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Final goodbye: Roll call of some who died in 2016

Embracing Soviet-style communism, Fidel Castro overcame imprisonment and exile to become leader of Cuba and defy the power of the United States at every turn.

The strongman’s half-century rule was marked by the unsuccessful U.S.-backed Bay of Pigs invasion in 1961 and the Cuban Missile Crisis a year later that brought the world to the brink of nuclear war. But after surviving a crippling trade embargo and dozens of assassination plots, Castro died in November at age 90.

Perhaps befitting the controversial leader, his death elicited both tears and cheers across the Western Hemisphere.

But Castro was just one of many noteworthy people who died in 2016.

The year also saw the deaths of pop music giants: David Bowie, who broke musical boundaries through his musicianship and striking visuals, and Prince, who was considered one of the most inventive and influential musicians of modern times.

Among the political figures who died in 2016 was the world’s longest reigning monarch: King Bhumibol Adulyadej, who was revered in Thailand as a demigod, a father figure and an anchor of stability through decades of upheaval.

Others in the world of public affairs included former United National Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, ex-senator and astronaut John Glenn, former U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno, former Israeli leader Shimon Peres and former U.S. first lady Nancy Reagan.

In the sports arena, the year saw the passing of legendary boxer Muhammad Ali, whose fast fists and outspoken personality brought him fans around the world. Other sports figures included: golfer Arnold Palmer, Gordie “Mr. Hockey” Howe, basketball players Dwayne “Pearl” Washington and Nate Thurmond, Olympians Vera Caslavska and Tommy Kono, wrestlers Harry Fujiwara and Chyna, and mixed martial arts fighter Kimbo Slice.

Artists and entertainers who died in 2016 included author Harper Lee, conductor Pierre Boulez, musicians Leonard Cohen, Merle Haggard, Maurice White, Frank Sinatra Jr. and Phife Dawg, and actors Gene Wilder, Abe Vigoda, Florence Henderson, Alan Rickman, Robert Vaughn, Garry Shandling, Doris Roberts, Alan Thicke, Fyvush Finkel and Anton Yelchin.

Here is a roll call of some of the people who died in 2016. (Cause of death cited for younger people, if available.)

JANUARY:

Dale Bumpers, 90. Former Arkansas governor and U.S. senator who earned the nickname “giant killer” for taking down incumbents, and who gave a passionate speech defending Bill Clinton during the president’s impeachment trial. Jan. 1

Pierre Boulez, 90. Former principal conductor of the New York Philharmonic who moved between conducting, composition and teaching as one of the leading figures in modern classical music. Jan. 5.

Pat Harrington Jr., 86. Actor and comedian who in the 1950s got attention as a member of Steve Allen’s fabled TV comic troupe but secured lasting fame decades later as Dwayne Schneider, the cocky handyman on the long-running sitcom “One Day at a Time.” Jan. 6.

Princess Ashraf Pahlavi, 96. Twin sister of Iran’s deposed shah whose glamorous life epitomized the excesses of her brother’s rule. Jan. 7.

Otis Clay, 73. Hall of fame rhythm and blues artist known as much for his big heart and charitable work in Chicago as for his singing internationally. Jan. 8.

David Bowie, 69. Other-worldly musician who broke pop and rock boundaries with his creative musicianship, striking visuals and a genre-spanning persona he christened Ziggy Stardust. Jan. 10.

Alan Rickman, 69. Classically-trained British stage star and sensual screen villain in the “Harry Potter” saga and other films. Jan. 14.

Rene Angelil, 73. Celine Dion’s husband and manager, who molded her from a French-speaking Canadian ingénue into one of the world’s most successful singers. Jan. 14.

Dan Haggerty, 74. Rugged, bearded actor who starred in the film and TV series “The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams.” Jan. 15.

Glenn Frey, 67. Rock ‘n’ roll rebel who co-founded the Eagles and with Don Henley formed one of history’s most successful songwriting teams with such hits as “Hotel California” and “Life in the Fast Lane.” Jan. 18.

Abe Vigoda, 94. Character actor whose leathery, sad-eyed face made him ideal for playing the over-the-hill detective Phil Fish in the 1970s TV series “Barney Miller” and the doomed Mafia soldier in “The Godfather.” Jan. 26.

Paul Kantner, 74. Founding member of the Jefferson Airplane who stayed with the seminal band through its transformation from 1960s hippies to 1970s hit makers as the eventual leader of successor group Jefferson Starship. Jan. 28.

Signe Toly Anderson, 74. Vocalist and original member of the Jefferson Airplane who left the band after its first record and was replaced by Grace Slick. Jan. 28.

Linus Maurer, 90. Cartoonist and illustrator whose old friend Charles M. Schulz borrowed his first name for Charlie Brown’s blanket-carrying best friend Linus in his “Peanuts” comic strip and cartoons. Jan. 29.

Georgia Davis Powers, 92. Giant in the fight for civil rights in Kentucky and the first African-American woman elected to the state Senate. Jan. 30.

Terry Wogan, 77. His warm Irish brogue and sly, gentle humor made him a star of British television and radio for decades. Jan. 31.

FEBRUARY:

Bob Elliott, 92. Half of the enduring TV and radio comedy team Bob and Ray. Feb. 2.

Maurice White, 74. Earth, Wind & Fire founder whose horn-driven band sold more than 90 million albums. Feb. 3.

Ferd Kaufman, 89. Associated Press photographer who was at Dallas police headquarters as authorities brought in President John F. Kennedy’s assassin. Feb. 3.

Edgar Whitcomb, 98. Former Indiana governor who escaped from a Japanese prisoner camp by swimming overnight during World War II and then made an around-the-world solo sailing trip while in his 70s. Feb. 4.

Edgar Mitchell, 85. Apollo 14 astronaut who became the sixth man on the moon when he and Alan Shepard helped NASA recover from Apollo 13’s “successful failure.” Feb. 4.

Antonin Scalia, 79. Influential conservative and most provocative member of the U.S. Supreme Court. Feb. 13.

Boutros Boutros-Ghali, 93. Veteran Egyptian diplomat who helped negotiate his country’s landmark peace deal with Israel but clashed with the United States when he served a single term as U.N. secretary-general. Feb. 16.

Andrzej Zulawski, 75. Filmmaker and writer named best director last year at a film festival in Switzerland for his latest film, “Cosmos.” Feb. 17.

Angela “Big Ang” Raiola, 55. Raspy-voiced bar owner who gained fame on the reality TV series “Mob Wives.” Feb. 18.

Harper Lee, 89. Elusive novelist whose child’s-eye view of racial injustice in a small Southern town, “To Kill a Mockingbird,” became standard reading for millions of young people and an Oscar-winning film. Feb. 19.

Umberto Eco, 84. Italian author who intrigued, puzzled and delighted readers worldwide with his best-selling historical novel “The Name of the Rose.” Feb. 19.

Eric “Winkle” Brown, 97. British pilot who flew more kinds of aircraft than anyone in history and was the first person to land a jet on an aircraft carrier. Feb. 21.

Sonny James, 87. Country singer who recorded romantic ballads like “Young Love” and turned pop songs into country hits. Feb. 22.

George Kennedy, 91. Hulking, tough-guy actor who won an Academy Award for his portrayal of a savage chain-gang convict in the 1960s classic “Cool Hand Luke.” Feb. 28.

MARCH:

Tony Warren, 79. British writer who created the long-running soap opera “Coronation Street.” March 1.

Thanat Khoman, 101. As Thailand’s foreign minister, he helped cement his country’s close relations with the United States during the Vietnam War. March 3.

Joey Feek, 40. With her husband, Rory, she formed the award-winning country duo Joey + Rory. March 4.

Pat Conroy, 70. Author of “The Great Santini,” ”The Prince of Tides” and other best-sellers, whose novels drew upon his bruising childhood and the vistas of South Carolina. March 4.

Raymond Tomlinson, 74. Inventor of modern email and a technological leader. March 5.

Nancy Reagan, 94. Helpmate, backstage adviser and fierce protector of Ronald Reagan in his journey from actor to president – and finally during his battle with Alzheimer’s disease. March 6.

George Martin, 90. The Beatles’ urbane producer who quietly guided the band’s swift, historic transformation from rowdy club act to musical and cultural revolutionaries. March 8.

Peter Maxwell Davies, 81. Experimental, socially radical composer who served as Queen Elizabeth II’s official master of music. March 14. Leukemia.

Frank Sinatra Jr., 72. He carried on his father’s legacy with his own music career; his kidnapping as a young man added a bizarre chapter to his father’s legendary life. March 16.

Meir Dagan, 71. Former Israeli general and longtime director of the country’s spy agency. March 17.

Bob Ebeling, 89. Booster rocket engineer who spent decades filled with guilt over not stopping the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger. March 21.

Andy Grove, 79. Former Intel Corp. chief executive whose youth under Nazi occupation and escape from the Iron Curtain inspired an “only the paranoid survive” management philosophy that saved the chip maker from financial ruin in the 1980s. March 21.

Rob Ford, 46. Pugnacious, populist former mayor of Toronto whose career crashed in a drug-driven, obscenity-laced debacle. March 22. Cancer.

Phife Dawg, 45. Lyricist whose witty wordplay was a linchpin of the groundbreaking hip-hop group A Tribe Called Quest. March 22. Complications from diabetes.

Garry Shandling, 66. Actor and comedian who masterminded a brand of phony docudrama with “The Larry Sanders Show.” March 24.

Earl Hamner Jr., 92. Prolific writer who drew upon his Depression-era upbringing in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia to create one of television’s most beloved family shows, “The Waltons.” March 24.

Mother Mary Angelica, 92. Folksy Roman Catholic nun who used a monastery garage to begin a television ministry that grew into a global religious media empire. March 27.

Winston Moseley, 81. Man convicted of the 1964 stabbing death of Kitty Genovese, a crime that came to symbolize urban decay and indifference. March 28.

Patty Duke, 69. As a teen, she won an Oscar for playing Helen Keller in “The Miracle Worker,” then maintained a long career while battling personal demons. March 29.

Hans-Dietrich Genscher, 89. Long-serving German foreign minister who was one of the key architects of the country’s 1990 reunification of east and west. March 31.

Imre Kertesz, 86. Hungarian writer who won the 2002 Nobel Prize for Literature for fiction largely drawn from his experience as a teenage prisoner in Nazi concentration camps. March 31.

APRIL:

Leandro “Gato” Barbieri, 83. Latin Jazz saxophonist who composed the Grammy-winning music for the steamy Marlon Brando film “Last Tango in Paris” and recorded dozens of albums over a career spanning more than seven decades. April 2.

Erik Bauersfeld, 93. He turned three words from a minor acting role – “It’s a trap!” – into one of the most beloved lines of the “Star Wars” series. April 3.

Merle Haggard, 79. Country giant who rose from poverty and prison to international fame through his songs about outlaws, underdogs and an abiding sense of national pride in such hits as “Okie From Muskogee” and “Sing Me Back Home.” April 6.

Howard Marks, 70. Convicted drug smuggler who reinvented himself as an author, raconteur and drug-reform campaigner after publishing the best-selling autobiography “Mr. Nice.” April 10.

David Gest, 62. Music producer, reality TV star and former husband of Liza Minnelli. April 12.

Fred Hayman, 90. Dapper entrepreneur and “Godfather of Rodeo Drive” whose vision transformed a nondescript Southern California street into one of the world’s pre-eminent fashion districts. April 14.

Doris Roberts, 90. She played the tart-tongued, endlessly meddling mother on “Everybody Loves Raymond.” April 17.

Patricio Aylwin, 97. Lanky law professor who played a decisive role in restoring Chile’s democracy after 17 years of brutal dictatorship and was later elected president. April 19.

Chyna, 46. Tall, muscle-bound, raven-haired pro-wrestler who rocketed to popularity in the 1990s and later made the rounds on reality TV. April 20.

Dwayne “Pearl” Washington, 52. Basketball player who went from New York City playground wonder to Big East star for Jim Boeheim at Syracuse. April 20.

Victoria Wood, 62. British comedian who found humor in everyday life and blazed a trail for other female comics. April 20.

Prince, 57. One of the most inventive and influential musicians of modern times with hits including “Little Red Corvette,” ”Let’s Go Crazy” and “When Doves Cry.” April 21.

Isabelle Dinoire, 49. Frenchwoman who received the world’s first partial face transplant. April 22.

Billy Paul, 80. Jazz and soul singer best known for the No. 1 hit ballad and “Philadelphia Soul” classic “Me and Mrs. Jones.” April 24.

Remo Belli, 88. Musician who pioneered the synthetic drumhead in time to help a generation of rock-and-rollers shape their sound and then saw it become standard on kits across genres. April 25.

Harry Wu, 79. Former political prisoner who dedicated his later life to exposing abuses in China’s brutal prison labor camp system. April 26.

Ozzie Silna, 83. He turned a fading American Basketball Association franchise into a four-decade windfall of nearly $800 million from the NBA in what’s commonly called the greatest deal in sports history. April 26.

Conrad Burns, 81. Former U.S. senator whose folksy demeanor and political acumen earned him three terms and the bitter disdain of his opponents. April 28.

Rev. Daniel Berrigan, 94. Roman Catholic priest and peace activist who was imprisoned for burning draft files in a protest against the Vietnam War. April 30.

MAY:

Tommy Kono, 85. He took up weightlifting in an internment camp for Japanese-Americans and went on to win two Olympic gold medals for the United States. May 1.

Madeleine LeBeau, 92. French actress best known for her small but memorable role in “Casablanca” as Rick’s pushed aside girlfriend Yvonne who passionately sings “La Marseillaise” at a pivotal moment. May 1.

Afeni Shakur, 69. Former Black Panther who inspired the work of her son, rap icon Tupac Shakur, and fostered his legacy for decades after he was slain. May 2.

Carl Fredrik Reutersward, 81. One of Sweden’s best-known modern artists and the creator of the iconic statue of a revolver barrel tied in a knot. May 3.

Bob Bennett, 82. Former U.S. senator who shied away from the spotlight but earned a reputation as someone who knew how to get things done in Washington. May 4.

William Schallert, 93. Veteran performer and Hollywood union leader who played Patty Duke’s father – and uncle – on TV and led a long, contentious strike for actors. May 8.

Gene Gutowski, 90. Polish-American Holocaust survivor who was the producer of three films by director Roman Polanski in the 1960s and reunited with him decades later for the Oscar-winning Holocaust drama “The Pianist.” May 10.

Donnovan Hill, 18. California teenager whose paralyzing football injury led to increased safety protections for young players after he sued a youth league. May 11.

Samuel Gibson, 39. Diminutive New Zealand man who inspired many by defying the brittle bones he was born with and pursuing a life filled with rigorous outdoor adventures. May 16. Died after falling from wheelchair during half-marathon.

