Tag Archives: endorsement

Ellison says he’ll resign from Congress if elected DNC head

U.S. Rep. Keith Ellison remains the early favorite to become the next leader of the Democratic National Committee, amid resistance to the Minnesota liberal’s bid from key parts of the party’s base.

The contest is evolving into a larger fight over the future of the party.

Backers of Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders are throwing their support behind Ellison while some Hillary Clinton supporters are searching for an alternative.

Ellison picked up a powerful endorsement recently from the AFL-CIO, which issued a statement calling him a “proven leader.”

But his candidacy remains under siege.

Ellison has faced vocal criticism from prominent Democrats, Jewish groups and some union leaders, who have questioned his comments about Israel, his defense of Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan and his commitment to his own party.

Earlier this month, a union leader criticized the AFL-CIO for only including Ellison’s name, along with the choices to abstain or “make no endorsement at this time,” on the ballot sent to union members.

A federation faction “seems to want to push our movement further and further to the left,” Harold Schaitberger, president of the International Association of Fire Fighters, said in a recent statement. “That is a recipe for disaster as the most recent election results just showed.”

An editorial in an official Nation of Islam publication, “The Final Call,” quoted articles that Ellison wrote in the 1990s praising Farrakhan as a “sincere, tireless and uncompromising advocate.”

The editorial accused Ellison, the first Muslim-American elected to Congress, of being a “hypocrite” for now making a “cowardly and baseless repudiation” of Farrakhan.

Ellison did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Associated Press.

His history with the group has distressed some Jewish organizations. The Anti-Defamation League last week said Ellison’s past remarks about Israel were “disturbing and disqualifying,” and Haim Saban, a party donor deeply involved with Israeli issues, accused Ellison of being an “anti-Semite.”

Hoping to assuage some of the concerns, Ellison said he would resign his seat in Congress if he were picked as chairman by DNC members at the late February elections.

“Whoever wins the DNC chair race faces a lot of work, travel, planning and resource raising,” Ellison said in a statement. “I will be ‘all in’ to meet the challenge.”

The contest has divided Democratic leaders, placing Obama’s team at odds with Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid of Nevada and his replacement, New York’s Chuck Schumer, whose early support for Ellison was seen as an effort to shore up the liberal flank in Congress.

Part of the issue is personal. Ellison has, at times, broken ranks to criticize Obama, the head of the party he now hopes to lead.

While White House aides say that Obama is unlikely to publicly comment on the race, behind the scenes his backers have been speaking with Democratic donors and potential candidates to see who else might be persuaded to run, according to several Democrats familiar with the discussions. These Democrats were not authorized to publicly discuss those private discussions and spoke on condition of anonymity.

High on the White House’s list of preferred candidates is Labor Secretary Tom Perez, who’s weighing whether to run for the party job or for Maryland governor, said the Democrats.

A vocal contingent is pushing for a Latino leader at the DNC, arguing that the growing demographic group is crucial to the party’s future and should be represented at the highest levels.

Others have been trying to draft Vice President Joe Biden and former Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm, both of whom have ruled out a bid.

South Carolina’s party chairman, Jaime Harrison, and the party head in New Hampshire, Ray Buckley, have announced bids, though they haven’t gotten much traction.

Missouri’s secretary of state, Jason Kander, who attracted attention for running a surprisingly competitive Senate race this year, says he’s gotten calls exploring his interest in the post.

“I’m going to do all that I can for the cause of progress,” Kander said. “If it turns out that my party wants me to serve as chair I’m open to that.”

Ellison backers argue that the party must take a more populist approach after the 2016 losses, saying Democratic leaders did too little to address the economic pain of working-class voters.

“Keith brings a breath of fresh air to the Democratic party,” said DNC member Lee Saunders, president of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. “He believes in strengthening the economics for working families across the country.”

But some are more concerned with campaign mechanics than message, saying the party’s outreach, bench and fundraising languished under Wasserman Schultz.

“Ellison talks about vision when we need a fundraiser and organizer,” said Bob Mulholland, a longtime California Democratic operative and DNC member.

