Tag Archives: penis

‘Gigolos’ star Nick Hawk insures his penis for $1M

Dolly Parton insured her boobs, Mick Jagger protected his lips, and Keith Richards got a policy for one of his middle fingers.

And now, in the latest episode of the Showtime reality series Gigolos, Madison native Nick Hawk insured his penis for $1 million.

Geldin Insurance is providing the policy for Hawk’s moneymaker.

“In the insurance business, you often get requests to insure odd and outrageous things, but without a doubt being asked to give a quote and to insure someone’s penis is by far the most unusual request in my 24 years in the business,” said company CEO George Geldin in a press release. “It’s not all that unusual for well known personalities and celebrities to have their various body parts insured … legs, vocal chords, even hair, but a penis is an absolute first.”

Hawk, one of the series’ original cast members, has been a companion for women for seven years. He began working for Cowboys4Angels.com in 2009.

“Nick’s member has been a precious asset for many years,” according to a statement from his publicist. “When he was still in college (as an English major at UW-Stevens Point) and first pursuing his acting career, he began stripping at parties to make good money on his own schedule. Within a year, he launched ExplicitStrippers.com, which books male and female strippers for private parties, including bachelor, bachelorette and birthday bashes.”

The company offers strippers in Las Vegas, Los Angeles, San Diego and Hawaii.

Hot off the press: ‘Perv’

With the colorful and bold word  “Perv” printed on the book cover above the photograph of a sheep, readers of Jesse Bering’s newest book might choose to peruse it on a tablet, behind a faux cover or in private.

But “Perv: The Sexual Deviant in All of Us” is about reclaiming the word and getting past condemning what we don’t understand or find disgusting. By chapter two, “Damn Dirty Apes,” a reader might feel free to be seen reading the book on the bus ride from work or at a Colectivo Coffee shop.

Bering – also the author of “Why is the Penis Shaped Like That?” – is the former director of the Institute of Cognition and Culture at Queen’s University in Belfast. He’s a frequent contributor to Slate and Scientific American.

As Bering argues in “Perv,” which comes out on Oct. 8 from Scientific American/Farrar Straus Giroux, we have a moral obligation, in the absence of harm, to recognize that the subjectivity “of sex makes it a matter of private governance.”

Exploring paraphilias ranging from actirasty (the sun’s rays) to zoophilia (nonhuman animals), Bering contends there’s a spectrum of perversion and we all sit, stand or lie somewhere on the scale.

He writes with authority about science, politics, psychology and history, but the author also has a lot of fun in this illuminating, engrossing, kinky hardcover.

Consider just the dedication: “For you, you pervert, you.”

***

Match game

Match the paraphilia to its description – and no Googling.

1. Agalmatophilia

2. Chasmophilia

3. Katoptronophilia

4. Nebulophilia

5. Pygophilia

6. Xylophilia

A. Buttocks

B. Caverns, valleys

C. Sex in front of mirrors

D. Wood

E. Statues

F. Fog

Answers: 1, E. 2, B. 3, C. 4, F. 5, A., 6, D.

Wisconsin clinic offers new hope for men suffering from ED who can’t take oral medications

Men talk about sex a lot and think about it even more. But researchers have found they engage in sex far less often than their level of interest suggests. 

One reason is they simply can’t do it. You might say their minds are willing but their flesh is weak. So weak that Viagra and other erectile dysfunction drugs are among the best-selling in history.

Many factors underlie this  flaccid situation, according to experts. For one thing, the brain is indeed the body’s largest sex organ. And men’s brains are bombarded with conflicting messages about sex. 

“Young men find it hard to understand when their body is telling them to enjoy (their penis), but their parents or their church or the people around them are telling them it’s wrong,” said Scott Story, a Janesville-based sex “mentor.”

Story and his wife are raising their children to feel comfortable with their bodies, he said. Clothing is optional in his home. A recent family dinner conversation, he told me, focused on the volume of male ejaculate.