Guy Clark, 74. Texas singer-songwriter who helped mentor a generation of songwriters and wrote hits like “L.A. Freeway” and “Desperados Waiting for a Train.” May 17.

Morley Safer, 84. Veteran “60 Minutes” correspondent who was equally at home reporting on social injustices, the Orient Express and abstract art, and who exposed a military atrocity in Vietnam that played an early role in changing Americans’ view of the war. May 19.

Rosalie Chris Lerman, 90. Survivor of the Auschwitz-Birkenau Nazi death camp who was the wife of the founder of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum and a passionate advocate of Holocaust remembrance. May 19.

Alan Young, 96. Actor-comedian who played the amiable straight man to a talking horse in the 1960s sitcom “Mister Ed.” May 19.

Kang Sok Ju, 76. Top North Korean diplomat who negotiated a short-lived 1994 deal with the United States to freeze his nation’s nuclear programs in exchange for international aid. May 20.

Mullah Mohammed Akhtar Mansour, believed to be in his mid-50s. His brief rule of the Taliban in Afghanistan was marked by mistrust and strife. May 20. Killed in a drone strike.

Thomas E. Schaefer, 85. Retired Air Force colonel who was the ranking military officer among the 52 Americans held hostage in Iran for 444 days before being released in 1981. May 31.

JUNE:

Muhammad Ali, 74. Heavyweight champion whose fast fists, irrepressible personality and determined spirit transcended sports and captivated the world. June 3.

Peter Shaffer, 90. British playwright whose durable, award-winning hits included “Equus” and “Amadeus.” June 6.

Victor Korchnoi, 85. Chess grandmaster and former Soviet champion who defected to the West and was considered among the best players never to win a world championship. June 6.

Kimbo Slice, 42. Bearded street fighter who parlayed his Internet popularity into a mixed martial arts career. June 6.

Theresa Saldana, 61. “Raging Bull” actress who survived a stalker’s brutal attack to become a crime victims’ advocate and reclaimed her entertainment career with “The Commish” and other TV shows. June 6.

Gordie Howe, 88. Known as “Mr. Hockey,” the rough-and-tumble Canadian farm boy whose blend of talent and toughness made him the NHL’s quintessential star. June 10.

Margaret Vinci Heldt, 98. She became a hairstyling celebrity after she created the beehive hairdo in 1960. June 10.

George Voinovich, 79. Former U.S. senator and a two-term Ohio governor who preached frugality in his personal and public life and occasionally bucked the GOP establishment. June 12.

Lois Duncan, 82. Known for her pioneering suspense novels that captivated young readers, including “I Know What You Did Last Summer,” which became a movie. June 15.

Jo Cox, 41. Lawmaker who campaigned for Britain to stay in the European Union. June 16. Killed by a gun- and knife-wielding attacker.

Anton Yelchin, 27. Rising actor best known for playing Chekov in the new “Star Trek” films. June 19. Hit by his car in his driveway.

Wayne Jackson, 74. Trumpet player on rock ‘n’ roll, soul, R&B and pop mainstays along with Memphis Horns partner and tenor saxophonist Andrew Love. June 21.

David Jonathan Thatcher, 94. Member of the Doolittle Raiders, who bombed Japan in an attack that stunned that nation and boosted U.S. morale during World War II. June 22.

John Ashe, 61. Former U.N. General Assembly president who was facing criminal charges in a bribery case. June 22.

Michael Herr, 76. Author and Oscar-nominated screenplay writer who viscerally documented the ravages of the Vietnam War through his classic nonfiction novel “Dispatches” and through such films as “Apocalypse Now” and “Full Metal Jacket.” June 23.

Bernie Worrell, 72. “Wizard of Woo” whose amazing array of keyboard sounds helped define the Parliament-Funkadelic musical empire and influenced performers of many genres. June 24.

Bud Spencer, 86. Burly comic actor dubbed the “good giant” for punching out bad guys on the screen, often in a long series of spaghetti westerns. June 27.

Alvin Toffler, 87. Guru of the post-industrial age whose “Future Shock” and other books anticipated the disruptions and transformations brought about by the rise of digital technology. June 27.

Isak Chishi Swu, 87. Militant leader of the Naga tribal insurgency in India. June 28.

Pat Summitt, 64. Winningest coach in Division I college basketball history who uplifted the women’s game from obscurity to national prominence during her 38-year career at Tennessee. June 28.

JULY:

Elie Wiesel, 87. Romanian-born Holocaust survivor whose classic “Night” became a landmark testament to the Nazis’ crimes and launched his career as one of the world’s foremost witnesses and humanitarians. July 2.

Michael Cimino, 77. Oscar-winning director whose film “The Deer Hunter” became one of the great triumphs of Hollywood’s 1970s heyday and whose disastrous “Heaven’s Gate” helped bring that era to a close. July 2.

Jack C. Taylor, 94. He started a leasing company with seven cars and built it into Enterprise Rent-A-Car. July 2.

Abbas Kiarostami, 76. Iranian director whose 1997 film “Taste of Cherry” won the prestigious Palme d’Or and who kept working despite government resistance. July 4.

William L. Armstrong, 79. Colorado media executive who became a major conservative voice in the Senate. July 5.

Abdul Sattar Edhi, 88. Pakistan’s legendary philanthropist who devoted his life to the poor and the destitute. July 8.

Sydney H. Schanberg, 82. Former New York Times correspondent awarded a Pulitzer Prize for his coverage of the genocide in Cambodia in 1975 and whose story of the survival of his assistant inspired the film “The Killing Fields.” July 9.

Bernardo Provenzano, 83. Convicted Cosa Nostra “boss of bosses” who reputedly led the Mafia’s powerful Corleone clan. July 13.

Nate Thurmond, 74. Tenacious NBA defensive center who played with Wilt Chamberlain. July 16.

Alan Vega, 78. Punk pioneer who helped form the duo Suicide, widely regarded as a forerunner of punk and electronic music. July 16.

Wendell Anderson, 83. Former Minnesota governor and ex-Olympian described in a 1973 Time magazine cover article as the youthful embodiment of his home state only to lose public confidence later by arranging his own appointment to the U.S. Senate. July 17.

Clown Dimitri, 80. Beloved Swiss clown and mime over nearly six decades who studied under Marcel Marceau and spread smiles from Broadway to Congo. July 19.

Mark Takai, 49. U.S. representative, war veteran and long-time legislator known for his bright nature and deep commitment to service. July 20. Pancreatic cancer.

Thomas Sutherland, 85. Teacher who was held captive in Lebanon for more than six years until he was freed in 1991 and returned home to become professor emeritus at Colorado State University. July 22.

Marni Nixon, 86. Hollywood voice double whose singing was heard in place of the leading actresses’ in such movie musicals as “West Side Story,” ”The King and I” and “My Fair Lady.” July 24.

Rev. Tim LaHaye, 90. Co-author of the “Left Behind” series, a multimillion-selling literary juggernaut that brought end-times prophecy into mainstream bookstores. July 25.

Sam Wheeler, 72. Renowned land speed motorcycle racer. July 25. Injuries suffered in a motorcycle crash.

Youree Dell Harris, 53. Actress who became famous playing the Jamaican psychic Miss Cleo, claiming to know callers’ futures in ubiquitous TV infomercials and commercials. July 26.

Gloria DeHaven, 91. Daughter of vaudeville stars who carved out her own career as the vivacious star of Hollywood musicals and comedies of the 1940s and ’50s. July 30.

AUGUST:

Anne of Romania, 92. Wife of Romania’s last monarch, King Michael. Aug. 1.

Ahmed Zewail, 70. Science adviser to President Obama who won the 1999 Nobel Prize for his work on the study of chemical reactions over short time scales. Aug. 2.

Pete Fountain, 86. Clarinetist whose Dixieland jazz virtuosity and wit endeared him to his native New Orleans and earned him national television fame. Aug. 6.

Helen Delich Bentley, 92. Former Maryland congresswoman who was an expert on the maritime industry. Aug. 6.

Robert Kiley, 80. He is credited with revitalizing and modernizing public transportation networks in Boston, New York and London. Aug. 9.

Harry Briggs Jr., 75. As a young boy, he was at the center of a lawsuit that culminated with the U.S. Supreme Court outlawing segregated public schools. Aug. 9.

Kenny Baker, 81. He played the lovable droid R2-D2 in the “Star Wars” films, achieving cult status and fans’ adulation without showing his face or speaking any lines. Aug. 13.

Fyvush Finkel, 93. Plastic-faced Emmy Award-winning actor whose career in stage and screen started in Yiddish theater and led to memorable roles in “Fiddler on the Roof” on Broadway and on TV in “Boston Public” and “Picket Fences.” Aug. 14.

Bobby Hutcherson, 75. Bricklayer’s son who became one of the most inventive jazz vibraphonists to pick up a pair of mallets. Aug. 15.

Joao Havelange, 100. President of FIFA for two decades, who transformed soccer’s governing body into a multibillion-dollar business but also a hotbed for subsequent corruption. Aug. 16.

John McLaughlin, 89. Conservative commentator and host of a long-running television show that pioneered hollering-heads discussions of Washington politics. Aug. 16.

Arthur Hiller, 92. Oscar nominee for directing the hugely popular romantic tragedy “Love Story” during a career that spanned dozens of popular movies and TV shows. Aug. 17.

John W. Vessey, 94. Army general who rose in a 46-year military career to become chairman of the joint chiefs of staff and helped oversee Reagan’s military buildup. Aug. 18.

Jay Fishman, 63. Former Travelers Group insurance company chief executive who became a national advocate for research into Lou Gehrig’s disease after being diagnosed with it. Aug. 19.

Donald “D.A.” Henderson, 87. Epidemiologist whose leadership resulted in the eradication nearly 40 years ago of smallpox, one of the world’s most feared contagious diseases. Aug. 19.

Toots Thielemans, 94. Belgian harmonica player whose career included playing with jazz greats like Miles Davis and whose solos have figured on numerous film scores. Aug. 22.

Walter Scheel, 97. He helped shape West Germany’s policy of reconciliation with the communist bloc as foreign minister and later served as his country’s president. Aug. 24.

Sonia Rykiel, 86. French designer dubbed the “queen of knitwear” whose relaxed sweaters in berry-colored stripes and eye-popping motifs helped liberate women from stuffy suits. Aug. 25.

Gene Wilder, 83. Frizzy-haired actor who brought his deft comedic touch to such unforgettable roles as the neurotic accountant in “The Producers” and the mad scientist of “Young Frankenstein.” Aug. 28.

Juan Gabriel, 66. Mexican songwriter and singer who was an icon in the Latin music world. Aug. 28.

Harry Fujiwara, 82. Better known as Mr. Fuji, he was a former star wrestler and manager. Aug. 28.

Vera Caslavska, 74. Seven-time Olympic gymnastics gold medalist who stood up against the 1968 Soviet-led invasion of Czechoslovakia. Aug. 30.

SEPTEMBER:

Jon Polito, 65. Raspy-voiced actor whose 200-plus credits ranged from “Homicide: Life on the Street” and “Modern Family” to the films “Barton Fink” and “The Big Lebowski.” Sept. 1.

Sam Iacobellis, 87. Rockwell International engineer who met President Ronald Reagan’s challenge to deliver 100 B-1 bombers as fast as possible in the early 1980s to challenge the Soviet Union. Sept. 3.

Hugh O’Brian, 91. He shot to fame as Sheriff Wyatt Earp in what was hailed as television’s first adult Western. Sept. 5.

Phyllis Schlafly, 92. Outspoken conservative activist who helped defeat the Equal Rights Amendment in the 1970s and founded the Eagle Forum political group. Sept. 5.

Bobby Chacon, 64. Hall of Fame boxer whose memorable fights included victories over Rafael “Bazooka” Limon, Cornelius Boza-Edwards, Danny Lopez and Ruben Olivares. Sept. 7.

Greta Zimmer Friedman, 92. Believed to be the woman in an iconic photo shown kissing an ecstatic sailor in Times Square celebrating the end of World War II. Sept. 8.

Johan Botha, 51. Tenor whose light but muscular voice dazzled audiences at the world’s top operatic stages. Sept. 8.

Lady Chablis, 59. Transgender performer who became a celebrity for her role in the 1994 best-seller “Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil.” Sept. 8.

Jack Hofsiss, 65. Stage and screen director who won a Tony Award in his first outing on Broadway while helming “The Elephant Man” and kept working despite an accident that left him without the use of his arms and legs. Sept. 13.

Rose Mofford, 94. Arizona’s first female governor and a shepherd for the state during a period of political turbulence. Sept. 15.

Edward Albee, 88. Three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright who challenged theatrical convention in masterworks such as “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” and “A Delicate Balance.” Sept. 16.

W.P. Kinsella, 81. Canadian novelist who blended magical realism and baseball in the book that became the smash hit film “Field of Dreams.” Sept. 16.

Charmian Carr, 73. Actress best known for sweetly portraying the eldest von Trapp daughter in “The Sound of Music.” Sept. 17.

Rose Pak, 68. Brash community activist who helped transform San Francisco’s growing Asian American population into a politically powerful constituency. Sept. 18.

Stanley “Buckwheat” Dural Jr., 68. Musician who rose from a cotton-picking family in southwest Louisiana to introduce zydeco music to the world through his band Buckwheat Zydeco. Sept. 24.

Arnold Palmer, 87. Golfing great who brought a country-club sport to the masses with a hard-charging style, charisma and a commoner’s touch. Sept. 25.

Jean Shepard, 82. “The grand lady of the Grand Ole Opry” who had a long recording career in country music. Sept. 25.

Ben Steele, 98. Bataan Death March survivor whose art helped him maintain his sanity as a prisoner of war and helped him forgive his captors. Sept. 25.

Curtis Roosevelt, 86. He lived in the White House as a child when his grandfather, Franklin D. Roosevelt, was president and worked for two decades at the United Nations. Sept. 26.

Shimon Peres, 93. Former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace. Sept. 28.

OCTOBER:

Joan Marie Johnson, 72. A founding member of the New Orleans girl group The Dixie Cups, who had a No. 1 hit in 1964 with “Chapel of Love.” Oct. 3.

Jacob Neusner, 84. He transformed the study of American Judaism, becoming one of the most influential 20th-century scholars of the religion. Oct. 8.

Aaron Pryor, 60. Relentless junior welterweight who fought two memorable bouts with Alexis Arguello. Oct. 9.

Andrzej Wajda, 90. Poland’s leading filmmaker whose career maneuvering between a repressive communist government and an audience yearning for freedom won him international recognition and an honorary Oscar. Oct. 9.

Donn Fendler, 90. As a boy, he survived nine days alone on Maine’s tallest mountain in 1939 and later wrote a book about the ordeal. Oct. 10.