MoveOn, Humane Society launch ‘I’m with Purr’ push for Clinton

 MoveOn.org Political Action and the Humane Society Legislative Fund  teamed up to launch a new online ad highlighting Hillary Clinton’s record of animal protection and her “expansive” pro-animal campaign platform.

The ad was developed after MoveOn members said protecting animals is a key issue for them and the Humane Society Legislative Fund endorsed Clinton for president.

MoveOn.org represents millions of progressive members nationwide, according to a news release, and HSLF is a nonpartisan political advocacy organization that makes endorsements based on a candidate’s support for animal protection policies.

In their announcement for the campaign, the groups said: “During her eight years in the U.S. Senate, Hillary Clinton was a consistent supporter of animal protection policies, earning a 100 percent score in HSLF’s Humane Scorecard for the 108th Congress, a perfect 100 score in the 109th and an 83 in the 110th.”

In Congress, Clinton:

• Led efforts to stop the overuse of antibiotics in farm animals, which allow them to be crammed into overcrowded, stressful and unsanitary factory farms;

• Cosponsored legislation to prohibit the transport and receipt of horses to be slaughtered for human consumption;

• Cosponsored the Animal Fighting Prohibition Enforcement Act  (S. 261) to prohibit the interstate transfer of animals for animal fighting;

• Cosponsored the Downed Animal Protection Act (S. 1779) to stop the processing of “downer” livestock;

• Cosponsored the Puppy Protection Act (S. 1478) to crack down on abusive “puppy mills” where dogs are treated like production machines;

• Signed letters requesting funds for the U.S. Department of Agriculture to step up enforcement of the Animal Welfare Act, the Humane Methods of Slaughter Act and the federal animal fighting law

The statement from the groups said as secretary of state, Clinton led international efforts to crack down on wildlife trafficking and, through her work at the Clinton Foundation, she helped launch a major campaign against the illegal ivory trade and poaching of elephants.

Here’s the transcript of “I’m With Purr”: Humans aren’t the only ones with a stake in this election. Hillary has a bold platform to protect animals and wildlife.  She wants to:  Strengthen “puppy mill” regulations.  Reduce the overuse of antibiotics.  Pass the “Prevent Animal Cruelty and Torture Act.”  Vote Hillary Clinton.  #ImWithPurr.

Clinton statement on first-ever LGBT chamber endorsement

Hillary Clinton on Aug. 27 received the first presidential endorsement from the National Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce.

Clinton issued this statement:

I am honored to have earned the first-ever endorsement of the National Gay & Lesbian Chamber of Commerce.

For nearly 15 years, the NGLCC has paved the way for LGBT-owned and –allied businesses to succeed, grow, and find new clients and partners. Just this month, they brought together a record-breaking number of LGBT business leaders at their annual convention.

The stakes in this election could not be higher for LGBT Americans. When Donald Trump says he’ll ‘make America great again,’ that’s code for ‘take America backwards.’ He has said he would appoint judges who would overturn marriage equality.

The man Trump chose as his running mate signed a law that opened the door for Indiana businesses to discriminate against LGBT people and said marriage equality could cause ‘societal collapse.’ As we’ve seen in North Carolina, discrimination isn’t only wrong – it’s bad for business. North Carolina’s egregious HB2 measure has caused companies to pull jobs and millions of dollars out of the state.

We have our work cut out for us. As president, I’ll keep fighting for equality and opportunity for LGBT Americans by passing the Equality Act. And I want to be the small business president and make things easier for small businesses every step of the way. In America, if you can dream it, you should be able to build it – no matter where you come from, what you look like, or who you love. That’s why I have a comprehensive plan to make it easier to start a business, get the financing to grow, file taxes and work with the federal government, and provide good benefits to workers.

I am proud to stand with the NGLCC in this election and every day.

LaTonya Johnson best choice for 6th Senate District

State Rep. LaTonya Johnson is the best candidate to represent this Milwaukee Northwest Side district, which is currently represented by retiring Sen. Nikiya Harris Dodd. First elected in 2012, Johnson has proven herself as an effective progressive legislator.

