Tag Archives: food security

An apple a day RX? Madison announces program for docs to prescribe fruits, veggies

Some Madison residents are eligible for a program in which doctors prescribe healthy and fresh, organic fruits and vegetables.

The city announced the Fruit and Vegetable Prescription Program — FVRx — is focused at the neighborhood level, with financial support from Wholesome Wave and a partnership between Willy Street Co-op North and UW Health Northeast Family Medical.

Wholesome Wave is a national group dedicated to “affordable, healthy, local food for all.” Its mission is to empower under-served consumers to make healthier food choices by increasing affordable access to fresh, local food. The group funded the pilot with a $23,000 grant to the city of Madison.

Madison Mayor Paul Soglin said in a statement, “By collaborating with partners at Public Health Madison and Dane County, Willy Street Co-op, Second Harvest Foodbank and UW Health Northeast Family Medical Clinic, the city continues to illustrate how government and the community can work hand-in-hand to increase the well-being and health of all of our residents.”

Here’s how the program works: A patient can qualify for aid to help purchase produce and join the co-op if a doctor deems he or she does not have food security. Food security means a person has reliable access to enough affordable, nutritious food.

To qualify for the aid, a patient must answer yes to one of two questions:
• In the last year, have you worried about having enough food until you could buy more?
• In the last year, have you actually run out of food before you could buy more?

The aid comes in the form of a packet that includes a coupon to become a co-op owner and 60 $2 coupons that can be used in the produce department until the end of the year.

Participants can also join a program at the co-op that offers an additional 10 percent off of groceries and a free coupon to attend one of the co-op classes, which would normally charge a fee.

“The co-op is invested in continuing to expand the ways in which we can help address food security in Dane County,” said Kirsten Moore, director of cooperative services.

Moore said data collected from the pilot will help the co-op determine how to continue and fund these type of programs for the future.

“We already have some great ideas to share in the next few months, and we look forward to launching new initiatives to expand these offerings,” Moore said.

 

25 groups call on Scott Walker to restore food assistance

The following open letter to Gov. Scott Walker urges him to remove time limits for people on FoodShare who live in 20 counties and 10 cities in Wisconsin with high unemployment rates.

Dear Gov. Walker,

As FoodShare participants are losing food aid at higher than projected rates, we urge you to request a waiver from the U.S. Department of Agriculture from harmful FoodShare time limits and protect vulnerable Wisconsinites in areas that are lagging behind in economic recovery. Currently, up to 20 Wisconsin counties and 10 cities are eligible for a waiver from Time Limited Benefits in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. Wisconsin should request this waiver.

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), referred to as FoodShare in Wisconsin, assists low-income adults, children, and seniors in Wisconsin with funds to purchase groceries. In order to receive FoodShare benefits for more than three months within a three year time period, non-exempt able bodied adults without dependent children must work at least 20 hours per week, a requirement instituted under the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996. During the recent recession, elevated unemployment rates made many areas across Wisconsin eligible for a time limit waiver.

Prior to the economy fully recovering in all parts of the state, time limits for FoodShare were imposed statewide as of April 1, 2015. Those recipients who cannot find work on their own can maintain their benefits by participating in the state’s FoodShare Employment and Training Program (FSET), which is outsourced to private agencies contracted regionally throughout the state. Failure to meet an employment program’s mandates means individuals are eligible for only three months of FoodShare Time Limited Benefits out of every 36- month period.

In April through December of 2015, 62,458 individuals, or 7.7 percent of the total FoodShare recipients, were referred to FSET to meet the program mandates. During just the first six months of the disenrollment period, 30,453 people lost their benefits because they did not meet these mandates, including some who participated in FSET and were unable to gain sufficient employment as a result. This disenrollment is occurring much faster than originally projected – in 2013, the Legislative Fiscal Bureau projected a statewide disenrollment of 31,349 over the course of the entire first year of imposing time limits.

Unfortunately, mandating work does not create jobs. For those living in areas of high unemployment, the situation was already dismal. As a state, we must not take away food aid for failure to find a job in areas of our state where economic recovery is still hoped for rather than assured. Securing a job remains a significant challenge for many in Wisconsin, and unemployment continues to be high in particular parts of the state. Areas with persistently high unemployment are clustered in the rural northern portions of the state, while urban areas with high unemployment are located in the southeastern portion of the state. These parts of the state qualify as “Labor Surplus Areas” where there are significantly fewer jobs available than people looking for work. Disparities in our state are pronounced: while the unemployment rate in the majority of our state’s counties falls below that of the nation as a whole, several counties have unemployment rates above 9%. Thus, considering Wisconsin’s unemployment situation as a whole does not adequately capture the unique challenges faced by job seekers in different geographical locations across our state.

In addition, the FoodShare program is not only instrumental in improving food security for low income individuals and families, but it also increases spending in local economies as recipients purchase food within the community they live. The decline in FoodShare enrollment due to the reimplementation of Time Limited Benefits amounts to a monthly loss of approximately $3,244,271 in federal money spent at grocery stores in communities across Wisconsin. Finally, failure to seek a Time Limited Benefits waiver for qualifying areas in this state creates increased demand for emergency soup kitchens and food pantries, placing an unmanageable burden on local charitable resources to provide food. Mandatory FSET participation will continue to push people into deeper dependency as they become reliant upon charity for the basic need of food. Furthermore, forcing individuals to utilize charitable resources robs them of the dignity of going to the grocery store to select food that meets their nutritional needs and cultural preferences.

For all of these reasons, the undersigned organizations respectfully request that Wisconsin seek a waiver for eligible parts of our state and stop imposing three month time limits on receiving food aid in those areas.

Sincerely,

Hunger Task Force

Community Advocates

Public Policy Institute

Wisconsin Faith Voices for Justice

Lutheran Office for Public Policy in Wisconsin

Wisconsin Alliance for Women’s Health

Coalition of Wisconsin Aging Groups

WISDOM

Wisconsin Education Association Council

Wisconsin Council of Churches

Citizen Action of Wisconsin

9to5 Wisconsin

Wisconsin Council on Children and Families

Mental Health America of Wisconsin

Wisconsin Catholic Conference

Good Samaritan COGIC

Ebenezer COGIC

The Sharing Center Friedens

Food Pantry St. Veronica’s

Food Pantry La Causa

Amani Community Food Pantry

Family Life Center

Tosa Community Food Pantry

Daystar The Gathering

The Cathedral Center Milwaukee Inner-city Congregations Allied for Hope (MICAH)

Wisconsin Community Action Program Association (WISCAP)

Feeding Wisconsin

Greater Wisconsin Agency on Aging Resources, Inc. (GWAAR)

Jeremiah Missionary Baptist Church Food Pantry