Tag Archives: 350.org

United Resistance: Progressive groups launch protest as confirmation hearings take place

More than 50 progressive organizations sent a message of united resistance to Donald Trump’s administration as the U.S. Senate began confirmation hearings on Capitol Hill.

Movement leaders, including NAACP president Cornell Brooks, Greenpeace USA executive director Annie Leonard and SEIU International president Mary Kay Henry pledged to defend against threats to civil rights, immigrant rights, women’s reproductive rights, social equality, action on climate change, public health and safety, public dissent and access to information.

In the United Resistance campaign, groups are pledging to work together across issues. More than 50 organizations have signed onto the pledge.

United Resistance campaigners

Advancement Project (National), Asian Pacific Environmental Network, Brave New Films, Center for Biological Diversity, Climate Justice Alliance, Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles, Color Of Change, Common Cause, Communications Workers of America, Daily Kos, Democracy Initiative, Demos, Ella Baker Center for Human Rights, Every Voice, Food & Water Action Fund, Forward Together, Free Press, Friends of the Earth, Grassroots Global Justice Alliance, Green For All, Greenpeace, Inc, Indigenous Environmental Network, Jewish Voice for Peace, Jobs With Justice, Labor Network for Sustainability, MoveOn.org, NAACP, NARAL, National Domestic Workers Alliance, National LGBTQ Task Force Action Fund, National Network for Arab American Communities, Oakland Institute, Oil Change International, OneAmerica, One Billion Rising, Our Revolution, People’s Action, People For the American Way, Planned Parenthood Action Fund, Public Citizen, Rainforest Action Network, Restaurant Opportunities Centers (ROC) United, RootsAction.org, Sierra Club, The Story of Stuff Project, United We Dream, Working Families Party, World Beyond War, V-Day, 350.org.

For the record

With just over a week before Inauguration Day and the Senate hearings underway on Donald Trump’s choices for top posts, leaders of progressive organizers are speaking out on threats posed by the incoming administration and vowing resistance.

“Trump is not on the side of the American people. After promises of “draining the swamp, his cabinet is now full of more billionaire lobbyists and executives than any administration in history. This president will never know what it feels like to worry about the water his family is drinking, to wonder if his house will survive the next superstorm, or if his child will face hateful bullying at school. It is up to each one of us to protect each other, to fight for each other, and to resist the ways in which Donald Trump threatens America.” — Greenpeace USA executive director Annie Leonard

 

“Our movement to advance the fundamental values of justice and democracy, for the empowerment of immigrant and refugee communities, for Muslims and other religious minorities in the United States is ready to protect our families, to assert our presence, and to challenge our nation to live up to its values as a nation built by immigration.  I’m heartened by the energy to resist in our own communities, and by the broad coalition of movements coming together to stand and defend each other, whatever the Trump Administration throws at us.  At stake is a vision for our nation and world grounded in racial and social justice, committed to improving the lives of every American, and realizing a healthy and diverse future where everyone can thrive.  We stand with our sisters and brothers in the intersections of racial, economic and climate justice.” — Rich Stolz, executive director, OneAmerica

 

“Solidarity forever must include solidarity now — intensive, sustained and determined to defend past gains as well as make future ones possible. Everything that we hold dear is at stake.” — Norman Solomon, coordinator, RootsAction.org

 

“Green For All stands against Trump’s effort to auction off our air, water and climate to the highest bidder. We resist efforts to prioritize profit over human life and stand with frontline communities, those in small towns and urban areas who face the brunt of pollution, to fight for climate solutions that put them first. We will fight alongside the underdogs, those most ignored, to ensure that their voices are heard because we all deserve clean air, clean water and a healthy environment to raise our kids.” — Vien Truong, director of Green For All 

 

“The corporate cartel that works to wage wars, pollute the planet, concentrate the wealth, and restrict the rights of dissenters finds a way to all work together. Those of us seeking a better world — a sustainable world at all — must work together to resist the path the U.S. government is on and to project and push forward a better one. Our collective numbers give us power, and our interlocking issues give us a persuasive alternative. Shifting military spending to human and environmental needs makes a world beyond our dreams perfectly achievable.”  — David Swanson, director of World Beyond War

 

“The Sierra Club’s mission is to protect both the natural and the human environment. That is why we stand in solidarity with organizations fighting for a fair and safe America that protects everyone. We stand with workers and working families, for women’s rights and LGBTQ rights, with people of all faiths and backgrounds, for public health and economic fairness, and on the side of racial justice and immigrant families. To change everything it takes everyone, and that’s exactly why we’re going to stand up together over the next four years and fight to protect the people and places that we love.” — Michael Brune, Sierra Club executive director 

 