Dario Fo, 90. Italian playwright whose energetic mocking of Italian political life, social mores and religion won him praise, scorn and the Nobel Prize for Literature. Oct. 13.

King Bhumibol Adulyadej, 88. World’s longest reigning monarch, he was revered in Thailand as a demigod, a humble father figure and an anchor of stability through decades of upheaval at home and abroad. Oct. 13.

Dennis Byrd, 51. Former NFL defensive lineman whose career was ended by neck injury. Oct. 15. Car accident.

Junko Tabei, 77. The first woman to climb Mount Everest. Oct. 20.

Tom Hayden, 76. 1960s antiwar activist whose name became forever linked with the Chicago 7 trial, Vietnam War protests and his ex-wife, actress Jane Fonda. Oct. 23.

Sheikh Khalifa bin Hamad Al Thani, 84. Former emir of Qatar who was deposed by his son in a bloodless palace coup. Oct. 23.

Jack T. Chick, 92. His cartoon tracts preached fundamentalist Christianity while vilifying secular society, evolution, homosexuality, and the beliefs of Catholics and Muslims. Oct. 23.

Bobby Vee, 73. Boyish, grinning 1960s singer whose career was born when he took a stage as a teenager to fill in after the 1959 plane crash that killed rock ‘n’ roll stars Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and J.P. “The Big Bopper” Richardson. Oct. 24.

Jorge Batlle, 88. Former president was a force in Uruguayan politics for half a century, who led the nation during one of its worst economic recessions. Oct. 24.

Robert A. Hoover, 94. World War II fighter pilot who became an aviation legend for his flying skills in testing aircraft and demonstrating their capabilities in air shows. Oct. 25.

Norman R. Brokaw, 89. Talent agent who represented Marilyn Monroe, Elvis Presley, Clint Eastwood and other top Hollywood stars. Oct. 29.

NOVEMBER:

Jean-Jacques Perrey, 87. French composer and pioneer of electronic pop music who was best known for co-writing “Baroque Hoedown,” used as the music for the Main Street Electrical Parade at Disney theme parks. Nov. 4.

Janet Reno, 78. First woman to serve as U.S. attorney general and the epicenter of several political storms during the Clinton administration, including the seizure of Elian Gonzalez. Nov. 7.

Leonard Cohen, 82. Baritone-voiced Canadian singer-songwriter who blended spirituality and sexuality in songs like “Hallelujah,” ”Suzanne” and “Bird on a Wire.” Nov. 7.

Robert Vaughn, 83. Debonair, Oscar-nominated actor whose many film roles were eclipsed by his hugely popular turn in television’s “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.” Nov. 11.

Gwen Ifill, 61. Co-anchor of PBS’ “NewsHour” with Judy Woodruff and a veteran journalist who moderated two vice presidential debates. Nov. 14.

Holly Dunn, 59. Country singer who had a hit in 1986 with “Daddy’s Hands,” about her minister father. Nov. 14.

Mose Allison, 89. Pianist and singer whose witty, Southern-accented lyrics delivered over a backdrop of boogie-woogie blues and jazz piano influenced musicians across a wide spectrum. Nov. 15.

Anthony Brooklier, 70. Los Angeles lawyer whose clients included “Hollywood Madam” Heidi Fleiss and his own mob-boss father. Nov. 15.

Melvin Laird, 94. Former Wisconsin congressman and U.S. defense secretary during years when President Richard Nixon sought a way to withdraw troops from Vietnam. Nov. 16.

Mentor Williams, 70. Award-winning songwriter behind the 1970s hit “Drift Away,” which became a soulful rock ‘n’ roll anthem aired on radio stations for generations. Nov. 16.

Denton Cooley, 96. Cardiovascular surgeon who performed some of the nation’s first heart transplants and implanted the world’s first artificial heart. Nov. 18.

Sharon Jones, 60. Powerhouse who shepherded a soul revival despite not finding stardom until middle age. Nov. 18. Cancer.

Ralph Branca, 90. Brooklyn Dodgers pitcher who gave up the “Shot Heard ‘Round the World” that still echoes six decades later as one of the most famous home runs in baseball history. Nov. 23.

Florence Henderson, 82. Broadway star who became one of America’s most beloved television moms in “The Brady Bunch.” Nov. 24.

Fidel Castro, 90. He led his bearded rebels to victorious revolution in 1959, embraced Soviet-style communism and defied the power of U.S. presidents during his half-century of rule in Cuba. Nov. 25.

Fritz Weaver, 90. Tony Award-winning actor who played Sherlock Holmes and Shakespearian kings on Broadway while also creating memorable roles on TV and film from “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine” to “Marathon Man.” Nov. 26.

Michael James “Jim” Delligatti, 98. McDonald’s franchisee who created the Big Mac nearly 50 years ago and saw it become perhaps the best-known fast-food sandwich. Nov. 28.

Grant Tinker, 90. He brought new polish to the TV world with beloved shows including “Hill Street Blues” as both a producer and a network boss. Nov. 28.

DECEMBER:

Jayaram Jayalalithaa, 68. South Indian actress who turned to politics and became the highest elected official in the state of Tamil Nadu. Dec. 4.

John Glenn, 95. His 1962 flight as the first U.S. astronaut to orbit the Earth made him an all-American hero and propelled him to a long career in the U.S. Senate. Dec. 8.

Esma Redzepova, 73. One of the most powerful voices in the world of Gypsy music. Dec. 11.

Joe Ligon, 80. Singer and dynamic frontman of the Grammy-winning gospel group Mighty Clouds of Joy. Dec. 11.

E.R. Braithwaite, 104. Guyanese author, educator and diplomat whose years teaching in the slums of London’s East End inspired the international best-seller “To Sir, With Love” and the movie of the same name. Dec. 12.

Alan Thicke, 69. Versatile performer who gained his greatest renown as the beloved dad on the sitcom “Growing Pains.” Dec. 13.

Final goodbye: Some of those who died in 2014

They each turned a moment of violence into a call to action. For James Brady, that moment was when he was shot and wounded by a would-be presidential assassin. For Chung Eun-yong, it was the killings of his two children during a Korean War massacre.

Brady took up a personal campaign for increased gun control after surviving a head wound when a man tried unsuccessfully to kill President Ronald Reagan, for whom Brady was press secretary. Chung began a years-long quest for justice, which eventually prompted the U.S. Army to acknowledge having killed civilian refugees at No Gun Ri.

Brady and Chung, who died within days of each other in August, are among the notables who left the world in 2014.

Others include political figures who catalyzed war and peace and scientists who changed our lives – the inventor of Corningware, for instance. And we lost beloved entertainers, some remembered for bringing audiences decades of smiles and tears and others who left the stage long before their time.

Among the political figures who died in 2014 was Ariel Sharon a hard-charging Israeli general and prime minister whose efforts to reshape the Middle East caused some to call him a war hero and others a war criminal. Another was Marion Barry, the former Washington, D.C., mayor whose accomplishments were often overshadowed by his arrest for drug use.

British politician Tony Benn, former Boston Mayor Thomas Menino, Polish leader Wojciech Jaruzelski and former Georgia president Eduard Shevardnadze also died this year.

Among scientists and innovators was Rostislav Belyakov, the chief designer of the Russian MiG fighter jets, Nobel Prize winner Martin Perl who discovered a subatomic particle and S. Donald Stookey, the Corningware inventor.

A feeling of untimeliness defined several of the deaths in the entertainment arena in 2014.

The suicide of actor and comedian Robin Williams touched off a national conversation about depression. The overdose deaths of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman, model Peaches Geldof and heavy metal frontman Dave Brockie were grim reminders of the scourge of drug use.

Other artists and entertainers included: actors Shirley Temple, Mickey Rooney, Suchitra Sen, Harold Ramis, Lauren Bacall, Ken Takakura and Eli Wallach; musicians Pete Seeger, Sabah, Tommy Ramone, Lorin Maazel, Gustavo Cerati and Big Bank Hank; filmmakers Mike Nichols and Run Run Shaw; radio host Casey Kasem; comedian Joan Rivers; and writers Maya Angelou and Amiri Baraka.

Here is a roll call of some of the people who died in 2014. (Cause of death cited for younger people, if available.)

JANUARY:

Juanita Moore, 99. Groundbreaking actress and an Academy Award nominee for her role as Lana Turner’s black friend in the classic weeper “Imitation of Life.” Jan. 1.

Saul Zaentz, 92. Music producer whose second career as a filmmaker brought him best-picture Academy Awards for “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” “Amadeus” and “The English Patient.” Jan. 3.

Eusebio da Silva Ferreira, 71. Soccer player who was born into poverty in Africa and became one of the world’s top scorers during the 1960s. Jan. 5.

Run Run Shaw, 107. Pioneering Hong Kong movie producer whose studio popularized the kung fu genre that influenced Quentin Tarantino and other Hollywood directors. Jan. 7.

Thomas V. Jones, 93. He was CEO of Northrop Corp. – now known as Northrop Grumman Corp. – for 30 years and took it to the top ranks of aerospace companies while weathering a series of scandals. Jan. 7. Pulmonary fibrosis.

Amiri Baraka, 79. Militant man of letters and tireless agitator whose blues-based, fist-shaking poems, plays and criticism made him a groundbreaking force in American culture. Jan. 9.

Franklin McCain, 73. He helped spark a movement of nonviolent sit-in protests across the South by occupying a segregated Woolworth’s lunch counter in 1960. Jan. 9.

Ariel Sharon, 85. Israeli general and prime minister who was admired and hated for his battlefield exploits and ambitions to reshape the Middle East. Jan. 11.

Russell Johnson, 89. Actor who played “The Professor,” the fix-it man who kept his fellow castaways on TV’s “Gilligan’s Island” supplied with gadgets. Jan. 16.

Hiroo Onoda, 91. Last Japanese imperial soldier to emerge from hiding in a jungle in the Philippines and surrender, 29 years after the end of World War II. Jan. 16.

Suchitra Sen, 82. Legendary Indian actress known for her memorable roles in both Bengali-language and Hindi Bollywood films. Jan. 17.

Jose Emilio Pacheco, 74. He was widely regarded as one of Mexico’s foremost poets and short story writers. Jan. 26.

Pete Seeger, 94. Banjo-picking troubadour who sang for migrant workers, college students and star-struck presidents in a career that introduced generations of Americans to their folk music heritage. Jan. 27.

FEBRUARY:

Maximilian Schell, 83. Austrian-born actor and a fugitive from Adolf Hitler who became a Hollywood favorite and won an Oscar for his role as a defense attorney in “Judgment at Nuremberg.” Feb. 1.

Philip Seymour Hoffman, 46. He won a best actor Oscar in 2006 for his portrayal of writer Truman Capote in “Capote” and created a gallery of other vivid characters, many of them slovenly and slightly dissipated comic figures. Feb. 2. Apparent heroin overdose.

William “Bunny Rugs” Clarke, 65. Husky-voiced lead singer of internationally popular reggae band Third World. Feb. 2. Leukemia.

Joan Mondale, 83. She burnished a reputation as “Joan of Art” for her passionate advocacy for the arts while her husband, Walter, was vice president and a U.S. ambassador. Feb. 3.

Ralph Kiner, 91. He slugged his way to the baseball Hall of Fame and then enjoyed a half-century career as a popular broadcaster. Feb. 6.

Els Borst, 81. Former Dutch health minister who drafted the nation’s landmark 2002 law permitting euthanasia. Feb. 10.

Shirley Temple, 85. Dimpled, curly-haired child star who sang, danced, sobbed and grinned her way into the hearts of Depression-era moviegoers. Feb. 10.

Arvella Schuller, 84. She helped her pastor husband found the Crystal Cathedral megachurch in Southern California and “Hour of Power” televangelism program seen by millions around the globe. Feb. 11.

Sid Caesar, 91. Prodigiously talented pioneer of TV comedy who paired with Imogene Coca in sketches that became classics and who inspired a generation of famous writers. Feb. 12.

Ralph Waite, 85. He played the kind-and-steady patriarch of a tight-knit rural Southern family on the TV series “The Waltons.” Feb. 13.

Mavis Gallant, 91. Montreal-born writer who carved out an international reputation as a master short-story author while living in Paris for decades. Feb. 18.

Maria von Trapp, 99. Last surviving member and second-eldest daughter of the musical family whose escape from Nazi-occupied Austria was the basis for “The Sound of Music.” Feb. 18.

Walter D. Ehlers, 92. During the D-Day invasion, he accomplished awe-inspiring acts of bravery, earning a Medal of Honor for knocking out two German machine-gun nests and saving countless Allied soldiers’ lives. Feb. 20.

Alice Herz-Sommer, 110. Believed to be the oldest Holocaust survivor. Feb. 23.

Harold Ramis, 69. Comedy actor, director and writer best known for his roles in movies such as “Ghostbusters” and “Stripes.” Feb. 24.

Henry Casso, 82. Longtime civil rights leader in New Mexico who worked his way out of an orphanage to become a noted educational scholar and a founder of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. Feb. 25.

Huber Matos Benitez, 95. He helped lead the Cuban Revolution as one of Fidel Castro’s key lieutenants before his efforts to resign from the burgeoning communist government landed him in prison for 20 years. Feb. 27.

Rostislav Belyakov, 94. Chief designer of the Russian MiG fighter jets. Feb. 28.

MARCH:

Justin Kaplan, 88. Cultural historian with a taste for troublemaking who wrote a Pulitzer Prize-winning biography of Mark Twain and spiced the popular canon as general editor of Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations. March 2.

Sherwin Nuland, 83. Medical ethicist who opposed assisted suicide and wrote an award-winning book about death called “How We Die.” March 3.

Sheila MacRae, 92. Veteran stage, film and TV performer best known for playing Alice Kramden in the 1960s re-creation of “The Honeymooners.” March 6.

William Clay Ford, 88. Owner of the Detroit Lions and last surviving grandchild of automotive pioneer Henry Ford. March 9.

Mohammad Qasim Fahim, 57. Afghanistan’s vice president and a leading commander in the alliance that fought the Taliban who was later accused with other warlords of targeting civilian areas during the country’s civil war. March 9.

Melba Hernandez, 92. She helped Fidel Castro launch his revolutionary battle with a failed 1953 attack on a military barracks and was later named a “heroine of the Cuban Revolution.” March 9.

Joe McGinniss, 71. Adventurous, news-making author and reporter who skewered the marketing of Richard Nixon in “The Selling of the President 1968” and tracked his personal journey from sympathizer to scourge of convicted killer Jeffrey MacDonald in “Fatal Vision.” March 10.

Tony Benn, 88. Committed British socialist who irritated and fascinated Britons through a political career spanning more than five decades and who renounced his aristocratic title rather than leave the House of Commons. March 14.

