Tag Archives: book

Alec Baldwin finds new way to mock Trump

Alec Baldwin has found a new way to mock Donald Trump.

Baldwin is teaming with author Kurt Andersen on the satirical book “You Can’t Spell America Without Me: The Really Tremendous Inside Story of My Fantastic First Year as President Donald J. Trump,” Penguin Press announced this week.

The book is scheduled to come out Nov. 7, almost exactly a year to the day that Trump stunned the world by being elected president, and ensured many more appearances by Baldwin as Trump on “Saturday Night Live.”

Baldwin is having a busy year as a writer.

His memoir, “Nevertheless,” comes out in April.

Historian says key witness acknowledges she lied about Emmett Till

The woman at the center of the trial of Emmett Till’s alleged killers has acknowledged that she falsely testified he made physical and verbal threats, according to a new book.

Historian Timothy B. Tyson told The Associated Press that Carolyn Donham broke her long public silence in an interview with him in 2008.

His book, The Blood of Emmett Till, comes out next week.

“She told me that ‘Nothing that boy did could ever justify what happened to him,’” said Tyson, a Duke University research scholar whose previous books include Blood Done Sign My Name and Radio Free Dixie.

Emmett Till was a 14-year-old black tortured and killed in 1955 in Mississippi after allegedly whistling at a white woman, then known as Carolyn Bryant.

His murder became national news, was a galvanizing event in the civil rights movement and has been the subject of numerous books and movies.

During the trial, Bryant said Emmett Till had grabbed her, and, in profane terms, bragged about his history with white women. The jury was not present when she testified.

Donham’s then-husband, Roy Bryant, and his half-brother, J.W. Milam, were acquitted by the all-white jury. Both men, who later told Look magazine they did murder Emmett Till, have since died. Milam’s widow, Juanita Milam, would later tell the FBI she believed Carolyn Bryant had fabricated her story. Juanita Milam died in 2014.

The Justice Department re-examined the case a decade ago, but no one was indicted as a murderer or an accomplice.

On Saturday, the maker of a documentary about Emmett Till said he had long been sure that Bryant’s story was false.

“His mother had mentioned that Emmett had a speech impediment and that the things Bryant claimed he was saying he could not have said easily,” said Keith Beauchamp, whose The Untold Story of Emmett Till came out in 2005.

Tyson said he spoke with Donham after her daughter-in-law, Marsha Bryant, contacted him. Bryant had read Blood Done Sign My Name, about a racist murder during his childhood in Oxford, North Carolina, and invited Tyson to meet with her and Donham.

Tyson said he and Donham had two conversations, both lasting 2-3 hours, and that he planned at the time to place the material in the archives at the University of North Carolina.

Asked why he waited so long to publicize his findings, he responded that historians think in different terms than do journalists.

“I’m more interested in what speaks to the ages than in what is the latest media thing,” he said.

He added that he wasn’t sure whether Donham knew about the book. He said he had fallen out of touch with the family and that when he last spoke with Bryant, a few years ago, she said Donham was in poor health.

Emmett Till was a teenager from Chicago visiting the Mississippi Delta and helping out on his great-uncle Mose Wright’s farm.

On Aug. 24, 1955, Emmett Till and some other kids drove to a local store, Bryant’s, for refreshments. At Bryant’s, some of the kids stayed on the porch, watching a game of checkers, while the others filed inside to buy bubble gum and sodas. Carolyn Bryant, the 21-year-old wife of proprietor Roy Bryant, was behind the counter.

Accounts of what happened next differ.

Mrs. Bryant claimed Emmett bragged about dating white women up north. She said he grabbed her and asked her, “How about a date, baby?” Simeon Wright, his cousin, heard none of this. But there is no doubt about what he heard when they left the store, he told the AP in 2005.

Standing on the front porch, Emmett let out a wolf whistle.

Carolyn Donham’s whereabouts have long been a mystery, but North Carolina voter rolls list a Carolyn Holloway Donham. Holloway is her maiden name.

The address is for a green, split-level home in Raleigh at the mouth of a neat cul-de-sac just two turns off a busy four-lane thoroughfare. The well-tended house has burnt-orange shutters and a front-facing brick chimney decorated with a large metal sunburst. Orange flags emblazed with the word “Google” dot the lawn.

A woman, who appeared to be of late middle age, and a small barking dog appeared at the front door. When a reporter asked if this was the Bryant family home, the woman replied, “Yes.”