Story’s clients include a lot of gay and lesbian couples trying to save relationships that have been driven to the brink due to one partner’s lack of sexual interest, he said. For LGBT people, sex is especially fraught with psychological complications. In addition to all the ordinary stressors that adversely affect sexual interest and performance – work stress, relationship problems, money issues, depression, poor body images, etc. – gays often are raised to believe their sexual feelings are abnormal and sinful. 

Having a healthy sexual experience while your super-ego mind is shrieking, “Shame on you, pervert,” is not a cakewalk, say therapists who work with the LGBT community. The subconscious shame that’s chiseled into many LGBT people’s brains during childhood is considered the leading factor behind high suicide, drug abuse and alcoholism rates in the community.

Ironically, another factor underlying sexual dysfunction is the pervasiveness of Internet porn – a mulitbillion-dollar worldwide industry, (Interestingly, Elmhurst, Ill., is the nation’s top city for porn searches, Sunday is porn’s busiest day online and Utah has the highest online porn subscription rate.)

One of the effects of all this porn consumption is that people are becoming increasingly insecure about their bodies and sexual capabilities, Story said. This is particularly true for young people, who are learning about sex from porn sites. They believe that the sculpted bodies, gymnastic copulations and copious ejaculations they see online are normal.

With constant exposure to porn star sex and porn star bodies, young and old people alike are sometimes crippled with the fear of disappointing their partners. For men, this can cause impotence, which leads to depression and relationship problems, which results in more impotence, said Dr. Chris Asandra, a practicing partner at NuMale Medical Center in Wauwatosa. Men caught in this loop wind up feeling woefully inadequate.

For many men, there’s nothing more embarrassing than a limp penis during a sexual encounter. An erect penis is the symbol of masculinity and strength, and “men in general, gay or straight, have difficulty dealing with anything that can reflect (negatively) on their sense of masculinity,” said John Meier, a Milwaukee counselor with a large gay clientele. 

Use it or lose it

Besides all the psychological factors limiting men’s sexual pleasure, there are many physical causes for ED, including aging, declining testosterone levels, nutritional deficiencies and an epidemic of modern illnesses such as diabetes and high blood pressure. But even when ED doesn’t begin as a physical problem, it can become one, according to Asandra.

The penis is like a muscle, he explained. Blood vessels run along both sides of the penis. Sexual stimulation causes those vessels to engorge, flooding the surrounding spongy tissue to create an erection. 

Like a muscle, the penis requires exercise or it loses its ability to function. After long periods of inactivity, it atrophies. Asandra explained during a recent visit to his clinic.

At NuMale, doctors restore the penis to full functionality by giving men a chance to exercise it. Their first step is to administer  vasodilators – drugs that relax smooth tissue, causing arteries to open and allow blood to flow in – directly to the base of the penis. Because the procedure is so precisely targeted, it succeeds more than 95 percent of the time. 

Although urologists have been using vasodilators to induce erections for at least a decade, NuMale has taken the treatment to a new level. Asandra demonstrated the treatment on a patient who asked not to be identified by name.

The treatment began with an assessment of blood flow to the penis using an ultrasound device. A loud whooshing sound and a strong pulse indicate healthy bloodflow.

The patient, a gay man over 60 we’ll call Peter, had audibly healthy blood flow on the right side of his penis. But the blood flow on his left side sounded faint. No wonder he hadn’t had a strong erection in well over a year, he said.

After confirming that blood flow was a problem for the patient, Asandra took a detailed patient history and went over the list of medications Peter takes on a regular basis. He said he would use the information, along with the result of the ultrasound test, to determine which vasodilators to use on Peter and at what dosage.

Going up

The treatment was handled in a friendly and supportive but thoroughly clinical manner. Asandra quickly put the patient at ease, and soon we were chatting about Peter’s Johnson as if it were a separate object.

But “This is very serious medically and not something to be taken lightly,” Asandra stressed. “A lot of people say the penis is the window to the body. If you’re having trouble getting blood flow down there, it usually signals something else is wrong in the body. It could be bad circulation, diabetes, even heart disease.”

Not using the penis only adds additional health problems, he added.

“The more you have sex and the more you ejaculate, the more you lower your (chances) of getting prostate cancer,” he said. “You keep your sperm and testosterone levels at a healthier level than if you ignore your penis.”