Mitch Leigh, 86. Advertising jingle writer with an entrepreneurial side whose debut attempt at writing music for a Broadway show became the instant hit “Man of La Mancha” and earned him a Tony Award. March 16.

L’Wren Scott, believed to be 49. She left her small-town Utah home as a teenager to become a model in Paris, then a top Hollywood stylist and finally a high-end fashion designer best known as the longtime girlfriend of Mick Jagger. March 17. Apparent suicide.

Rachel “Bunny” Mellon, 103. Arts and fashion patron and political benefactor who funneled hundreds of thousands of dollars to former presidential candidate John Edwards that was used to hide his mistress. March 17.

Robert S. Strauss, 95. Dealmaker, political powerbroker and former Democratic Party chairman whose counsel also was prized by Republicans. March 19.

Fred Phelps Sr., 84. Fiery founder of a small Kansas church who led hate-filled protests that blamed almost everything, including the deaths of U.S. soldiers, on America’s tolerance for gay people. March 19.

Ignatius Zakka Iwas, 80. Patriarch of the Syriac Orthodox Church, he was the leader of one of world’s oldest Christian sects. March 21.

Adolfo Suarez, 81. Spain’s first democratically elected prime minister after decades of right-wing rule under Gen. Francisco Franco. March 23.

Dave Brockie, 50. Better known as “Oderus Urungus,” he fronted the alien-costumed heavy metal band GWAR during graphic and fake-blood-soaked stage shows. March 23. Accidental heroin overdose.

Jeremiah Denton, 89. Former Alabama senator who survived 7 1/2 years as a prisoner of war in North Vietnam and alerted the U.S. military to conditions there when he blinked the word “torture” in Morse code during a television interview. March 28.

APRIL:

Anja Niedringhaus, 48. Courageous, Pulitzer prize-winning Associated Press photographer who covered everything from sports to war. April 4. Shot to death in Afghanistan.

Otis McDonald, 80. Lead plaintiff in a lawsuit that prompted the U.S. Supreme Court decision that forced Chicago to abandon its 28-year ban on handguns. April 4.

Peter Matthiessen, 86. Rich man’s son who spurned a life of leisure and embarked on extraordinary quests while producing such acclaimed books as “The Snow Leopard” and “At Play in the Fields of the Lord.” April 5.

Mickey Rooney, 93. Pint-size actor and all-around talent whose more than 80-year career spanned silent comedies, Shakespeare, Judy Garland musicals, Andy Hardy stardom, television and the Broadway theater. April 6.

Peaches Geldof, 25. Model and media personality who was a daughter of Irish singer Bob Geldof and member of a talented, troubled family who grew up in the glare of Britain’s tabloid press. April 7. Heroin overdose.

Arthur Napoleon Raymond Robinson, 87. Former Trinidad and Tobago prime minister who was held hostage for days and shot during a bloody 1990 coup attempt. April 9.

Phyllis Frelich, 70. Tony Award-winning deaf actress who starred in the Broadway version of “Children of a Lesser God.” April 10.

Kevin Sharp, 43. Country music singer who recorded multiple chart-topping songs and survived cancer. April 19. Complications from stomach surgeries and digestive issues.

Rubin “Hurricane” Carter, 76. Boxer whose wrongful murder conviction became an international symbol of racial injustice. April 20.

Win Tin, 85. Journalist who became Myanmar’s longest-serving political prisoner after challenging military rule by co-founding the National League for Democracy. April 21.

Conrado Marrero, 102. Diminutive Cuban right-hander who pitched for the Washington Senators in the 1950s and in 2011 became the oldest living former Major League Baseball player. April 23.

Herbert Hyman, 82. He founded The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf in the 1960s and saw the coffee chain grow to hundreds of stores around the world. April 28.

Bob Hoskins, 71. British actor whose varied career ranged from noir drama “Mona Lisa” to animated fantasy “Who Framed Roger Rabbit.” April 29.

Al Feldstein, 88. His 28 years at the helm of Mad magazine transformed the satirical publication into a pop culture institution. April 29.

Walter R. Walsh, 106. He captured gangsters as an FBI agent in the 1930s and went on to train Marine Corps snipers and become the longest-lived Olympian. April 29.

MAY:

Billy Frank Jr., 83. Tribal fisherman who led the “fish wars” that restored fishing rights and helped preserve a way of life for American Indians in the Northwest. May 5.

Cornelius Gurlitt, 81. Reclusive German collector whose long-secret hoard of well over 1,000 artworks triggered an international uproar over the fate of art looted by the Nazis. May 6.

Jeb Stuart Magruder, 79. Watergate conspirator-turned-minister who claimed in later years to have heard President Richard Nixon order the infamous break-in. May 11.

H.R. Giger, 74. Swiss artist who designed the creature in Ridley Scott’s sci-fi horror classic “Alien.” May 12.

Jerry Vale, 83. Beloved crooner known for his high-tenor voice and romantic songs in the 1950s and early `60s. May 18.

Don Meyer, 69. One of the winningest coaches in college basketball who came back from a near-fatal car accident and liver cancer before closing out his career. May 18.

Gordon Willis, 82. One of Hollywood’s most celebrated and influential cinematographers, nicknamed “The Prince of Darkness” for his subtle but indelible touch on such releases as “The Godfather,” `’Annie Hall” and “All the President’s Men.” May 18.

Jack Brabham, 88. Three-time Formula One champion who famously pushed his car to the finish line to claim his first season title. May 19.

Sante Kimes, 79. She and her son made up a notorious grifter team convicted of the murders of a wealthy widow in New York and a businessman in Los Angeles. May 19.

Ruth Ziolkowski, 87. She carried on her late husband’s dream of honoring Native Americans by carving the massive likeness of warrior Crazy Horse into the Black Hills in South Dakota. May 21.

Ricky Grigg, 77. Former top-ranked big-wave surfer and oceanographer whose work confirmed one of Charles Darwin’s theories about the origin of tropical islands. May 21.

Jaime Lusinchi, 89. Former Venezuelan president who struggled to tame an economic crisis sparked by plunging oil prices in the late 1980s and then saw his reputation tarnished by allegations of corruption after leaving office. May 21.

Wojciech Jaruzelski, 90. Communist leader who imposed harsh military rule on Poland in 1981 in an attempt to crush the pro-democracy Solidarity movement but later allowed reforms that ended up dismantling the regime. May 25.

Bunny Yeager, 85. Model turned pin-up photographer who helped jump-start the career of then-unknown Bettie Page. May 25.

Manuel Uribe, 48. Mexican man once listed as the world’s heaviest human at 1,230 pounds (560 kilograms). May 26.

Maya Angelou, 86. Author and poet who rose from poverty, segregation and violence to become a force on stage, screen and the printed page. May 28.

Lewis Katz, 72. He built his fortune in New York parking lots, billboards and cable TV, and went on to buy the NBA’s New Jersey Nets, NHL’s New Jersey Devils and The Philadelphia Inquirer. May 31. Plane crash.

Martha Hyer, 89. Oscar-nominated actress who starred alongside the likes of Frank Sinatra and Humphrey Bogart, and later gained notoriety for her extravagant lifestyle. May 31.

JUNE:

Ann B. Davis, 88. Emmy-winning actress who became America’s best-known housekeeper as the devoted Alice Nelson of TV’s “Brady Bunch.” June 1.

Alexander Shulgin, 88. Respected chemist famed for dusting off a decades-old recipe for the psychedelic drug ecstasy. June 2.

Chester Nez, 93. Last of the original group of Navajo Code Talkers who stumped the Japanese during World War II. June 4.

Eric Hill, 86. His effort to entertain his son with a simple drawing of a mischievous dog named Spot blossomed into a series of children’s books that have sold more than 60 million copies. June 6.

Bob Welch, 57. 1990 AL Cy Young Award winner with the Oakland Athletics and the last major leaguer to win at least 25 games in a season. June 9.

Ruby Dee, 91. Acclaimed actress and civil rights activist whose versatile career spanned stage, radio television and film. June 11.

Chuck Noll, 82. Hall of Fame coach who won a record four Super Bowl titles with the Pittsburgh Steelers. June 13.

Casey Kasem, 82. Radio broadcaster with a cheerful manner and gentle voice who became the king of the top 40 countdown with a syndicated show that ran for decades. June 15.

Daniel Keyes, 86. Author whose novel “Flowers for Algernon” became a classroom staple that explored the treatment of the mentally disabled and the ethics of manipulating human intelligence. June 15.

Tony Gwynn, 54. Hall of Famer whose sweet left-handed swing made him one of San Diego’s best-loved athletes and earned him the nickname “Mr. Padre.” June 16. Cancer.

Stanley Marsh 3, 76. Texas businessman, artist and eccentric (he used 3 rather than the conventional III after his name) whose partially buried row of Cadillacs became a roadside tourist attraction. June 17.

Stephanie Kwolek, 90. Pioneering female chemist at DuPont who invented the exceedingly tough fibers widely used in Kevlar body armor. June 18.

Avraham Shalom, 86. Former director of Israel’s Shin Bet security service who led the agency through some of its greatest achievements before resigning in disgrace. June 19.

Steve Rossi, 82. Half of the comedy duo Allen & Rossi, which became a favorite on TV variety shows. June 22.

Eli Wallach, 98. Raspy-voiced character actor who starred in dozens of movies and Broadway plays and earned film immortality as a quick-on-the-draw bandit in the classic Western “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.” June 24.

Howard H. Baker Jr., 88. Moderate Republican ex-senator who, during the 1973 Watergate hearings, sought to learn Richard Nixon’s role by asking what the president knew and when he knew it. June 26.

Meshach Taylor, 67. He played a lovable ex-convict surrounded by Southern belles on the sitcom “Designing Women” and appeared in numerous other TV and film roles. June 28.

Philip Lutzenkirchen, 23. Former Auburn tight end and a fan favorite who played on the 2010 national championship team. June 29. Car crash.

JULY:

Stephen Gaskin, 79. Counterculture visionary who led a caravan of hippies from California to establish one of the longest lasting U.S. communes in rural Middle Tennessee and later sought the Green Party nomination for president. July 1.

David Greenglass, 92. He served 10 years in prison for his role in the most explosive atomic spying case of the Cold War and gave testimony that sent his brother-in-law and sister, Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, to the electric chair. July 1.

Louis Zamperini, 97. Olympic distance runner who, during World War II, survived 47 days on a raft in the Pacific after his bomber crashed, then endured two years in Japanese prison camps and hero of the book and movie “Unbroken.” July 2.

Richard Mellon Scaife, 82. Billionaire Mellon banking heir who published the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review and funded libertarian and conservative political causes. July 4.

Rev. Gerald Robinson, 76. Roman Catholic priest convicted of killing a nun inside a chapel in 1980. July 4.

Metropolitan Volodymyr, 78. Head of Ukraine’s Orthodox Church who was credited with stabilizing the church. July 5.

Eduard Shevardnadze, 86. Groundbreaking Soviet foreign minister and later the president of an independent Georgia. July 7.

John Seigenthaler, 86. He edited The Tennessean newspaper, helped shape USA Today and worked for civil rights during the Kennedy administration. July 11.

Tommy Ramone, 65. Co-founder of the seminal punk band the Ramones and last surviving member of the original group. July 11.

Ken Gray, 89. He represented southern Illinois in Congress and earned the nickname the “Prince of Pork” for bringing $7 billion in projects to his district. July 12.

Lorin Maazel, 84. World-renowned conductor whose career included seven years at the helm of the New York Philharmonic. July 12.

Alice Coachman Davis, 90. First black woman to win an Olympic gold medal. July 14.

Elaine Stritch, 89. Brash theater performer whose gravelly, gin-laced voice and impeccable comic timing made her a Broadway legend. July 17.

James Garner, 86. Actor whose whimsical style in the 1950s TV Western “Maverick” led to a career in TV and films such as “The Rockford Files” and his Oscar-nominated “Murphy’s Romance.” July 19.

Dan Borislow, 52. Inventor of magicJack and a pioneer in developing phone calls over the Internet. July 21.

Paul Schell, 76. Former Seattle mayor who led the city during the World Trade Organization protests in 1999. July 27.

Theodore “Dutch” VanKirk, 93. Last surviving member of the crew that dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, hastening the end of World War II and forcing the world into the atomic age. July 28.

Robert Drew, 90. Pioneer of the modern documentary who in “Primary” and other films mastered the intimate style known as cinema verite and schooled a generation of influential directors. July 30.

Dick Smith, 92. Oscar-winning “Godfather of Makeup” who amused, fascinated and terrified moviegoers by devising unforgettable transformations for Marlon Brando in “The Godfather” and Linda Blair in “The Exorcist,” among many others. July 30.

AUGUST:

Chung Eun-yong, 91. Ex-policeman whose half-century quest for justice for his two slain children led the U.S. Army in 2001 to acknowledge the Korean War refugee massacre at No Gun Ri. Aug. 1.

James Brady, 73. Affable, witty press secretary who survived a devastating head wound in the 1981 assassination attempt on President Ronald Reagan, then undertook a personal crusade for gun control. Aug. 4.

Jesse Steinfeld, 87. Doctor who became the first surgeon general ever forced out of office by the president after he campaigned hard against the dangers of smoking during the Richard Nixon era. Aug. 5.

Marilyn Burns, 65. Actress perhaps best known as the heroine in the 1974 horror classic “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre.” Aug. 5.

Menahem Golan, 85. Israeli filmmaker who built an empire on the back of brawny men beating others senseless across a host of 1980s action films. Aug. 8.

Robin Williams, 63. Academy Award winner and comic supernova whose explosions of pop culture riffs and impressions dazzled audiences for decades. Aug. 11. Apparent suicide.

Lauren Bacall, 89. Slinky, sultry-voiced actress who created on-screen magic with Humphrey Bogart in “To Have and Have Not” and “The Big Sleep” and off-screen magic in one of Hollywood’s most storied marriages. Aug. 12.

Simone Camilli, 35. Associated Press video journalist. Aug. 13. Killed in the Gaza Strip when leftover ordnance exploded.

Jay Adams, 53. Colorful rebel who helped transform skateboarding from a simple street pastime into one of the world’s most spectacular sports. Aug. 14. Heart attack.

James Jeffords, 80. Former Vermont senator, who in 2001 tipped control of the Senate when he quit the Republican Party to become an independent. Aug. 18.

Don Pardo, 96. TV and radio announcer whose booming baritone became as much a part of the cultural landscape as the shows he touted, including “Saturday Night Live.” Aug. 18.

Dinu Patriciu, 64. Politician from Romania’s early post-communist years whose later career as an oil tycoon was marred by legal troubles. Aug. 19.

B.K.S. Iyengar, 95. Indian yoga guru who helped popularize yoga around the world and wrote 14 books on the subject. Aug. 20.

