Tag Archives: list

Milwaukee’s domes on endangered places list

Milwaukee’s Mitchell Park Domes are on the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s list of “America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places.”

Each year, the trust unveils a list spotlighting important examples of the nation’s architectural and cultural heritage that are at risk of destruction or irreparable damage.

More than 270 sites have been on the list over its 29-year history, but the designation appears to help protect the sites. In 29 years, fewer than 5 percent of listed sites have been lost.

The trust said its latest list includes historic places in urban areas “at a time when cities across the nation are experiencing a resurgence.”

Millions of Americans are choosing to relocate to urban areas, with many opting to live in distinctive, character-rich older and historic neighborhoods. Preservation in these neighborhoods is playing a key role in this trend of “reurbanism.”

So, with its 2016 list, the trust is highlighting the importance of adaptability and preservation of historic buildings.

A look at the 11 sites and what the trust has to say about them:

  • Milwaukee’s Mitchell Park Domes at Mitchell Park Horticultural Conservator on Layton Boulevard, a beloved Milwaukee institution for generations, a unique engineering marvel and a highly significant example of midcentury modern architecture, the domes are facing calls for their demolition.
  • Segundo Barrio and Chihuahuita Neighborhoods of El Paso, Texas, centers of Latino community life for more than a century, these neighborhoods are experiencing increased demolition.
  • San Francisco’s Embarcadero District, one of the nation’s most beloved historic areas, the Embarcadero must adapt to the threats of seismic vulnerability and sea-level rise.
  • The Sunshine Mile in Tucson, Arizona, an architecturally rich commercial corridor populated by smaller-scale mid-century buildings, many of which could be lost if a new transportation plan moves ahead.
  • Lions Municipal Golf Course, Austin, Texas. Widely regarded as the first municipal golf course in the South to desegregate, “Muny” is a civil rights landmark facing development pressure.
  • Azikiwe-Nkrumah Hall at Lincoln University, Lincoln, Pennsylvania. The oldest building on the campus of the first degree-granting institution in the nation for African Americans, the hall currently stands empty and faces an uncertain future.
  • Bears Ears in Southeastern Utah. The 1.9 million-acre Bears Ears cultural landscape features an excellent collection of archaeological sites, cliff dwellings, petroglyphs and ancient roads that illuminate 12,000 years of human history. The area is threatened by looting, mismanaged recreational use and energy development.
  • Charleston Naval Hospital District, North Charleston, South Carolina. The historic district played a prominent role during World War II as a primary re-entry point for American servicemen injured in Europe and Africa. Now threatened by a proposed rail line, the district is at risk of being largely destroyed.
  • Delta Queen, Houma, Louisiana. This steamboat was built in 1926 and today is among the last of its kind. Federal legislation that would enable the ship to return to overnight passenger cruising remains a key piece to securing the Delta Queen’s sustainability and future.
  • Historic Downtown Flemington, New Jersey. Historic buildings at the core of the town that hosted the “Trial of the Century.” the Charles Lindbergh baby kidnapping trial, are threatened by a development proposal that would demolish the Union Hotel, along with three other adjacent historic buildings.
  • James River, James City County, Virginia. Jamestown, America’s first permanent English settlement, was founded along the banks of the James River in 1607. The river and landscape, also named to this list by the Trust in 2013, remain threatened by a proposed transmission line project that would compromise the scenic integrity of this historic area.

“For nearly 30 years, our list of America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places has called attention to threatened one-of-a-kind treasures throughout the nation and galvanized local communities to help save them,” said Stephanie Meeks, president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. “This year’s list elevates important threatened historic places in our nation’s cities at a time when more than 80 percent of Americans live in urban areas.”

She continued, “We know that preservation is an essential part of the current urban renaissance and that old buildings contribute to the sustainability and walkability of our communities. Historic buildings are also powerful economic engines that spur revitalization, meet a broad range of human needs and enhance the quality of life for us all. With thoughtful and creative policy approaches and tools, we can tap the full potential of these important places and secure a foundation for a stronger and more vibrant future.”

Update on Oct. 12 …

The Mitchell Park Domes Task Force was to meet for the first time on Oct. 12 to discuss the future of the structures.

The Milwaukee County Board of Supervisors established the 11-member task force to develop a comprehensive long-term plan for the domes.

The task force is chaired by William H. Lynch, a local attorney, and includes County Board Supervisors Peggy A. West, in whose district the Domes are located, and Jason Haas, chair of the County Board’s Parks Committee.