When asked if Carolyn Donham was at home, the woman replied, “She’s not available.”

At first, she refused to accept a business card, but relented after hearing about the upcoming book.

The Emmett Till Legacy Foundation has shared news reports about the book on Instagram and asked if Donham would have the “decency and courage” to speak with Emmett Till’s relatives.

A seasoned film critic eyes TV’s biography

At 75, David Thomson is the sultan of cinema criticism. British-born but long based in America, he is the author of nearly two dozen film-related books including “Moments that Made the Movies,” “’Have You Seen…?’: A Personal Introduction to 1,000 Films” and “The New Biographical Dictionary of Film.”

Now Thomson has switched his gaze, and his analysis, to the TV medium.

In “Television: A Biography” (Thames & Hudson, $34.95), David Thomson focuses on TV from its individual genres to its broad social impact during the past 70 years. As ever, his writing is bright, puckish and reader-friendly.

At 400 pages, the book is a bit weighty, but not the prose.

But what made Thomson, who had never before put his take on TV between covers, decide to change channels? During a recent interview, he explained.

“I was at a point where I felt that the movies were not really going anywhere very exciting, and that if you were looking for the best American movies, you probably needed to look at television. ‘The Wire,’ ‘The Sopranos,’ ‘Breaking Bad’ — they were so much more ambitious than anything made for theaters.

So I began to develop an historical perspective on TV that I had had on the movies for a long time. I’m much more interested now in thinking about and writing about TV than the movies.”

A VIEWER’S BOOK

“You may have watched a lot of TV but never thought systematically about it. I wanted to do a book which would give you a sense that the totality of the medium had been addressed. Not covered, but addressed. And if you have never watched television, after you read this book I think you can say, ‘I understand what television is.””

A DIFFERENT CREATURE

“Our relationship with TV is different than with almost any medium we’ve had before. It’s all well and good for something on TV to be so riveting that you don’t want to miss a moment. But when you tune in to watch one show, you may end up just watching TV overall. There’s such a lot on television that is sort of tidal — it just washes in and out, over you. You turn it on like you would turn on a light, and you may be doing other things. But even if you’re not watching, it enters into you in ambient ways.”

SHORT LIST

Thomson, film’s consummate list-maker, shared “off the top of my head” a few pick TV hits:

“Monty Python’s Flying Circus” … the BBC version of “The Singing Detective” … live coverage of the funeral of President John F. Kennedy … “Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In” … “a couple of episodes of ‘All in the Family’ where Edith is just sublime” … the ESPN documentary series “O.J.: Made in America,” which he calls “a major work” … and, of course, “Breaking Bad.”

“But this time tomorrow,” he cautions, “I would revise the whole list.”

TV PRESIDENT

“With Donald Trump in the White House, I think we’re going to get more of the same as with the campaign: His administration will have to be judged as an ongoing TV show. He is a television person, so I think it’s going to be a presidency of shows and moments. My instinct is, in terms of policy, he’s doing to be dreadfully disappointing to his supporters. But on TV, I think it’s going to be amazing _ until it becomes grotesque.”

LOOKING AHEAD

“We watch stories and stars, but it’s more and more evident that, as TV viewers, we go where the technology takes us. My sense of television is that technology has always driven the whole thing, and I think that will continue. I think more sophisticated, interesting fusions of what we still call television with the computer are going to occur. That will be more important than any sort of new genre or new narrative form in entertainment. And I see the end of the movie house. But it’s inevitable that a cellphone will be built into our hands. So maybe a screen could be implanted in our heads. I think that will happen!”

 

Dublin’s murder squad hunts for a killer in ‘The Trespasser’

Though Detective Antoinette Conway always dreamed of working in the murder squad, now that she’s made it to the Dublin Castle grounds where Ireland’s best detectives track down killers, she wants out.

Her co-workers harass her, and the majority of cases that make it to her desk involve domestic disputes, not the psychopathic serial killers she’d imagined hunting. When her boss assigns Antoinette and her partner a new case complete with a smarmy third detective to act as a baby sitter, Antoinette considers this her last stint on the squad before trading in her badge for a job at a security agency.

When they arrive at the scene, Antoinette stares into the face of the murder victim, Aislinn Murray, and recognizes her, though she can’t place the memory. The scene of the crime, complete with a candlelit table set for two and dinner in the oven, points to yet another date gone bad.