Robert Hansen, 75. Convicted Alaska serial killer who gained the nickname of “the Butcher Baker” for abducting women in the wilderness during the state’s oil pipeline construction boom in the 1970s. Aug. 21.

Gerald One Feather, 76. Legendary Oglala Sioux leader, former tribal president and tireless advocate for educational opportunities. Aug. 21.

Philippine de Rothschild, 80. Energetic, self-certain grande dame of Bordeaux wine who halted an acting career to run vineyards owned by the family dynasty. Aug. 22.

Richard Attenborough, 90. Actor and Oscar-winning director whose film career on both sides of the camera spanned 60 years. Aug. 24.

William Greaves, 87. Emmy-winning co-host and executive producer of a groundbreaking television news program and a prolific filmmaker whose subjects ranged from Muhammad Ali to the Harlem Renaissance to the black middle class. Aug. 25.

John A. Walker Jr., 77. Former American sailor convicted during the Cold War of leading a family spy ring for the Soviet Union. Aug. 28.

SEPTEMBER:

Andrew Madoff, 48. Bernard Madoff’s last surviving son, he turned his father in and insisted he had been duped into believing history’s most notorious Ponzi king was an honest financier. Sept. 3. Cancer.

Joan Rivers, 81. Raucous, acid-tongued comedian who crashed the male-dominated realm of late-night talk shows and turned Hollywood red carpets into danger zones for badly dressed celebrities. Sept. 4. Fatal complication during a medical procedure.

Gustavo Cerati, 55. Argentine rock star who was the former lead singer of the band Soda Stereo, among the most popular groups in the Spanish-speaking world in the 1980s and `90s. Sept. 4.

S. Truett Cathy, 93. Billionaire founder of the privately held Chick-fil-A restaurant chain. Sept. 8.

Emilio Botin, 79. Spanish banking magnate who built the country’s Banco Santander into a global financial giant and was widely seen as the nation’s most influential business leader. Sept. 9.

Bob Suter, 57. Member of the “Miracle On Ice” team that won the Olympic gold medal in 1980 and the father of Minnesota Wild star Ryan Suter. Sept. 9.

Richard Kiel, 74. Towering actor best known for portraying steel-toothed villain Jaws in a pair of James Bond films. Sept. 10.

Rev. Ian Paisley, 88. Protestant firebrand who devoted his life to thwarting compromise with Catholics in Northern Ireland only to become a peacemaker in his twilight years. Sept. 12.

Thomas Hale Boggs Jr., 73. Son of congressional royalty who evolved into a top-tier lobbyist and prolific Democratic fundraiser and embodied what it meant to have Washington clout. Sept. 15.

Will Radcliff, 74. He built a multimillion-dollar global business from flavored, icy Slush Puppie drinks. Sept. 18.

Polly Bergen, 84. Emmy-winning actress and singer who in a long career played the terrorized wife in the original “Cape Fear” and the first woman president in “Kisses for My President.” Sept. 20.

Mike Harari, 87. Israeli secret service agent who played a major role in planning Mossad’s revenge attacks against Palestinian militants implicated in the 1972 Munich massacre of the country’s Olympics team. Sept. 21.

Deborah Mitford, 94. Dowager duchess of Devonshire and the last of the witty, unconventional Mitford sisters. Sept. 24.

Lily McBeth, 80. Teacher whose battles with school boards in conservative areas of New Jersey made her a reluctant symbol of the transgender rights movement. Sept. 24.

James Traficant, 73. Colorful Ohio politician whose conviction for taking bribes and kickbacks made him only the second person to be expelled from Congress since the Civil War. Sept. 27.

Floyd “Creeky” Creekmore, 98. Former Montana rancher who held the record as the world’s oldest performing clown. Sept. 27.

Geraldine “Jerrie” Mock, 88. First female pilot to fly solo around the world. Sept. 30.

Martin Perl, 87. Nobel Prize-winning physicist from Stanford University who discovered a subatomic particle known as the tau lepton. Sept. 30.

OCTOBER:

Comer Cottrell, 82. Black hair-care entrepreneur who made millions with a cheap kit that brought the glossy celebrity Jheri curl into the homes of average African Americans. Oct. 3.

Jean-Claude Duvalier, 63. He presided over what was widely acknowledged as a corrupt, brutal regime as the self-proclaimed “president for life” of Haiti until an uprising sent him into a 25-year exile. Oct. 4. Heart attack.

Marian Seldes, 86. Tony Award-winning star of “A Delicate Balance” who was a teacher of Kevin Kline and Robin Williams, a muse to playwright Edward Albee and a Guinness Book of World Records holder for most consecutive performances. Oct. 6.

Jan Hooks, 57. Former “Saturday Night Live” cast member. Oct. 9.

Tim Hauser, 72. Founder and singer of the Grammy-winning vocal troupe The Manhattan Transfer. Oct. 16.

Oscar de la Renta, 82. Worldly gentleman designer who shaped the wardrobe of socialites, first ladies and Hollywood stars for more than four decades. Oct. 20.

Gough Whitlam, 98. Flamboyant Australian prime minister and controversial social reformer whose grip on power was cut short by a bitter constitutional crisis. Oct. 21.

Ben Bradlee, 93. Hard-charging editor who guided The Washington Post through its Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of the Watergate scandal and invigorated its newsroom for more than two decades. Oct. 21.

Joan Quigley, 87. Astrologer who helped determine President Ronald Reagan’s schedule. Oct. 21.

John “Bull” Bramlett, 73. Former professional football and baseball player who was nicknamed the “Meanest Man in Football.” Oct. 23.

Jack Broughton, 89. Decorated Air Force fighter pilot who flew more than 200 missions in Korea and Vietnam and later became an outspoken critic of the White House and military leaders. Oct. 24.

Marcia Strassman, 66. She played Gabe Kaplan’s wife, Julie, on the 1970s sitcom “Welcome Back, Kotter.” Oct. 24.

Jack Bruce, 71. British musician best known as the bass player and vocalist of the power blues trio Cream. Oct. 25.

Michael Sata, 77. Longtime opposition leader who was finally elected president of Zambia in 2011. Oct. 28.

Harold Gary Morse, 77. He transformed his father’s cluster of a few hundred mobile homes in central Florida into the gigantic retirement utopia The Villages. Oct. 29.

Thomas Menino, 71. Boston’s longest-serving mayor whose mumbling and occasional bumbling belied his political ingenuity and endeared him to a city whose skyline he helped reshape. Oct. 30.

NOVEMBER:

Tom Sneddon, 73. Former district attorney who sought twice to try Michael Jackson on child molestation charges. Nov. 1.

Veljko Kadijevic, 88. Former Yugoslav general who was accused of war crimes in Croatia and who fled to Russia to avoid testifying at a U.N. tribunal. Nov. 2.

Tom Magliozzi, 77. He was one half of the brother duo who hosted National Public Radio’s “Car Talk,” where they bantered with callers and commiserated over their car problems. Nov. 3.

S. Donald Stookey, 99. He was the scientist who forever changed cooking with the invention of CorningWare, a versatile glass found in millions of American kitchens. Nov. 4.

Raymond Almiran Montgomery, 78. Author of the popular children’s book series “Choose Your Own Adventure.” Nov. 9.

Tomas Young, 34. Wounded Iraq War veteran who was an outspoken critic of the conflict and the subject of the 2007 documentary “Body of War.” Nov. 10.

Ken Takakura, 83. Craggy-faced star known for playing outlaws and stoic heroes in scores of Japanese films. Nov. 10.

Big Bank Hank, 57. Member of the pioneering hip-hop group the Sugarhill Gang responsible for one of the most popular rap songs of all time, “Rapper’s Delight.” Nov. 11.

Marge Roukema, 85. New Jersey Republican who spent more than two decades in Congress sparring regularly with ideologues within her party. Nov. 12.

Jane Byrne, 81. She capitalized on Chicago’s slow reaction to a snowstorm to score one of the biggest election upsets in the city’s history and become its first and only female mayor. Nov. 14.

John T. Downey, 84. Former CIA agent who survived more than 20 years in Chinese prisons during the Cold War before becoming a Connecticut judge. Nov. 17.

Mike Nichols, 83. Director of matchless versatility who brought fierce wit, caustic social commentary and wicked absurdity to such film, TV and stage hits as “The Graduate,” “Angels in America” and “Monty Python’s Spamalot.” Nov. 19.

Maria del Rosario Cayetana Fitz-James Stuart y Silva, 88. The Duchess of Alba, she was one of Spain’s wealthiest and most colorful aristocrats and recognized as the world’s most titled noble. Nov. 19.

Marion Barry, 78. Former District of Columbia mayor whose four terms were overshadowed by his 1990 arrest after being caught on videotape smoking crack cocaine. Nov. 23.

Sabah, 87. Lebanese singer and actress who was an icon of Arab music. Nov. 26.

Roberto Gomez Bolanos, 85. Iconic Mexican comedian who wrote and played the boy television character “El Chavo del Ocho” that defined a generation for millions of Latin American children. Nov. 28.

Anthony Marshall, 90. His aristocratic life as philanthropist Brooke Astor’s only child unraveled as he was convicted of raiding her fortune. Nov. 30.

DECEMBER:

Dennis Walaker, 73. As mayor of Fargo, North Dakota, he was known for leading the state’s largest city through several successful fights against the Red River. Dec. 2.

Herman Badillo, 85. Bronx politician who became the first person born in Puerto Rico to become a U.S. congressman. Dec. 3.

Queen Fabiola, 86. She was inseparable from her husband, the late King Baudouin, and popular across much of Belgium. Dec. 5.

Ernest Brace, 83. Civilian captured during the Vietnam War while flying supplies for the CIA who later tapped code through a wall to fellow prisoner John McCain. Dec. 5.

Ralph Baer, 92. Video game pioneer who created both the precursor to “Pong” and the electronic memory game Simon and led the team that developed the first home video game console. Dec. 6.

Larry J. Cano, 90. Founder of the El Torito restaurant chain who helped popularize guacamole, fajitas and margaritas with the U.S. masses. Dec. 10.

Norman Bridwell, 86. Illustrator whose story about a girl and her puppy marked the birth of the supersized franchise Clifford the Big Red Dog. Dec. 12.

David Garth, 84. Political adviser who spearheaded creation of the modern political TV commercial and helped elect governors, senators and mayors. Dec. 15.

Mickey Rooney: 5 memorable roles

Mickey Rooney might be best remembered for his ceaseless ups and downs, his dramatic failures and his many comebacks. But Rooney’s roller-coaster melodrama – he was married eight times and quickly spent the fortune he amassed – wouldn’t have mattered if he hadn’t also had genuine, enduring talent.

In the late 1930s and early 1940s, while under contract for MGM, Rooney was one of the most popular stars on the planet. At just 19, he was the top box-office draw.

In Rooney’s subsequent decades, things would rarely come as easily as his early stardom. But across movies, Broadway and television, his manic energy rarely flagged. Rooney, who died Sunday at age 93, remained working into his 90s, still driven to “put on a show.”

Here are five of Rooney’s most memorable movie roles:

– “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” (1935) – The production of Max Reinhardt and William Dieterle’s Shakespeare adaptation had to be rearranged after Rooney broke his leg while skiing, enraging Warner Bros. head Jack Warner. But as the mischievous sprite Puck, Rooney (who did the play on stage before the movie) excelled in the dreamy film and it remains one of his finest and enchanting performances.

– “A Family Affair” (1937) – It’s the film that birthed Rooney’s most famous role, Andy Hardy. Rooney would play Hardy, an all-American trouble-making boy, 14 more times over the next decade and again in the attempted revival “Andy Hardy Comes Home” in 1958. The films were hits. But while Rooney was portraying an idealized American home – chasing girls (Judy Garland in three films) and getting lectures from his judge father (Lionel Barrymore in “A Family Affair”) – the young actor was leading the more tempestuous life of a child star.

– “Boy’s Town” (1938) – Spencer Tracy starred as the kindly priest Father Edward J. Flanagan, who ran a home for underprivileged boys. But Rooney shared top billing with Tracy, playing the school bully and pool shark, Whitey Marsh, who – with maximum corniness – is reformed in the end. For his performance, Rooney won a special Juvenile Oscar, an honor that was given to performers under the age of 18 from the 1930s to the 1960s, starting with Shirley Temple.

– “Babes in Arms” (1939) – This big-screen version of the Broadway musical also paired Rooney and Garland. Rooney earned his first lead actor Oscar nomination for the film, which showcased his song-and-dance talent with numbers like “The Lady Is a Tramp” and “Good Morning,” (later done in “Singin’ in the Rain”).

– “National Velvet” (1944) – As a former jockey (a common role for the diminutive Rooney), the actor starred opposite an 11-year-old Elizabeth Taylor in her screen debut. The adaption of Enid Bagnold’s tale was Rooney’s last film before heading to war, a rare two-year gap in his otherwise constant output.

Legendary LGBT activist Vernita Gray, famed gay hater Fred Phelps leave starkly different legacies

When Vernita Gray died in her home in Chicago on March 18, family members knew no traditional memorial service could accommodate all those who’d want to share their love, express their thanks and honor the legendary gay rights activist.

And so, on March 31, Gray, who was an equality advocate before most of America had heard about Stonewall or gay liberation, was remembered in a “celebration of extraordinary life” at Chicago’s Goodman Theatre.

When the Rev. Fred Phelps, Sr., died in hospice in Shawnee County, Kan., on March 19, it seemed there was no space large enough to accommodate the number of people who wanted to protest his funeral and then dance on his grave.

Phelps was as despised as Gray was revered. 

If justice is served, in time, Gray, who was 65 when she died of cancer, will be remembered as a vital author of the story of equality and Phelps but a footnote.

Phelps was 84 when he died of an undisclosed illness. He’d been sick for months, but remained estranged from family and, according to a son, cut off from the Westboro Baptist Church, the right-wing church he founded in Topeka, Kan.

Phelps was widely known for his vulgar “God hates fags” campaign, which sent him and a small band of worshippers around the country to protest at military funerals, government buildings, corporate headquarters and celebrity events. With their street-style crusade, they claimed terrorist attacks, war, natural disasters and diseases were God’s punishment for America’s increasing tolerance for homosexuality and abortion.

Phelps was born in Mississippi in 1929. He was a drop-out from Bob Jones University in 1947, but he eventually earned a law degree from Washburn University and was a civil rights lawyer until he was disbarred in 1979 for perjury.

He was making headlines as a street preacher as early as 1951 and was arrested multiple times over the years for “assault, battery, threats, trespassing, disorderly conduct and contempt of court,” according to the Southern Poverty Law Center, which classifies Westboro as a hate organization.