The task force also includes John Dargle, director of the Milwaukee County Parks Department, and several representatives from community organizations.

The domes were closed earlier this year due to concerns about the potential of crumbling concrete to create a safety hazard for visitors, according to a news release that announced the task force meeting.

 

Bible among most challenged books on latest list

On the latest list of books most objected to at public schools and libraries, one title has been targeted nationwide, at times for the sex and violence it contains, but mostly for the legal issues it raises. The Bible.

“You have people who feel that if a school library buys a copy of the Bible, it’s a violation of church and state,” says James LaRue, who directs the Office for Intellectual Freedom for the American Library Association, which released its annual 10 top snapshot of “challenged” books this week, part of the association’s “State of Libraries Report” for 2016.

“And sometimes there’s a retaliatory action, where a religious group has objected to a book and a parent might respond by objecting to the Bible.”

LaRue emphasized that the library association does not oppose having Bibles in public schools.

Guidelines for the Office for Intellectual Freedom note that the Bible “does not violate the separation of church and state as long as the library does not endorse or promote the views included in the Bible.”

The ALA also favors including a wide range of religious materials, from the Quran to the Bhagavad Gita to the Book of Mormon.

LaRue added that the association does hear of complaints about the Quran, but fewer than for the Bible.

The Bible finished sixth on a list topped by John Green’s “Looking for Alaska,” which has been cited for “offensive language” and sexual content. The runner-up, challenged for obvious reasons, was E L James’ raunchy romance “Fifty Shades of Grey.”

“I Am Jazz,” a transgender picture book by Jessica Herthel and Jazz Jennings, was No. 3, followed by another transgender story, Susan Kuklin’s “Beyond Magenta.”

The list also includes Mark Haddon’s “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time,” Alison Bechdel’s “Fun Home,” Craig Thompson’s “Habibi,” Jeanette Winter’s “Nasreen’s Secret School: A True Story from Afghanistan” and David Leviathan’s “Two Boys Kissing,” with one objection being that it “condones public displays of affection.”

“Many of the books deal with issues of diversity,” LaRue said. “And that often leads to challenges.”

The association bases its list on news reports and on accounts submitted from libraries and defines a challenge as a “formal, written complaint filed with a library or school requesting that materials be removed because of content or appropriateness.”

Just 275 incidents were compiled by the ALA, down from 311 the year before and one of the lowest on record.

The ALA has long believed that for every challenge brought to its attention, four or five others are not reported. LaRue says the association does not have a number for books actually pulled in 2015.

Challenged works in recent years have ranged from the Harry Potter novels to Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird.”

Discussing recent events, LaRue said he was concerned by legislation that Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe recently vetoed forcing schools to warn parents if their children will be assigned books with sexually explicit content. A Fairfax County mother had protested the use of Toni Morrison’s Pulitzer Prize-winning “Beloved” in her son’s high school senior class. The 1987 novel set in the post-Civil War era includes scenes depicting sex, rape and bestiality and has appeared occasionally on the ALA challenged books list.

“We see the danger of censorship moving from the school library into the English classroom,” LaRue said.

On the Web

www.ala.org

UW-Oshkosh is No. 3 on Sierra’s list of greenest schools

Sierra magazine, the official publication of the Sierra Club, released its ninth annual “Cool Schools” ranking of America’s greenest colleges and universities and put University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh in the top 3.

Each of the schools ranked in the top 20 have displayed a deep and thorough commitment to protecting the environment, addressing climate issues and encouraging environmental responsibility, according to a news release from the club.

More than 150 schools filled out Sierra’s survey about sustainability practices on campus. Using a customized scoring system, Sierra’s researchers ranked the universities based on their commitment to upholding high environmental standards.

Sierra magazine’s top 20 schools of 2015 are:

  1. University of California, Irvine

  2. University of California, Davis

  3. University of Wisconsin—Oshkosh

  4. Colorado State University (Fort Collins, CO)

  5. Oberlin College (Oberlin, OH)

  6. University of Connecticut   

  7. University of California, San Diego

  8. University of Washington, Seattle

  9. Lewis & Clark College (Portland, OR)

  10. University of California, Berkeley

  11. University of South Florida (Tampa, FL)

  12. Green Mountain College, (Poultney, VT)

  13. Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ)

  14. Middlebury College (Middlebury, VT)

  15. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

  16. Dickinson College (Carlisle, PA)

  17. College of the Atlantic (Bar Harbor, ME)

  18. University of California, Santa Barbara

  19. Colby College (Waterville, ME)

  20. Portland State University (Portland, OR)

“We’re so inspired to see how colleges are taking the lead on addressing climate change,” said Avital Andrews, Sierra magazine’s lifestyle editor. “From building green to saving water to offering hundreds of eco-classes, these schools’ efforts are profound, and are changing not only the campus grounds, but also the minds of the students they’re educating.”

