

Shumaker entered the order in 2011 after meeting two of the Milwaukee chapter’s founding members, Sister Anita Nutter Cocktail and Sister Truly Fierce, at a memorial service for James Marr, who had owned the Triangle Bar. “I was at the bar having a good time, when all of a sudden I turned around and saw these two amazing creatures.” They struck up a conversation and the order’s combination of AIDS prevention work and flamboyant fun hooked him.

Stiglitz, 59, signed on in 2013. She was drawn to the order by Shumaker’s enthusiasm, the warmth of the other sisters and the fact that SPI gives away 100 percent of the funds it raises. She joined as an “aspirant,” the first step toward membership. 

Aspirants wear secular clothing, with no whiteface or showy makeup allowed. Their job is to accompany sisters on “mission work” to listen and learn. 

Stiglitz is now a postulant, dressing in full regalia but wearing a black eye band. Postulants can talk about their own journeys but cannot speak about the order. One of the next steps for postulants is to choose a “vocation” as either a sister (vivacious female persona) or guard (more subdued male persona who plays a protective role). 

Each step has its own requirements related to meeting attendance and event participation. (“It’s not all fun,” said Shumaker. “You can’t just throw on a pound and a half of greasepaint and glitter and call it a night.”) When interviewed for this story, Stiglitz was organizing a fundraiser for the Pathfinder organization, which provides shelter and other support to homeless LGBT youths. 

The event’s successful completion will pave the way for Stiglitz to become a full member of the Abbey, which prides itself on being open to any adult committed to its mission. 

While some are surprised to see a heterosexual woman in habit and whiteface, Stiglitz said she has been warmly received by other SPI members and the LGBTQ community at large.

“I get a lot of young people who, when they find out I’m his mother, they start crying,” Stiglitz said. “They’re so happy to see there’s a parent who supports her child to this extent.”

Added Shumaker, “Every time she runs into a disenfranchised youth, she does this open and accepting and loving thing … which ties into the love she has for me. It’s a very powerful thing.”

“We’re there,” Shumaker said, “in whatever capacity the community needs us to be.” 

Salt Lake City may name street for gay rights leader Harvey Milk

Salt Lake City could soon have a street named after pioneering gay leader Harvey Milk. 

City officials say they have been working with LGBT leaders on the initiative, which would place Harvey Milk Boulevard near thoroughfares named for civil rights icons such as Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks and Cesar Chavez. 

If approved, the name would go on 900 South, about a mile and half from the headquarters of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Temple Square was the site of protests in 2008, after the Mormon church supported efforts to pass a short-lived gay marriage ban in California. 

But Salt Lake City also has supported an active lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community. 

An annual gay pride parade is the second largest in the state — second only to a yearly celebration of Mormon pioneers. When a judge overturned Utah’s gay marriage ban in December 2013, Mayor Ralph Becker presided over unions of same-sex couples who flocked to wed in the hours after the ruling. 

“We’ve had so many tremendous victories this year alone, and I think Harvey really set the tone for the LGBT movement — how to be successful and organize us politically,” said Troy Williams, executive director of Equality Utah. 

Williams said he first sat down with Becker more than a year ago. The idea could come before the City Council before the end of the year, said Councilman Stan Penfold, the first openly gay council member. 

“My hope is that we can send a message as a city that we acknowledge that kind of movement,” Penfold said. They are still working on what part of the street will bear Milk’s name, he said. 

Milk became one of the first openly gay men elected to public office in the U.S. when he won a seat on San Francisco’s board of supervisors in 1977. His uncompromising calls for gays to come out of the closet inspired a generation of activists, but he was assassinated at City Hall along with San Francisco Mayor George Moscone by a disgruntled former city supervisor in 1978. 

The activist’s life was memorialized in the Oscar-winning 2008 movie “Milk,” and he’s also been honored with a commemorative stamp and a posthumous Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama. The San Diego City Council approved naming a street for Milk in 2012, something officials said was a first. 

“Harvey is a true icon for the LGBT community. He set the standard for coalition building and collaborative leadership,” Williams said. “He is our Martin Luther King Jr.”