In the 1980s, Phelps launched his anti-gay crusade, focusing on AIDS-related deaths. He came to widespread national attention when he and his followers — mostly family members — picketed the funeral of Matthew Shepard, the gay 21-year-old University of Wyoming college student who died after a savage beating by two young men in 1998.

After Phelps announced his intention to picket Shepard’s funeral, LGBT activists organized to protect the Shepard family and mourners — they dressed as angels and served as a shield from the protesters in Laramie, Wyo.

Shepard’s mother, Judy, released a statement on March 20: “Regarding the passing of Fred Phelps, (husband) Dennis and I know how solemn these moments are for anyone who loses a loved one. Out of respect for all people and our desire to erase hate, we’ve decided not to comment further.”

There were others in the LGBT community who, trying to give substance to his obituary, said Phelps and his circus ironically helped drive equality. 

“He has brought along allies who are horrified by the hate,” said longtime activist Cathy Renna, who helped organize the response to Westboro in Laramie. “So his legacy will be exactly the opposite of what he dreamed.”

James Esseks, director of the LGBT Project at the American Civil Liberties Union, said, “He would show up with his extreme anti-gay views and a bunch of people in the middle would think, ‘If that’s what it means to be anti-gay, I want no part of it.’”

Others offered far less tempered remarks after Phelps’ death.

In the end, there was no funeral for the preacher but instead, an ambiguous tweet from the church Phelps founded and made infamous: “Westboro Baptist Church thanks God for Fred Phelps Sr.’s passing.” 

Gray’s life intersected with Phelps’ in Chicago, where she celebrated with pride in 1998 and he picketed, shouting obscenities through a bullhorn in Boystown.

By then, Gray was an inductee into the Chicago LGBT Hall of Fame and had spent decades working for equality. 

Gray, according to her Hall of Fame biography, attended Woodstock and returned to Chicago ready to organize. She hosted support groups for lesbians in her home, where she also installed a hotline — the number was FBI-LIST — for gay youth.

“Interest in the support groups and hotline was so intense that Gray eventually had to vacate her apartment to obtain a modicum of privacy and peace of mind,” the biography read.

In the early 1970s, she was active in organizing the first Lesbian Caucus of the Gay Liberation group and helped launch the first Chicago lesbian newspaper.

For a time, she ran the Sol Sands restaurant and a company that created audio-visual materials for children, but much of her professional work was with the Cook County state’s attorney’s office, where she worked 18 years assisting victims and witnesses.

Gray advocated for marriage equality long before many other activists saw it as a possibility. Last October, she wed longtime partner Patricia Ewert, and they became the first same-sex couple to marry in Illinois.

In a remembrance, Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn called Gray a “passionate and driven advocate for equality in Illinois.”

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel said she was “an inspiration to all who crossed her path, from President Obama, who knew her by name, to the victims of violence she comforted and the young people for whom she was a fierce advocate. Her legacy can be felt in the many institutions she supported and by every LGBT couple in Illinois who is now free to marry the person they love.”

Final goodbye: Roll call of some who died in 2013

Both were mold-breaking former heads of state who reshaped their own countries and the world. Nelson Mandela, revered for his efforts to end apartheid in South Africa, and Margaret Thatcher, the “Iron Lady” who imposed her will on Britain’s politics and economy, were among notables who died in 2013.

Mandela, who died Dec. 5 at age 95, was considered a master of forgiveness. He became South Africa’s first black president after spending 27 years in prison for championing equality against the white-minority government, and he inspired the world by seeking a relatively peaceful transition of power.

As Britain’s only female prime minister, Thatcher ruled for 11 years and showed an unshakable faith in the free market, leaving behind a leaner government and more prosperous nation. While she had fierce critics, praise for her leadership came in from around the world when she died in April at 87.

Other political figures who died this year included Venezuelan leader Hugo Chavez, former Italian premier Giulio Andreotti, Poland’s ex-prime minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki, France’s Pierre Mauroy, and Hungary’s Gyula Horn, prominent past mayors of New York and Beijing, Ed Koch and Chen Xitong, and former U.S. Sens. Frank Lautenberg and Harry F. Byrd.

Also dying in 2013 was a man whose invention you may hold as you read this. Doug Engelbart, who died in July, invented the computer mouse, among other things.

Others from the world of science and technology who died this year included  the Manhattan Project’s Donald F. Hornig, Nobel Prize winners Frederick Sanger, Robert Edwards and Kenneth Wilson, audio pioneers Ray Dolby and Amar Bose and astronauts C. Gordon Fullerton and Scott Carpenter.

In the arena of arts and entertainment, this year saw the death of one who was hugely influential though not technically an entertainer at all. Roger Ebert, who died in April, was America’s most popular film critic, telling audiences which movies to see or avoid with his famous thumbs-up or thumbs-down reviews.

Others from the entertainment world who died this year included actors James Gandolfini, Peter O’Toole, Jane Kean, Annette Funicello, Jean Stapleton, Bonnie Franklin, Cory Monteith, Frank Thornton and Conrad Bain, as well as swimming star Esther Williams and Bollywood villain Pran.

Musicians included George Jones, Van Cliburn, Lou Reed, Donald Byrd, Ray Manzarek, Bebo Valdes, Mindy McCready, Chrissy Amphle and Chris Kelly. Among others: writer Tom Clancy, director Nagisa Oshima and ballerina Maria Tallchief.

Here is a roll call of some of the people who died in 2013.

JANUARY:

Patti Page, 85. Singer who stumbled across “Tennessee Waltz” and made it one of the best-selling recordings ever. Jan. 1.

Gerda Lerner, 92. Pioneer in the field of women’s history and a founding member of the National Organization for Women. Jan. 2.

Ned Wertimer, 89. He played Ralph the Doorman on all 11 seasons of the CBS sitcom “The Jeffersons.” Jan. 2.

Huell Howser, 67. Homespun host of public television’s popular “California’s Gold” travelogues. Jan. 6.

Evan S. Connell, 88. Author, whose literary explorations ranged from Depression-era Kansas City in the twin novels “Mrs. Bridge” and “Mr. Bridge” to Custer’s last stand in “Son of the Morning Star: Custer and the Little Bighorn.” Jan. 10.

Aaron Swartz, 26. Co-founder of Reddit and activist who fought to make online content free to the public. Jan. 11. Suicide.

Khanh Nguyen, 86. South Vietnamese general who briefly gained control of the government in a coup and went on to lead a “government in exile” in California. Jan. 11.

Eugene Patterson, 89. Pulitzer Prize-winning editor who helped fellow Southern whites understand the civil rights movement, eloquently reminding the silent majority of its complicity in racist violence. Jan. 12.

Conrad Bain, 89. Veteran stage and film actor who became a star in middle age as the kindly white adoptive father of two young African-American brothers in the TV sitcom “Diff’rent Strokes.” Jan. 14.

Nagisa Oshima, 80. Japanese film director acclaimed for “Empire of Passion” and “In the Realm of the Senses.” Jan. 15.

Andre Cassagnes, 86. Inventor of Etch A Sketch, toy that generations of children drew on, shook up and started over. Jan. 16.

Pauline Friedman Phillips, 94. Under the name of Abigail Van Buren, she wrote the long-running “Dear Abby” newspaper advice column read by millions. Jan. 16.

James Hood, 70. One of the first black students who enrolled at the University of Alabama a half century ago in defiance of racial segregation. Jan. 17.

Earl Weaver, 82. Fiery Hall of Fame manager who won 1,480 games with baseball’s Baltimore Orioles. Jan. 19.

Stan Musial, 92. St. Louis Cardinals star with the corkscrew stance and too many batting records to fit on his Hall of Fame plaque. Jan. 19.

Hans Massaquoi, 87. Former managing editor of Ebony magazine whose distinctive memoir described his unusual childhood growing up black in Nazi Germany. Jan. 19.

Donald F. Hornig, 92. Scientist who served as a key figure on the Manhattan Project, an adviser to three U.S. presidents and president of Brown University. Jan. 21.

Linda Pugach, 75. Blinded in 1959 when her lover hired hit men to throw lye in her face, she became a media sensation after later marrying him. Jan. 22.

Cardinal Jozef Glemp, 83. Longtime head of Poland’s influential Roman Catholic church who helped lead the nation peacefully through martial law and the fight against communism. Jan. 23.

Leroy “Sugarfoot” Bonner, 69. Frontman for the hit-making funk music band the Ohio Players. Jan. 26.

Ceija Stojka, 79. She survived three Nazi death camps and went on to raise the awareness of the Nazi persecution of the Roma — or Gypsies — in her art and writings. Jan. 28.

Said Musa Maragha, 86. Hard-line Palestinian military commander better known by his nom de guerre, “Abu Musa,” who rebelled against leader Yasser Arafat to form his own rival party. Jan. 29.

Patty Andrews, 94. Last of the singing Andrews Sisters trio whose hits such as the rollicking “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy of Company B” and the poignant “I Can Dream, Can’t I?” captured the home-front spirit of World War II. Jan. 30.

FEBRUARY:

Ed Koch, 88. Former New York mayor and combative politician who rescued the city from near-financial ruin during three City Hall terms. Feb. 1.

Lavonne “Pepper” Paire-Davis, 88. A star of the All American Girls Professional Baseball League in the 1940s and an inspiration for the central character in the movie “A League of Their Own.” Feb. 2.

Chris Kyle, 38. Former Navy SEAL and author of the best-selling book “American Sniper.” Feb. 2. Fatally shot at a Texas gun range.

Essie Mae Washington-Williams, 87. Mixed-race daughter of one-time segregationist Sen. Strom Thurmond who kept her parentage secret for more than 70 years. Feb. 3.

James Muri, 93. World War II pilot who saved his crippled B-26 bomber and crew by buzzing the flight deck of a Japanese aircraft carrier during the Battle of Midway. Feb. 3.

Donald Byrd, 80. Hard-bop trumpeter of the 1950s who collaborated on dozens of albums with top artists of his time and later enjoyed commercial success with hit jazz-funk fusion records such as “Black Byrd.” Feb. 4.

Petro Vlahos, 96. Two-time Academy Award winner whose blue- and green-screen technique on movies like “Mary Poppins” and “Ben Hur” made the modern blockbuster possible. Feb. 10.

Mindy McCready, 37. She hit the top of the country music charts before personal problems sidetracked her career. Feb. 17. Apparent suicide.

Richard Briers, 79. British actor who was an avuncular comic presence on TV and movie screens for decades. Feb. 17.

Jerry Buss, 80. Los Angeles Lakers’ playboy owner who shepherded the NBA franchise to 10 championships from the ‘80s Showtime dynasty to the Kobe Bryant era. Feb. 18.

Alexei German, 74. Russian film director best known for works offering a bitter view of life in the Soviet Union under dictator Josef Stalin. Feb. 21.

Magic Slim, 75. Younger contemporary of blues greats Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf who helped shape the sound of Chicago’s electric blues. Feb. 21.

Cleotha Staples, 78. Eldest sibling in the influential gospel group The Staple Singers. Feb. 21.

Debi Austin, 62. She smoked a cigarette through a hole in her throat to illustrate her struggle with nicotine addiction in a public service advertisement. Feb. 22. Cancer.

Wojciech Inglot, 57. Polish chemist and businessman who founded and ran a cosmetics company, Inglot, that grew to nearly 400 stores in 50 countries. Feb. 23. Internal hemorrhaging.

C. Everett Koop, 96. He raised the profile of the surgeon general by riveting America’s attention on the then-emerging disease known as AIDS and by railing against smoking. Feb. 25.

Stephane Hessel, 95. Concentration camp survivor and member of the French resistance whose 32-page book “Time for Outrage” became a best-seller and an inspiration for the left. Feb. 26.

Thomas “Tom” Griffin, 96. B-25 bomber navigator in the audacious Doolittle’s Raid attack on mainland Japan during World War II. Feb. 26.

Dale Robertson, 89. Oklahoma native who became a star of television and movie Westerns during the genre’s heyday. Feb. 26.

Van Cliburn, 78. Pianist whose triumph at a 1958 Moscow competition helped thaw the Cold War and launched a spectacular career that made him the rare classical musician to enjoy rock-star status. Feb. 27.

Bruce Reynolds, 81. Mastermind of a British heist known as the “Great Train Robbery.” Feb. 28.

John J. Wilpers Jr., 93. Last surviving member of the U.S. Army intelligence unit that captured former Japanese Prime Minister Hideki Tojo after World War II. Feb. 28.

MARCH:

Bonnie Franklin, 69. Pert, redheaded actress whom millions came to identify with for her role as divorced mom Ann Romano on the sitcom “One Day at a Time.” March 1.

Jewel Akens, 79. Pop singer who had a 1960s hit with “The Birds and the Bees.” March 1. Complications from back surgery.

Fran Warren, 87. Singer-actress whose 1947 recording of “A Sunday Kind of Love” was a hit of the big band era. March 4.

Hugo Chavez, 58. Fiery populist president of Venezuela who declared a socialist revolution, crusaded against U.S. influence and championed a leftist revival across Latin America. March 5. Cancer.

Stompin’ Tom Connors, 77. Country-folk singer whose toe-tapping musical spirit and fierce patriotism established him as one of Canada’s biggest cultural icons. March 6.

Dirk Coetzee, 57. Former commander of an apartheid-era police unit in South Africa that killed black activists. March 6.

Ewald-Heinrich von Kleist, 90. Last surviving member of the main plot to kill Adolf Hitler, who once volunteered to wear a suicide vest to assassinate the Nazi dictator. March 8.

Princess Lilian, 97. Her decades-long love story with the king’s uncle was one of the better kept secrets of the Swedish royal household. March 10.

Ieng Sary, 87. Co-founder of the brutal Khmer Rouge movement in 1970s who became one of its few leaders to be put on trial for the deaths of an estimated 1.7 million Cambodians. March 14.

James Barrett, 86. Vintner whose chardonnay beat the French in a 1976 tasting that propelled California wines to international prominence. March 14.

Olen Burrage, 82. He was acquitted in the case of three civil rights workers killed by Ku Klux Klansmen in Mississippi in the 1960s. March 15.

Frank Thornton, 92. British actor best known as Captain Peacock in the long-running television comedy “Are You Being Served?” March 16.

Mariam Farhat, 64. Palestinian lawmaker known as the “mother of martyrs” who praised and supported three of her sons who were killed while carrying out deadly attacks against Israelis. March 17.

A.B.C. “Cal” Whipple, 94. Connecticut man who helped get a groundbreaking photograph of dead American soldiers published during World War II. March 17.

Harry Reems, 65. Male star of the 1972’s “Deep Throat,” which brought pornographic film to mainstream audiences. March 19.

Zillur Rahman, 84. Bangladesh’s figurehead president, he was a top leader of the ruling Awami League party before Parliament elected him president in 2009. March 20.