Johnson, 44, earned a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice and previously owned and operated an in-home child care center for more than 10 years. In 2006, as a volunteer organizer, she helped create Milwaukee’s first union of childcare-providers. High-quality early childhood education is among her priorities, since it “provides a solid foundation for future learning and achievement.” She told WiG, “We need to talk about kids we lose before they enter middle school.”

The representative also believes MPS must be funded appropriately to give all children an opportunity to succeed, rather than increasingly diverting money away from MPS.

Johnson also supports a statewide mandate that charter and voucher schools receiving taxpayer funding must offer the federal free-and-reduced-lunch program. She said this will help ensure that all families can equitably access this crucial anti-poverty resource regardless of what publicly funded school they attend.

Johnson’s other priorities include criminal-justice reform and public safety (including keeping guns out of the hands of criminals), access to quality health care and economic development. She stresses the importance of small businesses and family-supporting jobs, including ones located within urban neighborhoods and accessible to people without cars.

Johnson’s opponents are Milwaukee School Board member Michael Bonds and Thomas Harris. Johnson has the strongest progressive bona fides in addition to experience in state government. Despite being part of the legislative minority, Johnson has coauthored nine bills that passed and became law during her four-year tenure. Her experience as a small-business owner and community activist, as well as her ability to work collaboratively, will also serve her well in the state Senate.

Endorsements include AFSCME Council 32, EMILY’s List, Wisconsin League of Conservation Voters, Wisconsin Working Families Party, Mayor Tom Barrett and state Sen. Nikiya Harris Dodd.

See also:

Milwaukee needs DA John Chisholm

Rep. Mandella Barnes for 4th Senate District

Edgar Lin for 16th Assembly District

Endorsement: Marisabel Cabrera is best choice for 9th Assembly District

Vote Edgar Lin for 16th Assembly District

Edgar Lin is challenging Rep. Leon Young in Assembly District 16, which stretches from the Northwest Side through Riverwest to Avenues West — and comprises a wide range of socioeconomic conditions. Lin, 32, told WiG he wants to bring “zealous advocacy and new solutions” to current problems.

Born in Taiwan, Lin and his family moved to California when he was a child. He earned an economics degree at Rutgers University and worked as a financial analyst. He discovered he did not “feel a passion for crunching numbers” and got itchy to have more impact on civic issues. So he decided to study law — which brought him to the University of Wisconsin. He completed a law-school internship in Sherman Park and moved to Milwaukee three years ago as an assistant state public defender, after working in that role in Appleton. He’s on an unpaid leave as he campaigns.

Lin says he is “pragmatic” and believes that by focusing on “common goals” it’s possible to be effective within a minority party.

Lin’s platform features detailed plans for economic development, including innovative approaches to encouraging startups and small businesses — a major source of stable local jobs. He told WiG “economic development — creating jobs — is the overarching theme in many, many sound policy issues.” He also wants to encourage the updating of job centers, hiring of local residents, and raising the minimum wage. He sees it as a moral issue that corporations pay workers enough that they don’t need government assistance.

Criminal justice reform is another priority. Lin advocates for those who have served time to be able to reconnect with their community through jobs and education, which reduces recidivism. He also said, “We need to treat addiction as a public-health issue, not a criminal-justice issue.”

Besides Young, Lin’s other opponents are Brandy Bond and Stephen Jansen. Lin is the best funded. He earned endorsements from the AFSCME, Citizen Action of Wisconsin, Federation of Nurses and Healthcare Professionals, League of Conservation Voters, Wisconsin Jobs Now and Wisconsin Progress, as well as by Ald. Nik Kovac and County Supervisor Marciela Nicholson.

See these other WiG other endorsements for Aug. 8:

Milwaukee needs DA John Chisholm

Rep. Mandella Barnes for 4th Senate District

State Rep. LaTonya Johnson for 6th Senate District

Endorsement: Marisabel Cabrera is best choice for 9th Assembly District

NRA endorses Paul Ryan for re-election

House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., earned an endorsement from the National Rifle Association Political Victory Fund in his re-election bid.