This is UC Irvine’s sixth consecutive year as a top 10 finalist and its second time in a row as Sierra’s winner, thanks in part to three on-campus solar projects, a 19-megawatt turbine cogeneration plant, and energy-efficiency goals that are consistently exceeded.

Other factors that helped those at the top of our list: dining halls that serve organic, local foods; waste systems that divert trash away from landfills; transportation options that keep students and staff out of cars; academic programs that are heavily eco-focused; and strong methods in place to conserve water and energy.

“Young people understand the need to confront climate disruption and jump-start our economy. That’s why students across the country have joined the Sierra Student Coalition’s Seize the Grid campaign — demanding 100 percent localized clean energy on campuses,” said Karissa Gerhke, national director of the Sierra Student Coalition. “‘Cool Schools’ is a showcase of campuses taking concrete steps toward those goals. We look forward to working with these schools in taking the next step and committing to 100 percent clean energy.”

The full ranking of 153 colleges, including each school’s completed questionnaire, is online at www.sierraclub.org/coolschools.

UW-River Falls ranked No. 24.

UW-Milwaukee ranked No. 68.

UW-Stevens Point ranked No. 70.

UW-Green Bay ranked No. 78.

UW-Whitewater ranked No. 94.

What are we reading? The Publishers Weekly best-seller list

HARDCOVER FICTION

1. “Edge of Eternity” by Ken Follett (Dutton Adult)

2. “Personal” by Lee Child (Delacorte)

3. “Somewhere Safe With Somebody Good” by Jan Karon (G.P. Putnam’s Sons)

4. “Festive in Death” by J.D. Robb (G.P. Putnam’s Sons)

5. “The Eye of Heaven” by Clive Cussler and Russell Blake (G.P. Putnam’s Sons)

6. “Raging Heat” by Richard Castle (Kingswell)

7. “Mean Streak” by Sandra Brown (Grand Central Publishing)

8. “The Bone Clocks” by David Mitchell (Random House)

9. “The Children Act” by Ian McEwan (Doubleday/Talese)

10. “The Golem of Hollywood” by Jonathan Kellerman (G.P. Putnam’s Sons)

11. “The Secret Place” by Tana French (Viking)

12. “Angels Walking” by Karen Kingsbury (S&S/Howard)

13. “The Monogram Murders” by Sophie Hannah (Morrow)

14. “All the Light We Cannot See” by Anthony Doerr (Scribner)

15. “Robert B. Parker’s Blind Spot” by Reed Farrel Coleman (G.P. Putnam’s Sons)

HARDCOVER NONFICTION

1. “Act Like a Success, Think Like a Success” by Steve Harvey (Amistad)

2. “13 Hours” by Mitchell Zuckoff with the Annex Security Team (Hachette/Twelve)

3. “Jesus on Trial” by David Limbaugh (Regnery)

4. “Zero to One” by Peter Thiel and Blake Masters (Crown Business)

5. “What If?” by Randall Munroe (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

6. “Unphiltered” by Phil Robertson (S&S/Howard)

7. “Guinness World Records 2015” by Guinness World Records (Guinness World Records)

8. “What I Know for Sure” by Oprah Winfrey (Flatiron)

9. “The Forks over Knives Plan” by Matt Lederman (S&S/Touchstone)

10. “World Order” by Henry Kissinger (Penguin Press)

11. “One Nation” by Ben Carson (Penguin/Sentinel)

12. “The Way of Serenity” by Jonathan Morris (HarperOne)

13. “The Roosevelts” by Geoffrey C. Ward (Knopf)

14. “This Changes Everything” by Naomi Klein (Simon & Schuster)

15. “Wheat Belly Total Health” by William Davis (Rodale)

MASS MARKET PAPERBACKS

1. “Sycamore Row” by John Grisham (Dell)

2. “Gone Girl” by Gillian Flynn (Broadway Books)

