Tag Archives: port washington

Drug use led to jailing of Dustin Diamond for parole violation

Wisconsin Department of Corrections records show former Saved by the Bell star Dustin Diamond violated his probation last month by using a painkiller without permission.

Diamond was arrested on May 25 and placed in jail in Ozaukee County for what corrections officials described as a probation violation. Records the agency released Friday show that Diamond took a urine test in his probation agent’s office that day and it came back positive for oxycodone. The actor told his agent he took a pill for a toothache.

The 39-year-old actor was convicted in Wisconsin last year on charges stemming from a 2014 Port Washington bar room brawl. Diamond faced a felony charge of second-degree recklessly endangering safety and two misdemeanors — carrying a concealed weapon and disorderly conduct. The jury found him innocent of the felony charge, which could have carried a sentence of up to 11 years.

In January, Diamond began serving a four-month sentence. He was released in April.

Diamond’s case draw attention from the tabloids and internet gossip sites.

During his trial, Diamond told the jury that he didn’t intentionally stab a man, as prosecutors alleged.

According to Diamond’s testimony, he and his girlfriend Amanda Schutz created a stir when they went to a bar in Port Washington on Christmas Day. Some people wanted to shake his hand and pose for photos. But other bar patrons badgered him and Schutz.

“I felt like we were being set up for antagonistic purposes,” said Diamond.

Defense attorneys said no one saw Diamond stab the man and video footage of the altercation is murky.

Diamond said the brawl started after Schutz got in a fight with another female bar patron. Bethany Ward said Shutz started the conflict but acknowledged punching her in the face. Diamond said he got involved to protect Schutz when he saw her nose “pouring blood.” Diamond said he took out his pocketknife to deter the group from hurting her more.

“I figured it would take the fight out of the people,” he said.

Diamond said he yelled out that he wanted Ward and others to let his girlfriend go, and he scuffled with a man before Schutz was released and both of them left the bar.

The man who was stabbed, 25-year-old Casey Smet, testified that he didn’t know he’d been stabbed until he left the bar and was talking to police.

Diamond said he thought Smet hurt himself when he grabbed at Diamond.

“Casey didn’t even know he was injured, so how would I?” Diamond told the jury.

Ozaukee County District Attorney Adam Gerol argued that Diamond lied about what happened and that the actor had scripted his testimony.

Gerol showed body-camera footage of Diamond’s testimony to a Port Washington police officer the night of the fight. In the video Diamond first said he might have struck Smet with a pen. In a video of testimony later that night, Diamond said he had a knife at the bar, but hadn’t used it to stab anyone.

Defense attorneys said no one saw Diamond stab the man, and video footage of the altercation was murky.

 

 

Dustin Diamond back in jail for parole violation

 

Former TV star Dustin Diamond is back in jail in Wisconsin after an official says he violated the terms of his parole.

Ozaukee County jail records show Diamond, who was recently released after serving time for disorderly conduct and concealed-weapon convictions, was arrested on May 25.

Diamond became a minor celebrity for playing Screech in the 1990s show Saved by the Bell.

An official at the jail (who declined to give his name) told AP that Diamond was returned to custody because of a probation violation. The official said he didn’t have further details.

The 39-year-old Diamond was convicted in Wisconsin last year on charges stemming from a 2014 Port Washington bar room brawl. Diamond faced a felony charge of second-degree recklessly endangering safety and two misdemeanors — carrying a concealed weapon and disorderly conduct. The jury found him innocent of the felony charge, which could have carried a sentence of up to 11 years.

In January, Diamond began serving a four-month sentence. He was released in April.

Diamond’s case draw attention from the tabloids and internet gossip sites.

During his trial, Diamond told the jury that he didn’t intentionally stab a man, as prosectors alleged.

According to Diamond’s testimony, he and his girlfriend Amanda Schutz created a stir when the went to a bar in Port Washington on Christmas Day. Some people wanted to shake his hand and pose for photos. But other bar patrons badgered him and Schutz.