The gun group issued a statement quoting Chris Cox, chairman of the NRA-PVF. Both men took the stage at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland on July 19 to deliver prime-time speeches.

Cox, in the endorsement statement, said, “Paul Ryan’s leadership in the fight to preserve our Second Amendment rights and hunting heritage has earned him the trust and support of the National Rifle Association.

“As a lifelong outdoorsman and avid hunter, we can trust Paul to continue to fight for the Second Amendment rights of all law-abiding gun owners in Wisconsin and across the United States.”

Ryan and other Republicans held off a Democratic-driven campaign for gun reform this summer.

He also indicated that Democrats who staged a sit-in for reforms following a massacre at a gay nightclub in Florida might be punished by GOP leadership.

The NRA said Ryan received his “A+” from the pro-gun group, which is the highest rating a lawmaker can receive.

The NRA said Ryan has an “excellent voting record on all critical NRA issues” and also made a “vigorous effort to defend and promote the Second Amendment. He has strongly opposed President Obama’s numerous attempts to ban lawfully owned firearms, ammunition and magazines. Equally impressive, he has fought against the gun control agenda promoted by Obama, Hillary Clinton and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.”

Cox said, “The NRA is honored to endorse Paul Ryan and appreciates his steadfast support of the Second Amendment. The NRA encourages all gun-owners, hunters and sportsmen to vote re-elect Paul Ryan this November.”

Ryan actually faces a primary challenge in August — Paul Nehlen.

Democrats who filed to run for the seat include Tom Breu and Ryan Solen.

Transcript: Sanders endorses Clinton at New Hampshire rally

U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders on July 12 endorsed Hillary Clinton, the presumptive Democratic Party presidential nominee. Sanders declared, “Hillary Clinton will make an outstanding president and I am proud to stand with her here today.”

The following is Sanders’ remarks, as prepared for delivery:

Let me begin by thanking the 13 million Americans who voted for me during the Democratic primaries. Let me also thank the people here in New Hampshire who gave us our first big win and a special thanks to the people of Vermont whose support for so many years has sustained me.

Let me also thank the hundreds of thousands of volunteers in every state in our country who worked so hard on our campaign and the millions of our contributors who showed the world that we could run a successful national campaign based on small individual contributions – 2 1/2 million of them.

Together, we have begun a political revolution to transform America and that revolution continues. Together, we continue the fight to create a government which represents all of us, and not just the one percent – a government based on the principles of economic, social, racial and environmental justice.

I am proud of the campaign we ran here in New Hampshire and across the country. Our campaign won the primaries and caucuses in 22 states, and when the roll call at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia is announced it will show that we won almost 1,900 delegates. That is a lot of delegates, far more than almost anyone thought we could win. But it is not enough to win the nomination. Secretary Clinton goes into the convention with 389 more pledged delegates than we have and a lot more super delegates.

Secretary Clinton has won the Democratic nominating process, and I congratulate her for that. She will be the Democratic nominee for president and I intend to do everything I can to make certain she will be the next president of the United States.

I have come here today not to talk about the past but to focus on the future. That future will be shaped more by what happens on November 8 in voting booths across our nation than by any other event in the world. I have come here to make it as clear as possible as to why I am endorsing Hillary Clinton and why she must become our next president.

During the last year I had the extraordinary opportunity to speak to more than 1.4 million Americans at rallies in almost every state in this country. I was also able to meet with many thousands of other people at smaller gatherings. And the profound lesson that I have learned from all of that is that this campaign is not really about Hillary Clinton, or Donald Trump or Bernie Sanders, or any other candidate who sought the presidency. This campaign is about the needs of the American people and addressing the very serious crises that we face. And there is no doubt in my mind that, as we head into November, Hillary Clinton is far and away the best candidate to do that.

