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NARAL calls for Trump campaign manager to step aside after battery charge

Donald Trump’s campaign manager, Corey Lewandowski, was charged with battery in a case involving a reporter.

Police in Jupiter, Florida, allege Lewandowski grabbed reporter Michelle Fields and yanked her away from the Republican presidential candidate when Fields was attempting to ask a question.

The police report states, “Lewandowski grabbed Fields’ left arm with his right hand causing her to turn and step back.” The charge of battery is a misdemeanor.

The legal complaint against Lewandowski was filed three weeks ago and new video evidence is circulating this week.

Lewandowski, in denying the accusation, tweeted earlier this month: “@MichelleFields you are totally delusional. I never touched you. As a matter of fact, I have never even met you.”

NARAL, a national abortion rights group, previously called on the Trump campaign to cooperate with the investigation.

On March 29, Ilyse Hogue, president of NARAL Pro-Choice America, said, “Donald Trump needs to have a zero tolerance policy for abusive behavior of any kind. How a candidate runs a campaign is a window into how they would run the country. Not only has Trump campaigned for policies that undermine women and our families, but he has treated women with a disdain and dismissiveness that is unmatched in modern American politics.

She continued, “We’ve already seen how this attitude has infected his increasingly violent rallies and now it seems to have found a safe harbor amongst his staff. The longer Donald Trump tolerates and encourages this outrageous behavior on his campaign, the more it becomes clear that he intends to bring this attitude with him to the Oval Office. Trump should immediately place his campaign manager on leave until the charges against him have been settled.”

The Trump campaign, in a statement, said, “Mr. Lewandowski is absolutely innocent of this charge. He will enter a plea of not guilty and looks forward to his day in court. He is completely confident that he will be exonerated.”

Trump, who was campaigning in Wisconsin on March 29, said in a Tweet: “Wow, Corey Lewandowski, my campaign manager and a very decent man, was just charged with assaulting a reporter. Look at tapes-nothing there!”

NBC News anchor comes out, expecting baby

NBC News anchor Jenna Wolfe came out publicly on the “Today” show on March 27, and also announced that she and her partner are expecting a baby.

Wolfe’s partner is Stephanie Gosk.

Wolfe is the anchor of NBC News’ “Weekend Today,” and Gosk is a foreign correspondent for the network. They have been a couple for two years.

People said Wolfe, for a story on newstands today, said, “I don’t want to bring my daughter into a world where I’m not comfortable telling everyone who I am and who her mother is.”

Wolfe is blogging for “Today.”

In her first entry on March 27, she wrote, “Of all the jaw-dropping, head-turning and eye-popping things I’ve ever told my friends and family (‘I swam with killer sharks,’ ‘I jet-packed 30 feet out of the water,’ ‘I scaled the tallest building in Canada’), nothing garnered more shock and awe (and, yes, some tears) than when I told people I was pregnant.”

On the Web…

http://www.today.com/moms/surreal-jenna-wolfe-stephanie-gosk-expecting-baby-girl-1C9089090

Reporter who broke Romney-‘47 percent’ story wins journalism prize

The reporter for Mother Jones magazine who broke the story of Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s remarks that 47 percent of Americans “believe they are victims” is among the winners of the 64th annual George Polk Awards in Journalism.

David Corn, Mother Jones’ Washington bureau chief, received the political reporting prize for his work, which shook up the campaign when he reported on the remarks in September.

The awards were announced on Feb. 19 by Long Island University.

Winners also include journalists from Bloomberg News, The New York Times, CBS News, McClatchy Newspapers, GlobalPost, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, The New Yorker, The Washington Post, the Maine Sunday Telegram, “Frontline,” and the nonprofit California Watch.

Among the top prizes in U.S. journalism, the Polk Awards were created in 1949 in honor of CBS reporter George W. Polk, who was killed while covering the Greek civil war. This year’s awards will be given out April 11.

The local reporting award went to Gina Barton of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel for reporting on a Milwaukee man who died in police custody after repeatedly telling officers he couldn’t breathe.

Stories on China won David Barboza of The New York Times as well as the staff of Bloomberg News the award for foreign reporting. Barboza’s three-part series looked into the financial assets of government officials and their families. Bloomberg News put together a series of stories looking at China’s elites and their wealth.

China was also the subject for an award-winning television news report by CBS News correspondent Holly Williams and cameraman Andrew Portch. They covered Chinese activist Chen Guangcheng, who escaped from house arrest to the U.S. embassy in Beijing.

Coverage of Syria won awards for war reporting and video reporting. David Enders, Austin Tice and the staff of McClatchy Newspapers were awarded the war reporting prize for their coverage of the war and its factions. Tracey Shelton of GlobalPost was honored with the video reporting prize for her work showcasing the human impact of the conflict.

John Hechinger and Janet Lorin of Bloomberg News won the national reporting award for a yearlong series that looked at abuses in the system for financing higher education.

Law enforcement’s use of young confidential informants became the subject of a piece by Sarah Stillman of The New Yorker, for which she won the magazine reporting prize.

A 10-month investigation into drug abuse and mismanagement at New Jersey’s privatized halfway houses earned Sam Dolnick of The New York Times the award for justice reporting.

Ryan Gabrielson of California Watch won the state reporting prize for a series looking at how abuse at state clinics was poorly monitored and investigated by the state office responsible for doing so.

The Washington Post’s Peter Whoriskey won the medical reporting award for a series about the practices of the pharmaceutical industry that can be dangerous to patients.

David Barstow of The New York Times, working with Mexican reporter Alejandra Xanic von Bertrab, traveled across Mexico to look at Wal-Mart’s activities and the lengths to which the company’s executives would go to get their goals accomplished. The duo won the business reporting award.

The education reporting award went to Colin Woodard of the Maine Sunday Telegram for reporting how for-profit online education companies are affecting the state’s digital education efforts.

“Frontline” producers Martin Smith and Michael Kirk won the prize for documentary television reporting for a piece looking at the global economic crisis.