Ultimately, Asandra believes that men should exercise their penises three or four times a week – “the same as going to a gym,” he said.

Targeted treatment

Asandra left the room and returned with a concoction of vasodilators specifically chosen for Peter’s age, weight, medical history, and level of dysfunction, he said. He also brought a device that looked similar to an insulin pen. Asandra called it a “micro-applicator.”

“This is not going to hurt,” he promised Peter, who looked a bit scared. “What you’ll feel is like a thunk.”

Peter braced himself for the application, which took a few seconds. But afterward, he was beaming. “It really didn’t hurt,” he said. “It felt exactly like a thunk.”

Peter was told to massage the medicine into his shaft. A few minutes later, he was fully erect and looking awfully pleased.

Peter’s erection lasted 55 minutes, within the 45 minutes to an hour target time that the doctor was shooting for.

In addition to having a higher success rate than ED drugs, physically administered vasodilators have fewer side effects. That’s because the active ingredient in pills circulates throughout the entire body. Because they’re systemic rather than targeted, ED pills affect different areas of the body in different ways that are unique to each individual. Viagra, for instance, can cause headaches, changes in vision that make everything appear bluish and nasal congestion.

A potential side effect from NuMale’s treatment is priapism – a prolonged, painful and potentially dangerous erection. That’s why patients must initially try the medication in the doctor’s office. Asandra has to ascertain that the erection lasts no longer than desired. An antidote is on hand if the formulation proves too strong.

Once the right dose for the patient has been established, the patient receives an instruction session and a kit to take home, so he can use the therapy at leisure. The applicator is inconspicuous and simple enough to use without detection. 

The equipment comes with a 24/7 hotline that provides users of the product support by phone in case questions arise. The cost per treatment is lower than that of Viagra. But, because it’s not mass-produced but rather formulated according to each individual’s unique situation,  it’s sold in larger quantities than pills.

Peter purchased a year’s worth, based on a usage rate of three times weekly. Using the product two days in a row is not recommended.

Recovery

Asandra said NuMale’s treatment actually cures ED. Regular use returns normal blood flow to the penis, along with increasing its size and girth, he said – and he should know. Asandra said he’s seen patients whose penises have shriveled to mere nubs after decades of neglect.

“I’ve always been interested in men’s health and vitality, and I wanted to offer a place where men could come to talk about and share their sexual health problems and dysfunction,” Asandra said. “A lot of guys don’t talk to their primary doctors about it. And when they do, they’re just given pills and told, ‘Good luck.’ This treats the condition therapeutically rather than just putting a Band-Aid on it.”

Asandra added: “Nothing is more gratifying to me than when a patient (in an unraveling relationship) says, ‘Doc you’ve restored my relationship and rekindled something we’d lost 20 yeas ago.’”

Although the majority of Asandra’s patients are in their 50s and 60s, they range in age from their early 20s to 94. His 94-year-old patient has intercourse with his 87-year-old wife twice weekly, thanks to the vasodilators.

“It really only takes about six months to cure ED,” said NuMale president Brad Palubicki. “The vast majority of patients will even say they got their size back.”

“The ultimate goal is penile regeneration,” he said. “It’s a size thing, a confidence thing, a relationship builder. Most people come in either because their wife or boyfriend made them. They want them to engage in sexual activity.”

“The use of this is primarily to save relationships,” Palubicki emphasized.

He said that besides helping men achieve erections, the treatment also helps them achieve orgasm.

“A lot of patients can still get an erection but they can’t have an orgasm because they’re not hard enough to climax,” he explained. “They go home and use this for the first time, and because they’re hard they have a climax. The phone calls (of gratitude) we get are pretty amazing.”

Palubicki acknowledged that not every patient suffers from ED or is in a relationship. Some men seek the service simply because they’re able to have “mind-blowing” sex with the boost they get.

In a world where everyone is supposed to look like – and have the endurance of – a porn star, vasodilators are apparently able to fulfill at least one of those goals.

Editor’s note: NuMale is a Wisconsin Gazette advertiser. 