It is easy to forget where we were seven and a half years ago when President Obama came into office. As a result of the greed, recklessness and illegal behavior on Wall Street, our economy was in the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression. Some 800,000 people a month were losing their jobs, we were running up a record-breaking deficit of $1.4 trillion dollars and the world’s financial system was on the verge of collapse. We have come a long way in the last seven and a half years and I thank President Obama and Vice President Biden for their leadership in pulling us out of that terrible recession. But, I think we can all agree, much, much more needs to be done.

Too many people in America are still being left out, left behind and ignored. In the richest country in the history of the world there is too much poverty, and too much despair.

This election is about the single mom I saw in Nevada who, with tears in her eyes, told me that she was scared to death about the future because she and her young daughter were not making it on the $10.45 cents an hour she was earning. This election is about that woman, and the millions of other workers in this country who are falling further and further behind as they try to survive on totally inadequate wages.

Hillary Clinton understands that we must fix an economy in America that is rigged and that sends almost all new wealth and income to the top one percent. Hillary Clinton understands that if someone in America works 40 hours a week, that person should not be living in poverty. She believes that we should raise the minimum wage to a living wage. And she wants to create millions of new jobs by rebuilding our crumbling infrastructure. – our roads, bridges, water systems and wastewater plants.

But her opponent – Donald Trump – well, he has a very different view. He believes that states should have the right to lower the minimum wage or even abolish the concept of the minimum wage altogether. If Donald Trump is elected, we will see no increase in the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour – a starvation wage.

This election is about which candidate will nominate Supreme Court justices who are prepared to overturn the disastrous Citizens United decision which allows billionaires to buy elections and undermine our democracy; about who will appoint new justices on the Supreme Court who will defend a woman’s right to choose, the rights of the LGBT community, workers’ rights, the needs of minorities and immigrants, and the government’s ability to protect the environment.

If you don’t believe this election is important, take a moment to think about the Supreme Court justices that Donald Trump will nominate, and what that means to civil liberties, equal rights and the future of our country.

This campaign is about moving the United States toward universal health care and reducing the number of people who are uninsured or under-insured. Hillary Clinton wants to see that all Americans have the right to choose a public option in their health care exchange, which will lower the cost of health care. She also believes that anyone 55 years or older should be able to opt in to Medicare and she wants to see millions more Americans gain access to primary health care, dental care, mental health counseling and low-cost prescription drugs through a major expansion of community health centers throughout this country. Hillary is committed to seeing thousands of young doctors, nurses, psychologists, dentists and other medical professionals practice in underserved areas as we follow through on President Obama’s idea of tripling funding for the National Health Service Corps.

In New Hampshire, in Vermont and across the country we have a major epidemic of opiate and heroin addiction. People are dying every day from overdoses. Hillary Clinton understands that if we are serious about addressing this crisis we need major changes in the way we deliver mental health treatment. That’s what expanding community health centers will do and that is what getting medical personnel into the areas we need them most will do.

And What is Donald Trump’s position on health care? No surprise there. Same old, same old Republican contempt for working families. He wants to abolish the Affordable Care Act, throw 20 million people off of the health insurance they currently have and cut Medicaid for lower-income Americans. The last thing we need today in America is a president who doesn’t care about whether millions will lose access to the health care coverage that they desperately need. We need more people with access to quality health care, not fewer.

Hillary Clinton also understands that millions of seniors, disabled vets and others are struggling with the outrageously high cost of prescription drugs. She and I are in agreement that Medicare must negotiate drug prices with the pharmaceutical industry and that we must expand the use of generic medicine. Drug companies should not be making billions in profits while one in five Americans are unable to afford the medicine they need. The greed of the drug companies must end.

This election is about the grotesque level of income and wealth inequality that currently exists, the worst it has been since 1928. Hillary Clinton knows that something is very wrong when the very rich become richer while many others are working longer hours for lower wages. She knows that it is absurd that middle-class Americans are paying an effective tax rate higher than hedge fund millionaires, and that there are corporations in this country making billions in profit while they pay no federal income taxes in a given year because of loopholes their lobbyists created. While Hillary Clinton supports making our tax code fairer, Donald Trump wants to give hundreds of billions of dollars in tax breaks to the very wealthiest people in this country. His reckless economic policies will not only exacerbate income and wealth inequality, they would increase our national debt by trillions of dollars.

