Tag Archives: rating

Clinton, Trump and the road to 270

Hillary Clinton continues to hold advantages over Donald Trump in the states she would need to win the presidency in November, but Donald Trump has made gains in some battleground states.

The Associated Press has moved Iowa to leaning Republican after recent polls there by Quinnipiac and Monmouth Universities showing Trump’s lead there in the high single digits.

The AP considers preference polling, recent electoral history, demographic trends and campaign priorities such as advertising, travel and on-the-ground staff.

Many national and battleground state polls have showed Trump gaining on Clinton, but several surveys released last week, including an AP-GfK poll released Thursday, suggest the former secretary of state may be consolidating a national lead ahead of tonight’s presidential debate.

SOLID DEMOCRATIC: California, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, Maryland, Minnesota, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington state (200 total electoral votes).

LEANS DEMOCRATIC: Colorado, Michigan, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Wisconsin (72 total electoral votes).

TOSS-UP: Florida, Maine 2nd District, Nevada, North Carolina, Ohio (69 total electoral votes).

LEANS REPUBLICAN: Arizona, Georgia, Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska 2nd District, Utah (50 total electoral votes).

SOLID REPUBLICAN: Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, West Virginia, Wyoming (147 total electoral votes).

Cities scored on LGBT policies; 11 get perfect marks

A new Municipal Equality Index scores cities – 137 of them – on their LGBT policies. The inaugural index, released by the Human Rights Campaign, Equality Federation Institute and Gay and Lesbian Leadership Institute, shows 11 cities with perfect scores – “these cities came from both coasts and in between, were of varying sizes, and not all are in states with favorable laws for LGBT people,” a news release stated.

The 11 cities are:

• Long Beach, Calif.

• Los Angeles.

• San Diego.

• San Francisco.

• Boston.

• Cambridge, Mass.

• St. Louis.

• New York City.

• Portland, Ore.

• Philadelphia.

• Seattle.

The groups used 47 criteria under six categories – non-discrimination laws, relationship recognition, the municipality’s employment practices, and the inclusiveness of city services, law enforcement and municipal leadership – to rate the cities.

The researchers looked at municipalities in every state, all 50 state capitals, the 50 most populous cities in the country, and 25 large, 25 mid-size, and 25 small municipalities with high proportions of same-sex couples.

The index included scores for two Wisconsin cities – Madison, which received a 95, and Milwaukee, which received an 85.

On the Web…

http://hrc.org/municipal-equality-index#.ULTm96WH2R8

Victory for ‘Bully’ rating-change campaign

The Weinstein Company has announced that “Bully,” the award-winning documentary about the epidemic of school bullying in the United States, will open in theaters on March 30 as “unrated” after nearly 500,000 people signed a Change.org petition demanding that the Motion Picture Association of America remove the “R” rating given to the film.



“I am happy ‘Bully’ will maintain its authenticity and will be an accurate portrayal of what thousands of kids experience every day,” said Katy Butler, a bullied high school student from Michigan who launched the petition drive.

Butler, who had her finger broken by bullies in middle school, urged the MPAA to remove the “R” rating from “Bully” so that middle school and high school students would have a chance to see a movie that could potentially save their lives.



“The MPAA might not recognize the reality that thousands of bullied kids face each day in school, but nearly 500,000 people around the country, from celebrities to politicians to bullied kids themselves, stepped up to speak out about bullying by signing my petition,” said Butler. “The brief use of vulgar language in this film reflects what so many kids hear each day in school when they’re being bullied. The MPAA said they wouldn’t drop the ‘R’ rating unless this language was removed, but nothing can remove it from the halls and playgrounds of schools where bullied students hear it each day, except education and exposure.”



Lee Hirsch, director of “Bully,” said that the “unrated” designation for the film will allow the film to portray the real trauma and torment that bullied students experience each day in school.



“The small amount of language in the film that’s responsible for the ‘R’ rating is there because it’s real. It’s what the children who are victims of bullying face on most days,” Hirsch said in a statement put out by The Weinstein Company announcing the “unrated” designation.

“All of our supporters see that, and we’re grateful for the support we’ve received across the board. I know the kids will come, so it’s up to the theaters to let them in.”



Gerry Lopez, the CEO of AMC Theaters, one of the largest movie theater chains in the world, signed Katy Butler’s Change.org petition.

He said previously in a statement that he will make sure “Bully” plays at AMC Theaters even with an “unrated” rating.



“AMC will show this movie, and we invite our guests to engage in the dialogue its relevant message will inevitably provoke,” Lopez said.



He is just one of several high profile individuals who signed Butler’s petition. Ellen DeGeneres signed the petition, inviting Butler to appear on her show, and Anderson Cooper, Kelly Ripa, Justin Bieber, Johnny Depp, Meryl Streep, Michael Jordan, Demi Lovato, Randy Jackson, and Drew Brees all encouraged their fans to show support to “Bully,” objecting to the “R” rating it received.

Download a PDF of the current issue of Wisconsin Gazette and join our Facebook community.

Campaign waged to change MPAA’s ‘R’ rating for ‘Bully’

Katy Butler knows how it feels to be bullied.

When she was 12, four boys came up behind her, called her names, shoved her into a wall, slammed a locker on her hand and broke her finger. “I held back tears while I watched them run away laughing,” she said. “I didn’t know what to do so I stood there, alone and afraid.”

Katy Butler of Ann Arbor, Mich., is now in high school, where she had hoped that she and classmates might see a screening of a documentary due out in late March called “Bully.” The film’s distributor, the Weinstein Company, wants to screen the film in middle and high schools across America.

But the Motion Picture Association of America gave an “R” rating to “Bully,” meaning no one under the age of 17 should see the movie without an accompanying parent or adult guardian.

The MPAA says of an “R” rating: “Restricted. Children Under 17 Require Accompanying Parent or Adult Guardian. An R-rated motion picture, in the view of the Rating Board, contains some adult material. An R-rated motion picture may include adult themes, adult activity, hard language, intense or persistent violence, sexually-oriented nudity, drug abuse or other elements, so that parents are counseled to take this rating very seriously. Children under 17 are not allowed to attend R-rated motion pictures unaccompanied by a parent or adult guardian. Parents are strongly urged to find out more about R-rated motion pictures in determining their suitability for their children. Generally, it is not appropriate for parents to bring their young children with them to R-rated motion pictures.”

The rating of “Bully” raises questions about whether schools will be allowed to screen the film, which explores an epidemic of harassment and violence among the young in the United States. The “R” apparently stems from course language in the documentary.

The filmmakers are lobbying the MPAA to change the rating to PG-13, but have lost one appeal.

Butler, for her part, has launched a Change.org campaign.

“I can’t believe the MPAA is blocking millions of teenagers from seeing a movie that could change – and, in some cases, save – their lives,” she said. “According to the film’s Website, over 13 million kids will be bullied this year alone. Think of how many of these kids could benefit from seeing this film, especially if it is shown in schools?”

Her petition, as of early Feb. 29, had more than 129,000 signatures.

Download a PDF of the current issue of Wisconsin Gazette and join our Facebook community.