On the Web

For more, go to  http://numalemedical.com or call 414-727-8787.

Pro wrestler sues over claim that personal lubricant ruined his penis

A martial arts star is suing a Philadelphia sex shop for selling him a personal lubricant that he claims permanently disfigured his penis and left it dysfunctional.

In papers filed in court, Michael Waylon Lowe says the Kama Sutra Pleasure Balm Prolonging Gel burned and scarred his genitals. He purchased the product at The Mood shop, which is also named in the suit.

The product’s active ingredient is benzocaine, which is safe and used in a number of other products.

In the complaint, filed May 14, Lowe says he used the desensitizing gel previously without incident. But last September, he was using it during sex with his fiancée when Lowe “began to experience excruciating pain and pressure in his penis,” the lawsuit states. “He removed the condom and his penis swelled significantly. He sought emergency medical treatment and follow-up care thereafter.”

The complaint accuses the defendants of negligence and product liability for failing to provide proper instructions, warn users of risks, and design and test the gel to ensure its safety.

Lowe suffered “catastrophic and permanent damage,” the complaints says, including penile scarring, loss of sensation and function; nerve and tissue damage; humiliation, embarrassment and mental anguish; lost wages and earning capacity; and loss of life’s pleasures.”

Lowe is seeking $50,000 in damages.

Marla Lee, president of the company that makes and markets the gel, called Lowe’s claims “flabbergasting,” saying the lubricant is one of the 44-year-old company’s original and most popular products, with more than 1 million units sold.

Lowe has competed in the Ultimate Fighting Championship, Pro Elite and other circuits since 2006. He earned several national collegiate wrestling titles and trained at the Olympic Training Center in Colorado.

Martial arts star sues, saying personal lubricant ruined his penis

A martial arts star is suing a Philadelphia sex shop for selling him a personal lubricant that he claims permanently disfigured his penis and left it dysfunctional.

In papers filed in court, Michael Waylon Lowe says the Kama Sutra Pleasure Balm Prolonging Gel burned and scarred his genitals. He purchased the product at The Mood shop, which is also named in the suit.

The product’s active ingredient is benzocaine, which is safe and used in a number of other products.

In the complaint, filed May 14, Lowe says he used the desensitizing gel previously without incident. But last September, he was using it during sex with his fiancée when Lowe “began to experience excruciating pain and pressure in his penis,” the lawsuit states. “He removed the condom and his penis swelled significantly. He sought emergency medical treatment and follow-up care thereafter.”

The complaint accuses the defendants of negligence and product liability for failing to provide proper instructions, warn users of risks, and design and test the gel to ensure its safety.

Lowe suffered “catastrophic and permanent damage,” the complaints says, including penile scarring, loss of sensation and function; nerve and tissue damage; humiliation, embarrassment and mental anguish; lost wages and earning capacity; and loss of life’s pleasures.”

Lowe is seeking $50,000 in damages.

Marla Lee, president of the company that makes and markets the gel, called Lowe’s claims “flabbergasting,” saying the lubricant is one of the 44-year-old company’s original and most popular products, with more than 1 million units sold.

Lowe has competed in the Ultimate Fighting Championship, Pro Elite and other circuits since 2006. He earned several national collegiate wrestling titles and trained at the Olympic Training Center in Colorado.

Chubby Checker sues over name for shoe size-penis app

Rock ‘n’ roll legend Chubby Checker is twisting mad over a software app that allowed users to estimate the size of a man’s penis based on his shoe size.

Checker, whose real name is Ernest Evans, filed a trademark infringement lawsuit against Hewlett Packard and Palm Inc. in federal court in Fort Pierce, Fla., this week, saying that the app “adversely affects Chubby Checker’s brand and value.”

The app, which was called “The Chubby Checker” and apparently is no longer available, was an unauthorized use of Checker’s name and trademark, the lawsuit alleges.

“He’s hurt,” said Checker’s attorney Willie Gary. “He worked hard to build his name and reputation over the years.”

Checker, 71, is seeking a half-billion dollars in damages and restitution.