This should be a slam dunk. But from here, the case proves a wild animal nobody can read, sometimes bounding in a predictable direction, other times leaping down a path that catches everyone off guard. On top of this, Antoinette notices a strange man frequenting the road outside her house.

Author Tana French incessantly pushes the plot of The Trespasser forward with absorbing dialogue and shifty villains. When the investigation hits walls, relationships grow and morph, making the work as much about internal conflicts as external. Antoinette narrates with a rich, raw voice. Her sarcasm combined with a wry, hard-edged view on life may weary readers, but keep reading, because as in all of the author’s work, meaning lurks beneath every quip and glance.

French not only spins a twisty cop tale, she also encases it in meticulous prose, creating a read that is as elegant as it is dark.

Wee, weird heroes star in ‘Miss Peregrine’s Home’

After a steady stream this year of Batman, Superman, Captain America, X-Men and even Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, it’s time now for a group of kids who float, are invisible, who spark fire, manipulate plants, control bees and give life to inanimate objects. Not really, X-Men exactly. Call them X-Tweens.

They’re the unlikely young heroes and heroines of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, the Tim Burton-directed 3-D film loosely based on the novel of the same name by Ransom Riggs.

Sweet, with some mind-blowing visual effects, it’s the perfect film for your young disaffected mutant friends.

Asa Butterfield (Martin Scorsese’s Hugo) plays a young adult who stumbles upon a secret refuge for supernaturally gifted youngsters hiding in a time loop in 1943.

Our hero befriends the mysterious schoolmarm Miss Peregrine (a delicious Eva Green, channeling a sexy Mary Poppins by way of Helena Bonham Carter) and learns that the children are in danger from ever-growing malevolent forces.

Burton is a natural choice to direct: The material already has that gloomy, Victorian vibe, a stylized dreamlike quality and a sort of Goth-punk look, which is catnip to the director of Edward Scissorhands.

He also famously adores misfits; here, the screen is filled with them.

No surprise the job of turning the book into a film was handed to Jane Goldman, who is familiar both with mutants and the 1940s, having been the screenwriter for X-Men: First Class. A somewhat ponderous first half leads to a hard-charging second, filled with ingenious fight-scenes, glorious ocean liners and sublime underwater moments.

The film should come with a Harry Potter-like warning for those allergic to new whimsical vocabulary terms like “ymbrines,” “Hollows” and “hollowgasts.”

But go with it.

Your head will be in pain soon enough trying to make sense of the increasingly elaborate rules of time-travel and body shifting.

The peculiar children of the film’s title are certainly unique but you can find plenty of other films in the DNA of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, particularly skeleton soldiers from Jason and the Argonauts, the X-Men franchise for making freaks lovable, Groundhog Day and even the underappreciated Hayden Christensen film Jumper, which also has time shifting at its core and the same sort of evil force in Samuel L. Jackson.

Hyper-stylized films like Burton’s usually create stiff performances, but Terence Stamp is grounded as a knowing grandfather and Chris O’Dowd is perfectly oafish as a clueless dad.

Other cameos are by Judi Dench, Allison Janney and Rupert Everett (blink and you miss them). Ella Purnell is lovely and understated as a love interest; she’s buoyant, in more ways than one.

So stretch your definition of heroes to include, say, a cute little girl with razor-sharp teeth on the back of her head. Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children has all the making of a super franchise — the call of destiny, the making of heroes and the embrace of kinship. Plus, of course, coming to terms with your inner freak.

Bernie’s book: Sanders has publishing deal

Sen. Bernie Sanders is preparing to take his message to the printed page. Thomas Dunne Books said it will publish Sanders’ “Our Revolution: A Future to Believe In.”

The book is scheduled to come out Nov. 15, a week after election day. It will include both his policy ideas for the future and reflections on his surprisingly strong run in the primaries.

The 74-year-old Sanders, an independent from Vermont who caucuses with Democrats in the Senate, attracted millions of voters with his blunt rhetoric and progressive agenda of raising taxes on the rich, overhauling campaign financing and providing universal health care and free college education.

“Bernie Sanders quickly became the leader of the progressive movement within the Democratic Party,” Dunne said in a statement. “Garnering over 13 million votes, winning 23 primaries and caucuses, and receiving more than 7 million individual donations to his cause, he energized the party as he fought for the average American with unrelenting energy and passion. (The book) will be an inside account of this extraordinary campaign, and will also provide a blueprint for future political action. Its message: the fight has just begun.”