This election is about the thousands of young people I have met who have left college deeply in debt, the many others who cannot afford to go to college and the need for this country to have the best educated workforce in the world if we are to compete effectively in a highly competitive global economy. Hillary Clinton believes that we must substantially lower student debt, and that we must make public colleges and universities tuition free for the middle class and working families of this country. This is a major initiative that will revolutionize higher education in this country and improve the lives of millions. Think of what it will mean when every child in this country, regardless of the income of their family, knows that if they study hard and do well in school – yes, they will be able to get a college education and leave school without debt.

This election is about climate change, the greatest environmental crisis facing our planet, and the need to leave this world in a way that is healthy and habitable for our kids and future generations. Hillary Clinton is listening to the scientists who tell us that if we do not act boldly in the very near future there will be more drought, more floods, more acidification of the oceans, more rising sea levels. She understands that we must work with countries around the world in transforming our energy system away from fossil fuels and into energy efficiency and sustainable energy – and that when we do that we can create a whole lot of good paying jobs. Donald Trump: Well, like most Republicans, he chooses to reject science – something no presidential candidate should do. He believes that climate change is a hoax. In fact, he wants to expand the use of fossil fuel. That would be a disaster for our country and our planet.

This election is about the leadership we need to pass comprehensive immigration reform and repair a broken criminal justice system. It’s about making sure that young people in this country are in good schools or at good jobs, not in jail cells. Secretary Clinton understands that we don’t need to have more people in jail than any other country on earth, at an expense of $80 billion a year.

In these stressful times for our country, this election must be about bringing our people together, not dividing us up. While Donald Trump is busy insulting Mexicans, Muslims, women, African Americans and veterans, Hillary Clinton understands that our diversity is one of our greatest strengths. Yes. We become stronger when black and white, Latino, Asian American, Native American – all of us – stand together. Yes. We become stronger when men and women, young and old, gay and straight, native born and immigrant fight to rid this country of all forms of bigotry.

It is no secret that Hillary Clinton and I disagree on a number of issues. That’s what this campaign has been about. That’s what democracy is about. But I am happy to tell you that at the Democratic Platform Committee which ended Sunday night in Orlando, there was a significant coming together between the two campaigns and we produced, by far, the most progressive platform in the history of the Democratic Party. Our job now is to see that platform implemented by a Democratic Senate, a Democratic House and a Hillary Clinton president – and I am going to do everything I can to make that happen.

I have known Hillary Clinton for 25 years. I remember her as a great first lady who broke precedent in terms of the role that a first lady was supposed to play as she helped lead the fight for universal health care. I served with her in the United States Senate and know her as a fierce advocate for the rights of children.

Hillary Clinton will make an outstanding president and I am proud to stand with her here today.

Sanders could endorse Clinton on Tuesday

U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders is set to throw his support behind fellow Democrat Hillary Clinton’s bid for the White House on Tuesday during a rally they will hold together in New Hampshire, ending a bitterly fought battle for the presidential nomination that had fractured the party.

An endorsement from Sanders could boost Clinton’s chances against Republican rival Donald Trump in the Nov. 8 election, and comes after she offered Sanders  concessions on policy issues like education, health care and climate change.

At the New Hampshire event, the pair will discuss a shared “commitment to building an America that is stronger together and an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top,” according to statements released Monday by both campaigns.

The rally will be the first of many in which Sanders will “be out there stumping for the Democratic nominee,” Sanders campaign manager Jeff Weaver said. Weaver would not confirm whether Sanders would formally endorse Clinton on Tuesday.

Sanders had been under pressure for weeks from Democratic Party officials to throw his weight behind Clinton after she locked up the required number of nominating convention delegates last month with a string of wins in state-by-state primary contests.

The former U.S. secretary of state, senator, and first lady needs Sanders’ supporters to boost her chances against Trump in her run for the White House. Only about 40 percent of Sanders’ supporters say they would vote for her, according to recent Reuters/Ipsos polling.