“I felt like we were being set up for antagonistic purposes,” said Diamond.

Defense attorneys said no one saw Diamond stab the man and video footage of the altercation is murky.

Diamond said the brawl started after Schutz got in a fight with another female bar patron. Bethany Ward said Shutz started the conflict but acknowledged punching her in the face. Diamond said he got involved to protect Schutz when he saw her nose “pouring blood.” Diamond said he took out his pocketknife to deter the group from hurting her more.

“I figured it would take the fight out of the people,” he said.

Diamond said he yelled out that he wanted Ward and others to let his girlfriend go, and he scuffled with a man before Schutz was released and both of them left the bar.

The man who was stabbed, 25-year-old Casey Smet, testified that he didn’t know he’d been stabbed until he left the bar and was talking to police.

Diamond said he thought Smet hurt himself when he grabbed at Diamond.

“Casey didn’t even know he was injured, so how would I?” Diamond told the jury.

Ozaukee County District Attorney Adam Gerol argued that Diamond lied about what happened and that the actor had scripted his testimony.

Gerol showed body-camera footage of Diamond’s testimony to a Port Washington police officer the night of the fight. In the video Diamond first said he might have struck Smet with a pen. In a video of testimony later that night, Diamond said he had a knife at the bar, but hadn’t used it to stab anyone.

 

Defense attorneys said no one saw Diamond stab the man, and video footage of the altercation was murky.

 

 

 

Wisconsin site of proposed national marine sanctuary

During the Our Ocean Conference in Valparaiso, Chile, President Barack Obama announced that, for the first time since 2000, two new national marine sanctuaries — one of them in Wisconsin — have been identified by NOAA for possible designation under the National Marine Sanctuaries Act.

NOAA is now seeking comment on the proposals.

In Wisconsin, an 875-square mile area of Lake Michigan, with waters extending from Port Washington to Two Rivers, received tremendous support from the community and was identified for possible designation. The nominated area contains a collection of 39 known shipwrecks, 15 of which are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Mallows Bay in Maryland is a 14-square mile area of the tidal Potomac River, adjacent to Charles County. Nearly 200 vessels spanning from the Revolutionary War through the present are found in the area, including the remains of the largest “Ghost Fleet” of World War I wooden steamships built for the U.S. Emergency Fleet, which are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Both sites were nominated as a national marine sanctuary through the sanctuary nomination process with broad community support.

“For the first time in twenty years, communities can bring forth proposals for consideration to be added to our nation’s system of marine sanctuaries,” said Holly Bamford, assistant NOAA administrator for the National Ocean Service performing the duties of the assistant secretary of commerce for conservation and management. “The Mallows Bay-Potomac River and Wisconsin-Lake Michigan nominations demonstrate this new bottom-up approach, which ensures communities lead in identifying and protecting their valuable coastal and marine areas. We look forward to hearing from the public as these two nominations go through the process.” 

Wisconsin Sea Grant welcomed Obama’s announcement.

The Wisconsin sanctuary is currently on a so-called inventory list and now heads into a more intensive public comment period and scoping, preparation of an environmental impact statement and a management plan. Once those processes are complete, the clock would start ticking toward official designation. The timeframe for those actions is not fully known but could range from months to a year. If successful, Wisconsin would host only one of 14 National Marine Sanctuaries and only the second one in fresh water. 

Since the 1990s, WSG has supported maritime explorations in the area through grant funding in collaboration with the Wisconsin Historical Society’s maritime archeology program.

“Wisconsin has a rich maritime heritage and an equally rich legacy of preserving that heritage,” said Jim Hurley, WSG’s director. “We are thrilled the national panel looking at siting the newest sanctuary has chosen the Great Lakes to move forward. It means continued historic preservation, along with tourism for an important area of the state and highlights an important ecosystem.” 