Financial details were not disclosed.

Books on presidential campaigns are an established publishing genre, but it’s unusual for a candidate to reach a deal so soon after the race and to have the book come out soon after the election.

In a statement to the AP, Thomas Dunne said a Sanders book was first suggested to him earlier this year by the Washington-based agent Ronald Goldfarb, with whom the senator has mutual friends.

Sanders was initially too busy to consider the project, but decided “a book about his philosophy and ideas coming out after the election was a good idea.”

The publisher said he and Sanders reached an agreement a few weeks ago.

“Throughout the year, both Bernie and his wife, Jane, kept records and notes. Sanders is using these as the basis for much of the text,” Dunne said, adding that Sanders will write the book himself.

“He will write about his early life as well as the campaign and the issues he cares so passionately about. Moreover, the final section, presently called ‘Where Do We Go From Here?’ will outline a program of progressive activism for the coming years, a cause he is passionately committed to. “

The book could well offer a critical take on Clinton, as Sanders often challenged her on her ties to Wall Street and questioned her willingness to take on wealthy special interests.

It’s not uncommon for copies of a book to leak a week or more before the release date, raising the possibility that any negative comments on Clinton could be seen before Election Day.

Sanders is co-author of a previous book, “Outsider in the White House.”

Maggie Gyllenhaal put in long hours on ‘Karenina’ audiobook

One of Maggie Gyllenhaal’s favorite books is “Anna Karenina.” So when she was asked to read the classic novel out loud for an audiobook, she didn’t hesitate.

“I thought, ‘This will be amazing. I’ll just sit in a room and re-read ‘Anna Karenina’ out loud,”” Gyllenhaal recalled. “I just loved the book so much I thought, ‘Yes, let’s try and do it.’”

Cold, hard reality set in after her first recording session. Leo Tolstoy’s masterpiece is over 1,000 pages and extremely complicated.

“A sentence will begin in one place and end really somewhere else. I couldn’t cold read it. It just wasn’t possible,” said the star of “Crazy Heart” and “The Dark Knight.”

So Gyllenhaal realized she’d have to do homework and put in long hours at the studio. The result is a moving and dramatic version, available Tuesday by audio seller and producer Audible Inc .

“It was amazing. I learned things about myself from reading the book in the way that I think a lot of people learn things about themselves from reading the book, whether its aloud or to yourself. And I learned different things about myself at 37 doing it than I learned when I was 25, which is also the mark of an amazing book.”

Gyllenhaal recorded the book in lower Manhattan over the winter while her husband, Peter Sarsgaard, was filming a movie in Paris. The plan originally was for 10 six-hour sessions, but it turned into more like 30 four-hour sessions.

She prepared for each one by reading a different translation of “Anna Karenina” the night before, trying to stay 50-100 pages ahead so she could anticipate what came next in the recording studio.

“There were days when I got behind, but very few, because I found it was not really possible. There was one part when I got ahead of myself and I was cold reading in the room. I remember gasping at something I hadn’t remembered.”

One thing Gyllenhaal refused to do was adopt Russian accents to enliven the masterpiece about love, betrayal and death among the elite in imperial Russia.

“My skill really is not doing voices. I don’t know how to do that. That seems silly to me. At the same time, of course, you want to create a world for people. But my skill is basically finding a deep kind of empathy for whomever I’m playing _ everything from their point of view. And ‘Anna Karenina’ is the perfect book for that.”

There was an added benefit: While she was reading the book, Gyllenhaal said she felt more engaged in life, going to three plays and an art exhibit.

“I found when I was reading the book that my brain was being exercised in the same way that when you’re running a lot you all of a sudden feel the strength in your body.”

‘Siddhartha’s Brain’ smart take on meditation

It’s a pleasure to read “Siddhartha’s Brain,” which comes from a science journalist with long experience of explaining ideas for readers of The Guardian and other publications. James Kingsland even includes guided meditation exercises throughout a book that explores mindfulness and its benefits.

“Siddhartha’s Brain: Unlocking the Ancient Science of Enlightenment” (William Morrow), by James Kingsland.