In the past few weeks, both camps have been in regular contact on how to bring Clinton closer to some of Sanders’ progressive stances on issues like wealth inequality, trade, healthcare, education, and the environment in an effort to unify the party, according to Weaver.

Weaver said he and Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook “talk every day, basically, at this point” and said recent shifts in Clinton’s healthcare and education proposals, released last week, were the result of “many, many discussions back and forth about our views.”

Other policy priorities for the senator from Vermont included a $15-an-hour national minimum wage, which was incorporated into the party’s platform at a meeting in Orlando, Florida, this weekend, as well as criminal justice reform and action on climate change.

 

 

 

Pocan says he’s undecided on Clinton, Sanders

Democratic U.S. Rep. Mark Pocan says he does not know whether he will vote for Hillary Clinton or Bernie Sanders on April 5 in Wisconsin’s presidential preference primary.

The liberal congressman from Madison said that he likes both candidates and either one would be better than any Republican running for president.

U.S. Rep. Mark Pocan, D-Wisconsin. — PHOTO: Courtesy
U.S. Rep. Mark Pocan, D-Wisconsin. — PHOTO: Courtesy

Pocan is also one of 10 Democratic super delegates in Wisconsin who can support whichever candidate they wish, regardless of whom primary voters back.

The representative says he wants to wait until after the last primary in June to decide who he will cast his super delegate vote for.

And he acknowledges it could be for someone different from who he votes for on April 5.

Five other Wisconsin super delegates have said they will back Clinton.

On the Web

Details for April 5 voting in Wisconsin.

Fair Wisconsin, state’s largest LGBT group, endorses Clinton

Fair Wisconsin PAC today announced its endorsement of Hillary Clinton in next week’s Wisconsin Democratic presidential primary.

In a press statement announcing the endorsement, the group’s political action committee called Clinton “a champion for LGBT equality.”

Fair Wisconsin is the state’s largest organization dedicated to advancing and achieving equality for LGBT Wisconsinites.

The press statement said in part:

“In the U.S. Senate, Clinton championed hate crime legislation, fought for federal non-discrimination legislation to protect LGBT Americans in the workplace, and advocated for an end to restrictions that blocked LGBT Americans from adopting children. As Secretary of State, she advanced LGBT rights abroad and enforced stronger anti-discrimination regulations within the State Department, declaring on the global stage that “gay rights are human rights, and human rights are gay rights.”

Clinton’s LGBT agenda

FW went on to praise Clinton for having “the most comprehensive and far-reaching LGBT policy agenda ever produced by a presidential candidate.” The group detailed her LGBT agenda, which includes:

Fighting for full federal equality for LGBT Americans. Clinton has said that she would work with Congress to pass the Equality Act, continue President Obama’s LGBT equality executive actions, and support efforts to clarify that sex discrimination includes discrimination on the basis of “gender identity.”

Supporting LGBT youth, parents, and elders. Clinton has vowed to pass the Safe Schools Improvement Act and the Student Non-Discrimination Act to combat bullying.

Honoring the military service of LGBT people. Clinton said that as commander-in-chief she would upgrade the service records of LGBT veterans dismissed due to their sexual orientation and support efforts to allow transgender personnel to serve openly.

Securing affordable treatment for people living with HIV and AIDS. Clinton would work with governors to extend Medicaid coverage to people living with HIV, cap out-of pocket expenses for people with HIV/AIDS, and expand the utilization of HIV prevention medications, including pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP).

Protecting and advancing transgender rights. Clinton would direct the federal government to improve its reporting of hate crimes and streamline identity documents that impose barriers on transgender Americans seeking official identification documents.

Promoting human rights of LGBT people around the world. Clinton would continue to ensure America’s foreign policy is inclusive of LGBT people around the world. She would increase the U.S. investment in the Global Equality Fund to advance the human rights of LGBT people around the world.

For a full list of Clinton’s endorsements, click here.

Information in this report was provided by Fair Wisconsin.