HP issued a brief statement about the matter on Feb. 14.

“The application was removed in September 2012 and is no longer on any Palm or HP hosted web site,” wrote Michael Thacker, HP’s director of corporate media relations.

He told The Associated Press that the app was removed the same month that Gary sent a cease-and-desist letter to the companies on behalf of Checker.

It’s unclear how long the 99-cent app was available to customers.

According to the industry website WebOSNation, the app sold fewer than 100 copies.

The app was not developed by HP or Palm; it was developed by a third-party. The app developer is not named in the lawsuit.

“We’re going straight to the source,” said Gary.

The lawsuit said that Checker has received patents and trademark licenses for his name to be used for a line of snacks and other food products.

Gay ads, women’s panties, wooden penis part of sexual harassment suit

A Cook County, Ill., man has filed a lawsuit alleging that his boss fired him after he complained about co-workers leaving gay ads, women’s underwear, a wooden penis and tampons on his desk.

Antonio Melone filed the suit in Cook County, naming the Metropolitan Pier and Exposition Authority as the defendant.

Melone worked from MPEA from 1996 to 2011, when he says he was fired after complaining that two co-workers sexually harassed him, according to the Courthouse News Service.

The two men, according to the complaint, called Melone names and made harassing comments about his sexual orientation and ethnicity.

The complaint alleges that the co-workers humiliated Melone by leaving homoerotic photographs, gay ads, women’s underwear, pacifiers, a jar of Vaseline, a wooden dildo and other items on his desk.

Melone complained to a foreman but said no effective action was taken.

He complained again in June 2011, telling the foreman he was being sexually harassed.

That month, the foreman told him he was fired but failed to explain why.

Melone, according to CNS, is asking for reinstatement, restitution of lost wages and punitive damages for sexual harassment, age discrimination, retaliatory discharge and emotional distress.

NJ woman pleads not guilty in penis injection death

A New Jersey woman pleaded not guilty this week to causing a man’s death with an injection of silicone he hoped would enlarge his penis – a procedure experts cautioned doesn’t work.

Kasia Rivera, 35, could face up to 10 years in prison if convicted of reckless manslaughter in the death of 22-year-old Justin Street.

Street had gone to Rivera on May 5 seeking a penile enlargement procedure, which prosecutors say Rivera advertised for in fliers posted at local businesses. Rivera, who performed the procedures in her apartment, allegedly with no medical license or training, administered a silicone shot to Street’s penis, according to prosecutors.

Street died the next day. His death was ruled a homicide following an investigation and a medical examiner’s determination that he died of a silicone embolism. Rivera was indicted by a grand jury last month.

Investigators believe Rivera may have conducted similar unauthorized procedures out of her East Orange apartment, but prosecutors said a search for witnesses, and a public plea for people to step forward, had not yielded any other clients to date.

Rivera, who remains free on $75,000 bail, declined to comment through her court-appointed attorney. Both Rivera and Street were from East Orange, and the case is being heard in Superior Court in neighboring Newark.

Dr. Daniel S. Elliott, an associate professor of urology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., said it was the first case he’d heard of involving a silicone injection to the penis, but he’s dealt with similar cases where patients had attempted to enlarge their penises with injections of fat or other substances.

None of it works, Elliott emphasized, adding that there is no medical justification for the procedure.

“If there were a legitimate method for penile lengthening, Johnson & Johnson or Pfizer would have bought it up and made billions and billions of dollars worldwide,” Elliott said. “The fact that they don’t means it does not exist.”

Enhancement procedures performed by unlicensed practitioners or people with no medical training are more commonly seen among women, Elliott said.

Liquid silicone is sought on the black market by women seeking to enhance their figures, even though it is not approved for cosmetic injections. Besides liquid silicone, injections of substances including paraffin, petroleum jelly and hydrogel have been illegally used to enlarge women’s breasts, hips and buttocks.

In February 2011, a woman from London died after receiving cosmetic injections to enlarge her buttocks at a hotel near Philadelphia International Airport. Philadelphia police said 20-year-old Claudia Aderotimi died after she and a friend arranged online to receive injections. Aderotimi died after complaining of chest pain and difficulty breathing following the procedure.