James Herbert, 69. British horror writer whose best-sellers included “The Rats” and “The Fog.” March 20.

George Lowe, 89. Last surviving climber from the team that made the first successful ascent of Mount Everest. March 20.

Chinua Achebe, 82. Nigerian author, statesman and dissident who gave literary birth to modern Africa with “Things Fall Apart” and continued for decades to rewrite and reclaim the history of his native country. March 21.

Bebo Valdes, 94. Renowned pianist, composer and bandleader who recorded with Nat “King” Cole, was musical director at Havana’s legendary Tropicana Club and a key participant in the golden age of Cuban music. March 22.

Joe Weider, 93. Legendary figure in bodybuilding who helped popularize the sport and played a key role in introducing young weightlifter Arnold Schwarzenegger to the world. March 23.

Deke Richards, 68. As leader of the Motown creative team known as The Corporation, he was involved in writing and producing many Jackson 5 hits. March 24.

John Williamson, 80. Pioneer of the 1960s sexual revolution as co-founder of Topanga Canyon’s Sandstone Retreat, where nudity and free love once took place with abandon. March 24. Cancer.

Elwin Wilson, 76. Former Ku Klux Klan supporter who apologized for years of violent racism, including the beating of Freedom Rider John Lewis who went on to become a Georgia congressman. March 28.

Richard Griffiths, 65. Versatile British actor who won a Tony Award for “The History Boys” and played unsympathetic Uncle Vernon Dursley in the “Harry Potter” movies. March 28.

Phil Ramone, 79. Grammy-winning engineer, arranger and producer whose platinum touch included recordings with Ray Charles, Billy Joel and Paul Simon. March 30. Complications from heart surgery.

APRIL:

Barbara Piasecka Johnson, 76. A Polish farmer’s daughter who worked as a maid for an American heir to the Johnson & Johnson fortune before marrying him and eventually inheriting much of his wealth. April 1.

Jane Henson, 78. She was married to Jim Henson and the two were creative and business partners in the development of the Muppets. April 2.

Roger Ebert, 70. First journalist to win a Pulitzer Prize for movie criticism, who, on his long-running TV review program, wielded the nation’s most influential thumb. April 4.

Victor Carranza, 77. Colombia’s “emerald czar,” he survived at least two assassination attempts and avoided criminal conviction despite being prosecuted for allegedly forming far-right militias. April 4.

Anna Merz, 83. Conservationist who sought to protect the rhinoceros from poaching that has severely depleted its numbers in Africa. April 4.

Lilly Pulitzer, 81. Palm Beach socialite-turned-designer whose tropical print dresses in the 1960s later became a fashion classic. April 7.

Margaret Thatcher, 87. Conservative British prime minister who infuriated European allies, found a fellow believer in Ronald Reagan and transformed her country by a ruthless dedication to free markets. April 8. Stroke.

Annette Funicello, 70. Child star as a perky Mouseketeer on “The Mickey Mouse Club” in the 1950s, who then teamed with Frankie Avalon on a string of ‘60s fun-in-the-sun movies with names like “Beach Party Bingo.” April 8. Complications from multiple sclerosis.

Robert Edwards, 87. Nobel prizewinner from Britain whose pioneering in vitro fertilization research led to the first test tube baby. April 10.

Maria Tallchief, 88. One of America’s first great prima ballerinas who gave life to “The Nutcracker,” ‘’Firebird,” and other masterpieces from choreographer George Balanchine. April 11.

Jonathan Winters, 87. Cherub-faced comedian whose breakneck improvisations and misfit characters inspired the likes of Robin Williams and Jim Carrey. April 11.

Hilary Koprowski, 96. Pioneering virologist who developed the first successful oral vaccination for polio. April 11.

Bob Perry, 80. Houston real estate magnate and political mega-donor who shunned the limelight while generously bankrolling GOP candidates. April 13.

Pat Summerall, 82. Deep-voiced NFL player-turned-broadcaster who spent half of his four decades calling sports famously paired with John Madden. April 16.

Alan Wood, 90. World War II veteran credited with providing the flag in the famous flag-raising on Iwo Jima. April 18.

Al Neuharth, 89. Founder of USA Today, the nation’s most widely read newspaper. April 19.

Robert Earl Holding, 86. Billionaire whose business empire included ownership of Sinclair Oil and two world-class ski resorts. April 19.

Allan Arbus, 95. He played the wise _ and wisecracking _ psychiatrist Dr. Sidney Freedman on TV’s “M.A.S.H.” April 19.

Deanna Durbin, 91. Teen sensation whose sparkling soprano voice and girl-next-door looks made her a star during Hollywood’s Golden Age. Around April 20.

Chrissy Amphlett, 53. Raunchy lead singer of the Australian band Divinyls whose hit “I Touch Myself” brought her fame in the early 1990s. April 21. Breast cancer and multiple sclerosis.

Leopold Engleitner, 107. Oldest known survivor of Nazi concentration camps. April 21.

George Jones, 81. Peerless, hard-living country singer who recorded dozens of hits about good times and regrets and peaked with the heartbreaker “He Stopped Loving Her Today.” April 26.

Bishop Aloysius Jin Luxian, 96. Shanghai bishop who revived the Catholic church in China’s financial hub after years of Maoist persecution. April 27.

MAY:

Chris Kelly, 34. Half of the 1990s kid rap duo Kris Kross who made one of the decade’s most memorable songs with “Jump.” May 1. Drug overdose.

Jeff Hanneman, 49. Founding member of the pioneering metal band Slayer whose career was irrevocably changed after a spider bite. May 2. Liver failure.

David Morris Kern, 103. Creator of Orajel, a medicine aimed at toothaches that was later also used for mouth sores. May 3.

Otis R. Bowen, 95. Small-town doctor who overhauled Indiana’s tax system as governor before helping promote safe sex practices in the early years of AIDS as the top health official under President Ronald Reagan. May 4.

Giulio Andreotti, 94. Seven-time premier and a symbol of postwar Italy. May 6.

Ray Harryhausen, 92. Special-effects master whose sword-fighting skeletons, six-tentacled octopus and other fantastical creations won raves from film lovers and industry heavyweights. May 7.

Jeanne Cooper, 84. Soap opera star who played grande dame Katherine Chancellor for nearly four decades on “The Young and the Restless.” May 8.

Ottavio Missoni, 92. Patriarch of an iconic fashion brand of zigzag-patterned knitwear. May 9.

Malcolm Shabazz, 28. Grandson of Malcolm X who at age 12, set a fire that killed the political activist’s widow. May 9. Injuries from being beaten.

Boruch Spiegel, 93. One of the last survivors of the 1943 Warsaw ghetto uprising by poorly armed Jewish insurgents against the powerful Nazi German force that occupied Poland. May 9.

Joyce Brothers, 85. Pop psychologist who pioneered the television advice show in the 1950s and enjoyed a long career as a syndicated columnist, author, and TV and film personality. May 13.

Billie Sol Estes, 88. Flamboyant Texas huckster who became notorious in 1962 when accused of looting a federal crop subsidy program. May 14.

Valtr Komarek, 82. Left-wing Czech politician who helped overthrow the country’s communist regime and was one of the most visible faces of the so-called “Velvet Revolution.” May 16.

Jorge Rafael Videla, 87. Former Argentine dictator who took power in a 1976 coup and led a military junta that killed thousands in a dirty war to eliminate so-called “subversives,” May 17.

Ken Venturi, 82. Golf star who overcame dehydration to win the 1964 U.S. Open and spent 35 years in the booth for CBS Sports. May 17.

Ray Manzarek, 74. Founding member of the 1960s rock group The Doors whose versatile and often haunting keyboards complemented Jim Morrison’s gloomy baritone. May 20. Cancer.

Jack Vance, 96. Award-winning mystery, fantasy and science fiction author who wrote more than 60 books. May 26.

Rev. Andrew Greeley, 85. Outspoken Roman Catholic priest, best-selling author and Chicago newspaper columnist who criticized church hierarchy over the child sex abuse scandal. May 29.

Rituparno Ghosh, 49. Indian film director whose work includes award-winning films in the Bengali language. May 30. Cardiac arrest.

Jean Stapleton, 90. Stage-trained character actress who played Archie Bunker’s far better half, the sweetly naive Edith, in TV’s groundbreaking 1970s comedy “All in the Family.” May 31.

JUNE:

Chen Xitong, 82. As Beijing’s mayor, he backed the military crackdown on the Tiananmen Square democratic movement but later expressed regret for the loss of life. June 2.

Mandawuy Yunupingu, 56. The former lead singer of Australian indigenous band Yothu Yindi and one of the country’s most famous Aborigines. June 2.

Frank Lautenberg, 89. Multimillionaire New Jersey businessman and the last World War II veteran remaining in the U.S. Senate. June 3.

David “Deacon” Jones, 74. Hall of Fame defensive end credited with coining the word sack for how he knocked down quarterbacks. June 3.

Rev. Will Campbell, 88. White minister who drew acclaim for his involvement in the civil rights movement. June 3.

Esther Williams, 91. Swimming champion-turned-actress who starred in glittering, aquatic Technicolor musicals of the 1940s and 1950s. June 6.

Pierre Mauroy, 84. As France’s prime minister in the early 1980s, he implemented radical social reforms that made life easier for French workers. June 7.

Richard Ramirez, 53. Serial killer known as the Night Stalker who left satanic signs at murder scenes during a reign of terror in the 1980s. June 7. Liver failure.

Iain Banks, 59. Scottish writer who alternately wowed and disturbed readers with his dark jokes and narrative tricks. June 9.

Robert W. Fogel, 86. University of Chicago economist whose study of the economics of slavery sparked a furious debate in academia and later helped garner him a Nobel prize. June 11.

Thomas Penfield Jackson, 76. As federal judge in Washington he presided over a historic Microsoft antitrust case and the drug possession trial of former Mayor Marion Barry. June 15.

Kenneth Wilson, 77. He earned a Nobel prize for pioneering work that changed the way physicists think about phase transitions. June 15. Complications of lymphoma.

Michael Hastings, 33. Award-winning journalist and war correspondent whose unflinching reporting ended the career of a top American army general. June 18. Car accident.

James Gandolfini, 51. Actor whose portrayal of a brutal but emotionally delicate crime boss in HBO’s “The Sopranos” turned the mobster stereotype on its head. June 19. Heart attack.

Slim Whitman, 90. Country singer who sold millions of records through TV ads in the 1980s and 1990s and whose song saved the world in the film comedy “Mars Attacks!” June 19.

Gyula Horn, 80. Former Hungarian prime minister who played a key role in opening the Iron Curtain. June 19.

Vince Flynn, 47. Best-selling author who wrote the Mitch Rapp counterterrorism thriller series. June 19. Cancer.

Bobby “Blue” Bland, 83. Singer who blended Southern blues and soul in songs such as “Turn on Your Love Light” and “Further On Up the Road.” June 23.

Richard Matheson, 87. Prolific sci-fi and fantasy writer whose “I Am Legend” and “The Shrinking Man” were transformed into films. June 23.

Marc Rich, 78. Trader known as the “King of Commodities” whose 2001 pardon by President Bill Clinton just hours before he left office prompted fierce criticism. June 26.

Jim Kelly, 67. Actor who played a glib American martial artist in “Enter the Dragon” with Bruce Lee. June 29. Cancer.

JULY:

William H. Gray III, 71. He rose to influential positions in Congress and was the first black majority whip. July 1.

Charles “Chuck” Foley, 82. His Twister game launched decades of awkward social interactions at parties. July 1.

Princess Fawzia, 92. Member of Egypt’s last royal family and the first wife of Iran’s later-deposed monarch. July 2.

Doug Engelbart, 88. Visionary who invented the computer mouse and developed other technology that has transformed the way people work, play and communicate. July 2.

Lo Hsing Han, 80. So-called “Godfather of Heroin,” he faced financial sanctions for allegedly helping prop up Myanmar’s brutal former military junta through illegal business dealings. July 6.

Pran, 93. India’s legendary actor who played some of Bollywood’s most memorable villains in a career that spanned six decades. July 12. Pneumonia.

Amar Bose, 83. Acoustic pioneer and founder and chairman of an audio technology company known for the rich sound of its tabletop radios and its noise-canceling headphones. July 12.

Cory Monteith, 31. Actor on the television show “Glee” who had struggled for years with substance abuse. July 13. Overdose of heroin and alcohol.

Willie Louis, 76. Witness who went into hiding after testifying at the Emmett Till trial about hearing the lynching victim’s screams. July 18.

Helen Thomas, 92. Irrepressible White House correspondent who used her seat in the front row of history to grill nine presidents. July 20.

Dennis Farina, 69. Onetime Chicago cop who as a popular character actor played a TV cop on “Law & Order” during his wide-ranging career. July 22.

Emile Griffith, 75. Elegant world boxing champion whose career was overshadowed by the fatal beating he gave Bennie Paret in a 1962 title bout that darkened all of boxing. July 23.

Virginia Johnson, 88. Half of the husband-wife research team that transformed the study of sex in the 1960s and wrote two best-selling books on sexuality. July 24.

George P. Mitchell, 94. Billionaire Texas oilman, developer and philanthropist who was considered the father of fracking. July 26.

Lindy Boggs, 97. Former congresswoman and plantation-born Louisianan who fought for civil rights during nearly 18 years in Congress after succeeding her late husband in the House. July 27.

George “Bud” Day, 88. Medal of Honor recipient who spent 51/2 years as a POW in Vietnam and was Arizona Sen. John McCain’s cellmate. July 27.

David “Kidd” Kraddick, 53. High-octane radio and TV host of the “Kidd Kraddick in the Morning” show. July 27.

William Warren Scranton, 96. Former Pennsylvania governor, presidential candidate and ambassador to the United Nations. July 28.

Harry F. Byrd, 98. Champion of racial segregation and fiscal restraint who followed his father into the U.S. Senate. July 30.

Berthold Beitz, 99. Honored for saving hundreds of Jews in occupied Poland during World War II, he became one of postwar West Germany’s leading industrialists. July 30.

AUGUST:

George Duke, 67. Grammy-winning keyboardist and producer whose sound infused acoustic jazz, electronic jazz, funk, R&B and soul in a 40-year-plus career. Aug. 5.

Stan Lynde, 81. Western cartoonist and author who created the nationally syndicated “Rick O’Shay” comic strip. Aug. 6.

“Cowboy” Jack Clement, 82. Producer, engineer and songwriter who helped birth rock ‘n’ roll and push country music into modern times. Aug. 8.

Laszlo Csatary, 98. Ex-police officer indicted in June by Hungarian authorities for allegedly abusing Jews and contributing to their deportation to Nazi death camps during World War II. Aug. 10.

Johan Friso, 44. Dutch prince who gave up his position in line to the throne after getting entangled in a scandal with his bride-to-be. Aug. 12. Complications from a skiing accident.