Marine sanctuaries are now found in Lake Huron, the Pacific and Atlantic oceans and touch states such as Hawaii, Texas, California and Massachusetts.

Sanctuaries are established to protect natural and cultural features while allowing people to use and enjoy the waters in a sustainable way. No disruption of commercial or recreational activities occurs. Sanctuary waters provide a secure habitat for species close to extinction and protect historically significant shipwrecks and artifacts. Sanctuaries also serve as natural classrooms and laboratories. 

Wisconsin applied for the sanctuary designation in December 2014 and competed against four other proposed locations. After an initial screening, Wisconsin and the site on the Potomac River emerged as the strongest applicants.

The sanctuary’s application reads, in part, “The proposed Wisconsin sanctuary encompasses a key portion of an early transportation corridor that was critical to the expansion of the United States and the development of the agricultural and the industrial core of the nation.”

U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin, a member of the Senate Great Lakes Task Force, said on Oct. 5,“The Great Lakes are a great asset for our quality of life in Wisconsin and also for our long term economic security. “I’m proud to join Wisconsin stakeholders, who have worked tirelessly on this effort, in applauding this major announcement that will protect and preserve some of Wisconsin’s most treasured places and boost our local tourism economy. I am committed to continuing my work carrying on the strong Wisconsin tradition of protecting our Great Lakes.” 

As a member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, Baldwin has advocated for additional funding for the National Marine Sanctuaries program in order to help Wisconsin establish the Lake Michigan National Sanctuary.

She also joined Michigan Sens. Debbie Stabenow and Gary Peters to introduce the Great Lakes Maritime Heritage Assessment Act of 2015, which would require NOAA to review maritime heritage resources in the Great Lakes and suggest areas worthy of designation. 

‘Saved by the Bell’ actor Dustin Diamond convicted of two misdemeanors for barroom brawl

TV actor Dustin Diamond was convicted Friday of two misdemeanors stemming from a barroom fight, but a Wisconsin jury cleared the former Saved by the Bell actor of the most serious felony charge.

The verdict came hours after Diamond testified that he didn’t intentionally stab a man in a Christmas Day barroom scuffle in Post Washington, Wisconsin, and that other patrons had been harassing him and his girlfriend before the fight broke out.

Diamond, 38, said some people had wanted to shake his hand and pose for photos at the bar in Port Washington, but that others were badgering him and his girlfriend, Amanda Schutz.

“I felt like we were being set up for antagonistic purposes,” said Diamond, who played Screech in the 1990s show Saved by the Bell.

Diamond faced a felony charge of second-degree recklessly endangering safety and two misdemeanors — carrying a concealed weapon and disorderly conduct. The jury found him innocent of the felony crime, which could have brought a sentence of up to 11 years in prison.

The misdemeanor disorderly conduct charge carries a maximum sentence of 90 days in prison.

Defense attorneys countered that no one saw Diamond stab the man and video footage of the altercation is murky.

After maintaining a serious facade during most of the trial, Diamond grinned when a defense attorney asked if he liked being compared to the character Screech. Diamond said he, like his character, enjoyed nerdy things. And Diamond said he liked being identified in public as the goofy television character.

“That means they love you,” Diamond said. “That means you’re doing your job.”

No apparent Saved by the Bell fans sat in the galleries during the three-day trial. But another apparent fan, Diamond’s defense attorney Thomas Alberti, wrote “Good Luck to Dustin & Amanda” on his car window ahead of the trial. Circuit Court Judge Paul Malloy scolded Alberti and told him to remove it because it was “inappropriate.”

Diamond said he was trying to protect Schutz and that he became concerned when he saw her nose “pouring blood” from the brawl. Bethany Ward testified that she punched Schutz in the face during a confrontation, but insisted that Schutz had initiated the conflict.

Witnesses testified that Schutz pushed a woman at the bar and grabbed Ward’s hand, initiating the incident.