“For contemplatives with a tendency to intellectualize — which would probably include people who read books about the science of enlightenment — mindfulness of breathing is strongly recommended,” he suggests at one point. Others might focus on compassion, or on the putrefaction of the body if easily distracted by sensual desire.

Kingsland draws from the life of Siddhartha Gautama, founder of Buddhist philosophy and practice, and from research and personal exploration to show what lies behind the book’s striking first sentence: “‘We are all mentally ill,’ said the smiling monk in the wide-brimmed hat, as if this explained everything.”

Anyone familiar with meditation will know that it involves not avoiding uncomfortable feelings but focusing on them calmly and with detachment. But Kingsland wants to know how this came to be. “What has gone so wrong during the evolution of the human brain that it needs to be fixed by meditation? Curiously, no one I spoke to during my research for this book had given much thought to this question.”

This is a smart, accessible balance of philosophical teachings and brain science and how meditation can relate to everything from addiction to Alzheimer’s disease.

Whether you are comfortable with being alone with your wandering mind or avoid it at all costs, you’ll learn something useful from this book.

Joel Grey, now unburdened and emboldened, tells his story

At a cafe the other day, Joel Grey was drawn to an item on the menu that was both confusing and intriguing.

He called over a waiter and asked: “What is this thing? The herbed goat cheese with chili flakes and pomegranate syrup?” The waiter was stumped. “OK, I’m going to take a chance,” said the Tony-and Oscar-winning actor.

Grey, 83, was in high spirits this day, which marked the publication of his memoir, “Master of Ceremonies.” For a performer who hid who he was for decades, Grey is now unburdened and emboldened.  

“Let’s put it this way: I really feel good. But I have been feeling good for a long time. I don’t think I could have written this book if I’d had axes to grind,” he said. “I don’t like that in a book.”

The memoir traces his childhood in Cleveland, his rise as a nightclub performer and his breakthrough both on stage and film as the Emcee with rouged cheeks and cupid’s-bow lips in “Cabaret.”

It also examines his 24-year marriage to actress Jo Wilder and a long internal struggle with his attraction to men, which triggered feelings of self-loathing and proved his mother’s love was not unconditional.

Grey, who loved men and women, tentatively calls himself a “closeted bisexual” but language comes up short: “I never really thought that any of the names were exactly right for me,” he said.

A complex portrait emerges of Grey in black and white. He reveals he’s had a nose job, slept with a stripper, fought with legendary director Bob Fosse and once lugged his dirty laundry on a plane.

“I’m not that good. I’m just like the rest of you,” he said. “Maybe worse.”

Colin Dickerman, the editorial director of the Macmillan division Flatiron Books, which published the 230-page book, said it’s not a tell-all or a collection of funny stories, but an attempt to explore the roots of the man behind some beloved characters.

“He wanted to be as honest as he could be and I think the book really reflects that,” said Dickerman. “It really goes into some personal places and I think does so remaining incredibly respectful to everyone in his life.”

Grey’s story also mirrors the evolution of American entertainment, from vaudeville to nightclubs to Broadway and Hollywood, weaving both his personal and professional lives. It reaches a peak in 1985 when Grey started thinking about coming out while starring in the AIDS play “The Normal Heart.”

The book was written over 2 1/2 years with the help of Rebecca Paley and Grey consulted with his brother and his daughter — “Dirty Dancing” star Jennifer Grey — on parts of the manuscript. He said he was inspired, in part, by reading Andre Agassi’s very honest 2010 memoir “Open: An Autobiography.”

“I didn’t see that I could tell the story of my career and not my life because they were so intertwined. And I also saw myself as maybe an example and maybe, in some small way, helping one person,” he said. “I like that idea.”

Grey writes that he was attracted to boys as early as 8 — one of his first crushes was a 16-year-old bellboy — but being openly gay wasn’t an option. Physical violence and closed doors would have been his life.

“The price was very high,” he said. “There would be no career. Look how long it’s even taken for there to be a few out gay people. In the last 10 years, maybe. The last five, maybe.”

His embrace of his sexuality was also complicated by the fact that he desperately wanted to be a father. “It was something I was meant to do along with acting. However, it was a strange time,” he said. “Now gay people are having babies all over the place.”

Grey has since forgiven his mother, restored cordial relations with his ex-wife and is next focusing on his fifth book of photographs. The parts of his life that were volatile and complicated have gone.

“It seems to have all very much quieted down,” he said with a wry smile. 