Jack W. Germond, 85. Portly, cantankerous columnist and pundit who covered 10 presidential elections and sparred with colleagues on TV’s “The McLaughlin Group.” Aug. 14.

Marich Man Singh Shrestha, 71. Last Nepalese prime minister to serve before protests ushered in the country’s first democratic elections in the early 1990s. Aug. 15. Lung cancer.

Bert Lance, 82. Georgia banker who served as President Jimmy Carter’s first budget director before departing amid an investigation of his banking activities. Aug. 15.

Jacques Verges, 88. Flamboyant lawyer nicknamed the “Devil’s advocate” for his defense of former Nazis, terrorist bombers and notorious dictators. Aug. 15.

Rosalia Mera, 69. Seamstress who co-founded a clothing store in Spain that grew into one of the world’s largest retail chains, she was Spain’s richest woman. Aug. 15.

Florin Cioaba, 58. King of the Gypsies, he was a member of the family that has led Romania’s embattled Roma minority since the 19th century. Aug. 18. Heart attack.

Albert Murray, 97. Influential novelist and critic who celebrated black culture, scorned black separatism and was once praised by Duke Ellington as the “unsquarest man I know.” Aug. 18.

Lee Thompson Young, 29. Actor who as a teen starred in “The Famous Jett Jackson” and was featured in the film “Friday Night Lights” and the TV series “Rizzoli & Isles.” Aug. 19. Apparent suicide.

Elmore Leonard, 87. Acclaimed crime novelist whose best-sellers and the movies made from them chronicled the violent deaths of many a thug. Aug. 20. Complications from a stroke.

C. Gordon Fullerton, 76. Former astronaut who flew on two space shuttle missions and had an extensive career as a research and test pilot for NASA and the Air Force. Aug. 21.

Julie Harris, 87. Much-honored Broadway performer whose roles ranged from the flamboyant Sally Bowles in “I Am a Camera” to the reclusive Emily Dickinson in “The Belle of Amherst.” Aug. 24.

Muriel “Mickie” Siebert, 84. She started as a trainee on Wall Street and became the first woman to own a seat on the New York Stock Exchange. Aug. 24.

Robert R. Taylor, 77. He put soap in pump bottles and forever changed the way people wash up. Aug. 29. Cancer.

Seamus Heaney, 74. Ireland’s foremost poet who won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1995. Aug. 30.

David Frost, 74. Veteran broadcaster who won fame around the world for his interview with former President Richard Nixon. Aug. 31.

SEPTEMBER:

Judith Glassman Daniels, 74. She blazed a trail for women in the publishing world and became the first woman to serve as top editor of Life magazine. Sept. 1. Stomach cancer.

Ronald Coase, 102. Nobel Prize winner and a pioneer in applying economic theory to the law. Sept. 2.

Frederik Pohl, 93. Over decades he gained a reputation of being a literate and sophisticated writer of science fiction. Sept. 2.

Rochus Misch, 96. Adolf Hitler’s devoted bodyguard for most of World War II and the last remaining witness to the Nazi leader’s final hours in his Berlin bunker. Sept. 5.

Demetrius Newton, 85. Attorney who represented Rosa Parks and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and became the first black person to serve as speaker pro tem of the Alabama House. Sept. 11.

Ray Dolby, 80. American inventor and audio pioneer who founded Dolby Laboratories. Sept. 12.

Chin Peng, 88. Tough former communist guerrilla who led a bloody but failed insurgency against British rule in Malaysia in the late 1940s and early 1950s. Sept. 16. Cancer.

Eiji Toyoda, 100. Member of Toyota’s founding family who helped create the super-efficient “Toyota Way” production method. Sept. 17.

Ken Norton, 70. Former heavyweight champion who beat Muhammad Ali and then lost a controversial decision to him in Yankee Stadium. Sept. 18.

Marcel Reich-Ranicki, 93. He grew up in Poland and Nazi Germany, survived the Warsaw Ghetto and went on to become postwar Germany’s best-known literary critic. Sept. 18.

Hiroshi Yamauchi, 85. He ran Nintendo for more than 50 years and led the Japanese company’s transition from traditional playing-card maker to video game giant. Sept. 19. Pneumonia.

Michael Moses Ward, 41. One of two survivors of the 1985 bombing of the militant group MOVE in a Philadelphia neighborhood. Sept. 20. Apparent drowning aboard a cruise ship.

Alvaro Mutis Jaramillo, 90. Prolific Colombian writer and poet. Sept. 22.

Oscar Espinosa Chepe, 72. Cuban economist and diplomat who broke with Fidel Castro’s government in the 1990s and was imprisoned for dissident activities. Sept. 23.

Ruth Patrick, 105. Scientist whose research on freshwater ecosystems led to groundbreaking ways to measure pollution in rivers and streams. Sept. 23.

Evelyn Lowery, 88. Pioneer in civil rights and women’s empowerment and the wife of the Rev. Joseph Lowery. Sept. 26.

Harold Agnew, 92. Former Los Alamos National Laboratory director who led the effort to train the first group of international atomic inspectors. Sept. 29.

OCTOBER:

Tom Clancy, 66. His high-tech, Cold War thrillers such as “The Hunt for Red October” and “Patriot Games” made him the most widely read and influential military novelist of his time. Oct. 1.

Abraham Nemeth, 94. Blind designer of the internationally recognized Nemeth Braille Math Code that simplified symbols for easier use in advanced math and science. Oct. 2.

Vo Nguyen Giap, 102. Brilliant, ruthless commander who led outgunned Vietnamese to victory first over the French and then the Americans. Oct. 4.

Rabbi Ovadia Yosef, 93. Spiritual leader of Israel’s Sephardic Jews who transformed immigrants from North Africa and Arab nations and their descendants into a political force. Oct. 7.

Mark “Chopper” Read, 58. One of Australia’s most notorious and colorful crime figures. Oct. 9. Cancer.

Stanley Kauffmann, 97. Film critic for The New Republic for 50 years, author of plays and fiction, and editor who helped discover the novels “Fahrenheit 451” and “The Moviegoer.” Oct. 9.

Scott Carpenter, 88. Second American to orbit the Earth and first person to explore both the heights of space and depths of the ocean. Oct. 10. Complications from a stroke.

Erich Priebke, 100. Former Nazi SS captain who evaded arrest for nearly 50 years after taking part in one of the worst atrocities by German occupiers in Italy during World War II. Oct. 11.

Wadih Safi, 92. Lebanese singer and composer whose strong, clear voice propelled him to fame throughout the Arab world. Oct. 11.

William H. Sullivan, 90. Diplomat who oversaw the “secret war” in Laos, helped negotiate an end to U.S. military involvement in Vietnam and was the last American ambassador to Iran. Oct. 11.

Takashi Yanase, 94. Creator of one of Japan’s most beloved cartoon characters, Anpanman. Oct. 13.

Hans Riegel, 90. Longtime boss of German candy maker Haribo who took the gummi bear to international fame. Oct. 15.

Ed Lauter, 74. Character actor whose long, angular face and stern bearing made him instantly recognizable in scores of movies and TV shows over five decades. Oct. 16. Mesothelioma.

Sein Win, 91. Renowned journalist in Myanmar who championed press freedom and endured three stints in prison as he chronicled several decades of his country’s turbulent history. Oct. 17.

Antonia Brenner, 86. American nun who was raised in Beverly Hills and abandoned a life of privilege to live in a notorious Mexican prison. Oct. 17.

Lou Scheimer, 84. He founded the Filmation animation studio that produced Saturday morning cartoons including “Fat Albert” and “The Archie Show.” Oct. 17.

Bum Phillips, 90. Folksy Texas football icon who coached the Houston Oilers during their Luv Ya Blue heyday and later led the New Orleans Saints. Oct. 18.

Tom Foley, 84. Courtly former speaker of the U.S. House who lost his seat when Republicans seized control of Congress in 1994. Oct. 18. Complications from a stroke.

Bill Young, 82. Senior Republican in the U.S. House and a defense hawk who was influential on military spending during his 43 years in Washington. Oct. 18.

William C. Lowe, 72. Former IBM executive credited with helping to bring personal computers to the masses. Oct. 19. Heart attack.

Major Owens, 77. New York City Democrat who served 12 terms in the U.S. House and helped pass the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Oct. 21. Renal failure and heart failure.

Somdet Phra Nyanasamvara, 100. Thailand’s Supreme Patriarch, who headed the country’s order of Buddhist monks for more than two decades. Oct. 24.

Lou Reed, 71. Punk poet of rock ‘n’ roll who profoundly influenced generations of musicians as leader of the Velvet Underground and remained a vital solo performer for decades after. Oct. 27.

Tadeusz Mazowiecki, 86. Eastern Europe’s first democratic prime minister after communism, key adviser to Poland’s Solidarity movement and U.N. human rights envoy to Bosnia. Oct. 28.

Ike Skelton, 81. He built a reputation as a military expert and social conservative during 34 years representing Missourians in the U.S. House. Oct. 28.

NOVEMBER:

Editta Sherman, 101. Photographer known as the “Duchess of Carnegie Hall” while living in a studio over the auditorium for six decades. Nov. 1.

George Magovern, 89. Pittsburgh cardiovascular surgeon who pioneered artificial heart valves. Nov. 4.

Charlie Trotter, 54. Award-winning chef and self-taught culinary master whose namesake Chicago restaurant elevated the city’s cuisine and provided a training ground for top chefs. Nov. 5.

John Tavener, 69. British composer often remembered for the elegiac song performed as Princess Diana’s coffin was carried out of Westminster Abbey. Nov. 12.

Glafcos Clerides, 94. Former president who guided Cyprus into the European Union and dedicated most of his 50 years in politics to trying to reunify the ethnically split island. Nov. 15.

Barbara Park, 66. Former class clown who channeled her irreverence into the million-selling mishaps of grade-schooler Junie B. Jones. Nov. 15.

Doris Lessing, 94. Nobel Prize-winning, often-polarizing author of “The Golden Notebook” and other novels that reflected her own improbable journey across the former British empire. Nov. 17.

Merrell Williams Jr., 72. Onetime paralegal who took on Big Tobacco as a whistleblower who leaked internal documents exposing health risks and the addictiveness of cigarettes. Nov. 18.

Diane Disney Miller, 79. Walt Disney’s daughter and one of his inspirations for building the Disneyland theme park. Nov. 19.

Frederick Sanger, 95. British biochemist who twice won the Nobel Prize in chemistry and has been called the father of the genomic era. Nov. 19.

Joseph Paul Franklin, 63. White supremacist who targeted blacks and Jews in a cross-country killing spree from 1977 to 1980. Nov. 20. Executed.

Sylvia Browne, 77. Psychic who made frequent appearances on programs such as “Larry King Live” and “The Montel Williams Show.” Nov. 20.

Michael Weiner, 51. Labor lawyer who took over as head of the baseball players’ union four years ago and smoothed its contentious relationship with management. Nov. 21. Brain tumor.

Fred F. Scherer, 98. Painter who created vivid dioramas of animals and birds in natural scenes for the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. Nov. 25.

Jane Kean, 90. Performer who got her start in musical theater but was best known as Trixie alongside Jackie Gleason on a TV revival of “The Honeymooners.” Nov. 26.

Paul Walker, 40. Star of the “Fast & Furious” movie series. Nov. 30. Car crash.

Paul Crouch, 79. Televangelist who built what’s been called the world’s largest Christian broadcasting network. Nov. 30.

DECEMBER:

Edward J. “Babe” Heffron, 90. His World War II army service was recounted in the book and TV miniseries “Band of Brothers.” Dec. 1.

Heinrich Boere, 92. He murdered Dutch civilians as part of a Nazi Waffen SS hit squad during World War II but avoided justice for six decades. Dec. 1.

Andre Schiffrin, 78. Editor who gave readers Art Spiegelman, Michel Foucault and Studs Terkel before he was forced out of commercial publishing in a battle between profits and literature. Dec. 1. Pancreatic cancer.

Ahmed Fouad Negm, 84. Egypt’s “poet of the people” whose political verses in colloquial Arabic skewered the country’s leaders and inspired protesters from the 1970s to today. Dec. 3.

Nelson Mandela, 95. Colossus of the 20th century who emerged from 27 years in prison to negotiate an end to white minority rule in South Africa and became that nation’s first black president. Dec. 5.

Betty Quadracci, 75. Quad/Graphics Inc. co-founder who also was president of Milwaukee Magazine and a champion of the arts. Dec. 9.

Eleanor Parker, 91. She was nominated for Academy Awards three times for her portrayals of strong-willed women and played a scheming baroness in “The Sound of Music.” Dec. 9. Complications from pneumonia.

Jang Song Thaek, 67. Uncle of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, who was long considered the country’s No. 2 power. Dec. 12. Executed.

Wilfred Billey, 90. A Navajo Code Talker, whose words are inscribed on congressional medals given to his group and who fought to have a World War II comrade recognized for his service. Dec. 12.

Peter O’Toole, 81. Charismatic actor who achieved instant stardom as the title character of “Lawrence of Arabia” and was nominated eight times for an Academy Award. Dec. 14.

Joan Fontaine, 96. Academy Award-winning actress who found stardom playing naive wives in Alfred Hitchcock’s “Suspicion” and “Rebecca” and also was featured in films by Billy Wilder, Fritz Lang and Nicholas Ray. Dec. 15.

Harold Camping, 92. California preacher who used his evangelical radio ministry and billboards to predict the end of the world and then gave up public prophecy when his date-specific doomsdays did not come to pass. Dec. 15.

Ray Price, 87. One of country music’s most popular and influential singers and bandleaders who had more than 100 hits. Dec. 16.

Graham Mackay, 64. SABMiller PLC chairman who helped guide the company from a South African industrial conglomerate into one of the world’s biggest brewers. Dec. 18. Brain tumor.

Al Goldstein, 77. The publisher of Screw magazine who helped break down legal barriers against pornography and raged against politicians and organized religion. Dec. 19.

Jesus Gutierrez Rebollo, 79. A Mexican drug czar disgraced by his arrest and conviction for aiding a powerful drug cartel. Dec. 19.

John S.D. Eisenhower, 91. The son of a five-star general turned president who forged his own career in the U.S. Army and then chronicled the history of the American military in numerous books. Dec. 21.

Edgar M. Bronfman Sr., 84. The billionaire businessman and longtime president of the World Jewish Congress, which lobbied the Soviets to allow Jews to emigrate and helped spearhead the search for hidden Nazi loot. Dec. 21.

Mikhail Kalashnikov, 94. His work as a weapons designer for the Soviet Union is immortalized in the name of the world’s most popular firearm, the AK-47 assault rifle, which is often called “a Kalashnikov.” Dec. 23.