Although Elliott emphasized that he wasn’t familiar with the details of the New Jersey case, he said someone believing the substances used to enlarge lips or buttocks might have the same effect on the penis would be making a serious mistake. The penis is an extremely vascular organ, Elliott said, and anything injected into it goes directly into the blood stream and can result in a painful death.

“It’s a tragic, preventable mistake of vanity,” he said.

John Travolta sued for alleged sexual assault of masseur

An unnamed male masseur is suing actor John Travolta for assault and sexual battery, reports TMZ, which obtained a copy of the suit.

Travolta is alleged to have taken the masseur to his bungalow at the Beverly Hills Hotel after responding to his online ad. According to the complaint, Travolta “began rubbing the masseur’s leg, touched his scrotum and the shaft of his penis” during the massage.

The masseur alleges that when he reminded Travolta that sex for pay is illegal, the actor replied, “Come on, dude, I’ll jerk you off!” The suit describes Travolta’s genitalia as “roughly 8 inches in length” with “wiry and unkempt” pubic hair.

Travolta allegedly told the masseur that he “got where he is now due to sexual favors he had performed when he was in his ‘Welcome Back, Kotter’ days.”

“Hollywood is controlled by homosexual Jewish men who expect favors in return for sexual activity,” Travolta told the masseur, according to the suit.

Travolta, who is married to actress Kelly Preston, is said to have later apologized for his behavior and suggested that he and the masseur have a three-way with “a Hollywood starlet in the building that wanted … to be double penetrated.”

The masseur is reportedly seeking $2 million plus punitive damages. He’s requesting a jury trial.

A Travolta spokesman issued a statement to E! Online calling the case is a “complete fiction and fabrication.”

The statement reads, “None of the events claimed in the suit ever occurred. The plaintiff, who refuses to give their name, knows that the suit is a baseless lie. … On that date when plaintiff claims John met him, John was not in California and it can be proved that he was on the East Coast. Plaintiff’s attorney has filed this suit to try and get his 15 minutes of fame. John intends to get this case thrown out and then he will sue the attorney and Plaintiff for malicious prosecution.”

Transgender patients and the ‘penis question’

Having to go to the emergency room is an unpleasant experience for everyone, but for transgender patients it can feel as if the personal treatment they get from the ER staff isn’t worth the medical treatment they’re seeking.

Michael Munson, of the Milwaukee-based transgender advocacy group FORGE, recalls the case of a female-to-male transgender patient who went to a local ER seeking treatment for symptoms of pneumonia.

“When asked about the medications he was on, which is routinely asked of everyone, he did report he was on testosterone,” Munson said. “When the provider asked why he was on testosterone, he stated that it was because he was trans. Rather than this being the end of the discussion about his medications, the provider then began asking about if he had had surgery, if he had a penis, why didn’t he want a penis, how could he be legally male if he didn’t have a penis, etc. The result was that the provider ended up being excessively curious, violating the person’s privacy and not addressing his primary concern about his breathing and possibly having pneumonia.”

Munson added, “This type of experience is extremely common.”

The result of these experiences is that transgender people typically are reluctant to go to the emergency room when they need to, Munson said.

Loree Cook Daniels, also of FORGE, said the problem is persistent at both religious-affiliated and secular health care systems and affects male-to-female as well as female-to-male patients.

“The perennial penis question … seems to get asked of trans people no matter which end of the spectrum they’re on.” Daniels said.  “When we train professionals, we say, ‘You do not ask the penis question. It’s treating someone as if the only thing about them that’s relevant is this one characteristic.’”

Gary Hollander, executive director of Diverse & Resilient, said medical ignorance also presents a major barrier to effective health care for transgender people. Physicians are often unable to competently address medical issues that arise about hormone therapy and post-surgical complications, he explained.

“I have been to the emergency room over 20 times in the past year with friends and for myself,” wrote a transgendered person who lives in another Midwest city and asked not to be identified. “We have very rarely walked out feeling good about the experience. The doctors do not understand our bodies, nor do they understand our genders”