3. “The Best of Me” (movie tie-in)by Nicholas Sparks (Grand Central Publishing)

4. “Dust” by Patricia Cornwell (Berkley)

5. “The Final Cut” by Catherine Coulter (Jove)

6. “Mayan Secrets” by Clive Cussler and Thomas Perry (Berkely)

7. “To Love and Protect” by Debbie Macomber (Mira)

8. “The Homecoming” by Robyn Carr (Harlequin MIRA)

9. “12th of Never” by Patterson/Paetro (Vision)

10. “Texas Born” by Diana Palmer (Harlequin)

11. “W Is for Wasted” by Sue Grafton (Berkley)

12. “King and Maxwell” by David Baldacci (Grand Central Publishing)

13. “Winter of the World” by Ken Follett (Signet)

14. “Deserves to Die” by Lisa Jackson (Kensington/Zebra)

15. “Mercy” by Jodi Picoult (Pocket)

TRADE PAPERBACKS

1. “Gone Girl” (movie tie-in) by Gillian Flynn (Broadway Books)

2. “Gone Girl” by Gillian Flynn (Broadway Books)

3. “Unbroken” by Laura Hillenbrand (Random House)

4. “The Best of Me” by Nicholas Sparks (Grand Central Publishing)

5. “The Target” by David Baldacci (Grand Central Publishing)

6. “The Mystery of Shemitah” by Jonathan Cahn (Frontline)

7. “Private Down Under” by James Patterson and Michael White (Grand Central Publishing)

8. “The Boys in the Boat” by Daniel James Brown (Penguin)

9. “The Best Yes” by Lysa TerKeurst (Thomas Nelson)

10. “Sycamore Row” by John Grisham (Dell)

11. “Accused” by Lisa Scottoline (St. Martin’s Griffin)

12. “The Big Book of Easy Baking with Refrigerated Dough” by Pillsbury Editors (Pillsbury)

13. “The Alchemist” by Paulo Coelho (HarperOne)

14. “The River” by Beverly Lewis (Bethany House)

15. “Against All Grain” by Danielle Walker (Victory Belt)

Madison ranks No. 1 in ‘best places to live’ survey

Madison comes in at No. 1 on a list of “Top 100 Best Places to Live” in the United States.

The second-annual list from livability.com is based on eight factors: health care, education, social and civic capital, demographics, amenities, housing, economics and infrastructure.

Out of the eight criteria that cities were judged on, Madison scored highest in the housing category, according to the Greater Madison Convention and Visitors Bureau.

“This is a wonderful win for our city,” Deb Archer, GMCVB president and CEO, said in a news release. “It is our key assets — our top-ranked hospitals, first-rate University of Wisconsin-Madison and endless options for recreation — that make our citizens proud to call Madison home every day. Earning the top spot as the Most Livable City in America is both exciting and well deserved.”

The site said, “Whether you drill down into our quality-of-life statistics or analyze the city’s array of amenities, Madison stands out as Livability.com’s 2015 Best Place to Live. Both a capitol city and a hip college town, Madison provides residents with affordable housing, great schools, excellent health care and a wide range of recreational activities and entertainment options.”

The top 10 included: 

• No. 2, Rochester, Minnesota.

• No. 3, Arlington, Virginia.

• No. 4, Boulder, Colorado.

• No. 5, Palo Alto, California.

• No. 6, Berkeley, Califonria.

• No. 7, Santa Clara, California.

• No. 8, Missoula, Montana.

• No. 9, Boise, Idaho.

• No. 10, Iowa City, Iowa.

On the Web…

http://livability.com/best-places/top-100/2015

Wisconsin department wants input on changes to endangered species list

Wisconsin wildlife officials are seeking public comments on plans to update Wisconsin’s endangered or threatened species list by removing some species and adding others.

The state Department of Natural Resources is considering removing seven animals and nine plants from the list, including the barn owl, the snowy egret, bog bluegrass and hemlock parsley.

The agency says some of the species have responded well to protection and efforts to bolster their populations while others aren’t as rare as once thought or are no longer found in the state.

The DNR also wants to add eight species whose populations are declining, including three types of birds, one freshwater mussel and four types of insects.

The DNR has scheduled public hearings across the state on March 5 and March 6. People also can email or mail comments to the agency.

On the Web…

http://dnr.wi.gov/topic/endangeredresources/etlist.html