How do companies prey on your weaknesses? | A Q&A with the author of ‘Phishing for Phools’

It’s no secret we do things we know we shouldn’t. We overeat, gamble away our savings and live like tomorrow will never come. One reason, two Nobel laureates argue, is that there are plenty of businesses happy to lead us astray.

Robert Shiller, an economist at Yale University, used his understanding of how human behavior can affect markets to predict the dot-com crash of the early 2000s and the housing collapse of 2007. He won the Nobel Prize for Economics in 2013 for his work showing that stock and bond prices can move out of step with economic fundamentals even over the long run.

In his new book with George Akerlof, another Nobel-prize winning economist, Shiller examines the many ways credit-card companies, financial firms and other businesses lure people into buying things that might harm them. The authors call that phishing, adopting the word for a common email scam to a broad array of cynical business practices. They call the person who takes the bait a phool. Their book is called “Phishing for Phools: The Economics of Manipulation and Deception.”

Their big point: It’s not that bad actors are gaming the free market, it’s that hucksters and dishonest marketing are part of the free-market game.

In a recent interview with The Associated Press, Shiller talked about how phishers lure phools, the appeal of one-armed bandits and the media’s misleading fascination with splashy stories. The interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Q: What prompted you to write this book?

A: I often tend to think that things are not what they seem.

Q: Your focus isn’t on malevolent fraudsters but people just doing their job?

A: We agreed that we shouldn’t portray these people as evil. This is just what you get with free markets, depending on how free you let them be. My previous books were all about the positive aspects to markets. But markets are often presented too positively, with a certain reverence. Life is more complicated than that.

Q: Could you explain why you chose the word, phish?

A: We use it as a metaphor because people are aware of computer phishing. You can so easily be fooled by them because you don’t see all the work that went into luring you in. Things look perfectly plain and simple but in fact it’s all artifice. There are a lot of these phishers, some of them are savvy operators, and they’re experimenting. They find a ploy and, man, it works.

Q: This isn’t a new trend but it’s getting worse?

A: Yes. Take the slot machine. In the 19th Century, it dispensed sweets and toys. It was the first vending machine. Now, it’s optimized for gambling. Companies experiment with different things. There’s the jingling and bright lights, all part of a mesmerizing effect. They like to give you the sense that you’ve almost won, with three cherries, for instance. You can program it so that two cherries come up, and you can see the third cherry stopping just one off. You think, “I almost won!”

I don’t actually play these machines, mind you.

Q: The gist is that businesses keep casting new lures into the water until they get a bite?

A: It’s the same thing with Cinnabon. They don’t publicize the experimentation they do. Manufacturers of food try to get the optimal ratio to tap into your impulsivity. They don’t care about your health. Cinnabon boasts about their genuine Makara cinnamon from Indonesia. They can boast about that sort of thing. They can’t say, “Boy, we really cranked up the fat and sugar.”

They place them carefully indoors, in train stations and airports, where you’ll smell it. You’re frustrated, your flight was delayed, and you’re in a bad mood. They catch you right there. The mind tends to have a conversation, producing an excuse to eat it alongside a memory of your resolve not to eat it. They try to help one side of this conversation with the slogan, “Life needs frosting.” It’s a beautiful slogan, a great justification for giving in. It works, I bet.

Q: You say the news media is guilty of phishing, too. How so?

A: They often focus on things that aren’t important because they know what kind of story sells. In March of last year, this Malaysia Airlines plane went down mysteriously. The logical thing is to think somebody made a mistake. However, the news media latched onto a mystery story for days and days. It’s just a waste of time to think about. In terms of human welfare, it would be much better if the cable stations put up the periodic table of the elements to remind everybody. That would be useful information compared to the Malaysian airlines story.

I was on Neil Cavuto’s Fox Business TV show. He asked me what I thought about the Federal Reserve raising interest rates. I said I don’t think it really matters whether the Fed raises rates this meeting or next meeting. He said, “Look we’re doing a whole show about this.” There’s too much attention to these little stories.

Q: Do you see any speculative bubbles out there now?

A: There was a stock market bubble from 2009 to 2014. It might have ended last year. People have been worried about valuations in the market recently. The problem is there’s no exact science. We don’t know the probabilities of future events. Still, you have to take action and so you do it on gut feeling. That’s the world we live in. There’s so much disagreement about investing, and it’s because nobody really knows.