Diamond said he tried to help Schutz and took out his pocketknife to deter the group from hurting her more.

“I figured it would take the fight out of the people,” he said.

Diamond said he yelled out that he wanted Ward and others to let his girlfriend go, and he scuffled with a man before Schutz was released and both of them left the bar.

The man who was stabbed, 25-year-old Casey Smet, testified that he didn’t know he’d been stabbed until he left the bar and was talking to police.

Diamond said he thought Smet hurt himself when he grabbed at Diamond.

“Casey didn’t even know he was injured, so how would I?” Diamond told the jury.

Ozaukee County District Attorney Adam Gerol argued that Diamond lied about what happened and that the actor had scripted his testimony.

Gerol showed body-camera footage of Diamond’s testimony to a Port Washington police officer the night of the fight. In the video Diamond first said he might have struck Smet with a pen. In a video of testimony later that night, Diamond said he had a knife at the bar, but hadn’t used it to stab anyone.

Fondy Farm Feast serves as fundraiser

Milwaukee farm-to-table chefs prepare a multi-course meal with ingredients from the Fondy Farmers Market, Fondy Farm and other local producers for the Fondy Farm Feast.

The event is set for 4 p.m. on Aug. 26 at Fondy Farm, 850 County Highway P, Port Washington. Tickets are $100.

Guests mingle with farmers and take a tour, then feast and then savor dessert while musicians entertain.

Proceeds benefit the Fondy Farmers Market, 2200 W. Fond du Lac Ave., and the Fondy Farm Project in Port Washington.

“We thought a farm dinner would be a fun way to show our supporters where some of the food at the market is grown and to share our other projects with the community,” said Fondy Food Center executive director Young Kim.

Benefit sponsors include the Brewers Community Foundation, BMO Harris Bank and Gorman & Company, with donations also from Digital Edge Copy & Print Centers in Milwaukee and Tony and Lori Koch. 

For more, go to www.fondymarket.org.

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Fondy Food Center participates in win-an-orchard contest

Fondy Food Center’s Port Washington farm is the only Wisconsin site up for a free organic fruit orchard in a nationwide competition sponsored by Edy’s Fruit Bars Communities Take Root Program.

Fondy is one of 100 agencies nationwide vying for 17 fruit orchards, each with a $5,000 value. Fondy would plant the orchard at its Ozaukee County farm, with harvested fruit sold at the Fondy Farmers Market in Milwaukee.

If Fondy wins, it will receive 20 fruit trees and shrubs, an irrigation system, training in organic fruit production methods, volunteer support in planting the orchard and a groundbreaking party.

The top 17 winning sites are determined by the number of on-line votes they receive through Aug. 30 at www.communitiestakeroot.com website.

People can vote once per day.

“The Fondy Farm … is an important part of our mission to connect Greater Milwaukee to local, healthy food – from the farm to the table,” said FFC executive director Young Kim. “Winning this orchard will allow our farmers, most of whom are low-income, predominantly immigrant farmers, the opportunity to plant and grow fruit trees and shrubs using organic growing methods.

“And just as important, these farmers will turn around and sell this fruit to families on Milwaukee’s North Side at the Fondy Farmers Market.”

The Fondy Food Center is a Milwaukee-based nonprofit with two primary programs: the Fondy Farm Project in Port Washington and the Fondy Farmers Market in Milwaukee. The Port Washington enterprise is an 80-acre farm that offers affordable, long-term farmland leases and agricultural and business support to predominantly low-income, immigrant farmers.

Farmers sell their produce at a 48,000-square-foot, open-air market, 2200 W. Fond du Lac Ave., that serves 2,500 customers per week.

Organizers say the market serves an area of Milwaukee with high poverty rates and a severe lack of fresh, affordable produce and fresh fruit.

The market is open four days a week, accepts food stamps and doubles the value of Federal Women, Infants and Children vouchers through its WIC Market Match Program.

For more, visit www.fondymarket.org.

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