“Trump’s presidency represents an existential threat to an open internet and an adversarial press. Based on its appointments and actions so far, the Trump administration appears committed to undermining everyone’s rights to connect and communicate. We’re dedicated to fighting Trump’s agenda on media and technology while supporting the resistance efforts of groups doing important work elsewhere. Trump has named numerous people to his administration and transition team with long histories of support for dangerous and often racist policies and actions. Many others have openly campaigned to gut essential public safeguards in every area from worker safety to the environment to telecommunications. All must be resisted from day one.” — Free Press CEO and president Craig Aaron

 

“The Trump administration promises to roll back our environmental laws, gut civil rights protections, and enrich the pockets of Wall Street at the expense of everyone else. We can’t let this happen—and together, we can resist the worst effects of his presidency. We’ll keep the pressure on our elected officials to represent the majority of Americans that want safe food, clean water, a stable climate, and a democracy that works for all of us.” — Wenonah Hauter, executive director of Food & Water Action Fund

 

“As the chief law enforcement officer, the attorney generally has far-reaching decision making power over issues that impact every person in the U.S. If appointed, Jeff Sessions will be the final decision maker on if the FBI can profile Muslim members of our community, whether or not to sanction stop and frisk policies, oversight of our prisons, the Department of Justice and drug enforcement. He has a track record of disregarding civil rights, denying racism, and promoting a radical agenda that would undo many of the laws that have given voice to communities of color historically shut out of our democracy. His values don’t reflect an America where all people can thrive and we are united in opposition to his nomination.” —  Kalpana Krishnamurthy, policy Director at Forward Together, a national advocacy organization.

“The blueprint for failure is division and ambivalence in the wake of a united conservative agenda that is intentionally undermining our democracy and threatening our communities. Our power to resist and reclaim our democracy is rooted in our shared commitment to dismantling interwoven systems of oppression. We are putting the new administration on notice: every day of the next four years, be prepared to confront powerful organized communities who refuse to be silenced.” — Judith Browne Dianis, executive director of Advancement Project’s national office

“At Rainforest Action Network, we stand for people and planet. But today, we need to stand firmly in opposition to a systemic assault on our values from the incoming administration. We are pledging to oppose those who would deny science and deny climate change. We are pledging to oppose those who would gut environmental protections in the name of corporate profits. We are pledging to stand for civil rights, to stand for human and labor rights, and to stand with those directly impacted by global forest destruction and climate change.” — Lindsey Allen, executive director, Rainforest Action Network

 

“We have witnessed one of the most contentious and emotional political races in our country’s history. What we have learned is that, now, more than ever, we need to come together to uphold our shared values of freedom and equality for all. Arab and Muslim Americans have long dealt with xenophobia, Islamophobia, racism and bigotry. Throughout the presidential election, we were faced with many unprecedented obstacles, and yet we persevered and remained committed to improving and empowering our communities. We know we must maintain our spirit of advocacy and become stronger leaders for a more hopeful future.” — Nadia El-Zein Tonova, director of the National Network for Arab American Communities 

 

“America is great when it becomes more inclusive, more democratic and more just. The Trump administration threatens these values, and democracy itself. Against this threat, We the People will protect our democracy and the values we most cherish by exercising our democratic rights. We will stand together to reject efforts to denigrate, injure or exclude Muslim Americans, immigrants or any other targeted community. We will reject Trumpism and assert the central importance of love and solidarity, kindness and decency to who we are a country and a people.” — Robert Weissman, president of Public Citizen

 

“Donald Trump is a dangerous narcissist. We need to block his agenda of greed and division, and and we need to stand together to do it. That’s the only hope for building a nation that works for all of us.” — Dan Cantor, national director, Working Families Party:

 

“Trump’s presidency threatens immigrants, African Americans, Muslims, workers, women, children, the elderly, the disabled, LGBTQ people, and many others. Indeed, it threatens all that holds us together as a society. We the people — society — need to defend ourselves against this threat and bring it to an end. Resisters to repressive regimes elsewhere have called such resistance to tyranny “Social Self-Defense.” The struggle to protect our people and planet against the Trump agenda requires such a strategy. Therefore we are proud to join the United Resistance Campaign as a form of Social Self Defense.” — Michael Leon Guerrero, Labor Network for Sustainability 

 

“If Trump thinks this wave of opposition and resistance will burn out quickly and die, he’s dead wrong. We’ll be there every day, every week and every year to oppose every policy that hurts wildlife; poisons our air or water; destroys the climate; promotes racism, misogyny or homophobia; and marginalizes entire segments of our society.” — Kieran Suckling, executive director of the Center for Biological Diversity

 

“We live in a global world where our lives are intertwined. An act of hate against one is an act of hate against all. So we stand here united with all voices of peace, tolerance, racial equity, and justice. We gain our unity from the diversity of our religions, of our sexual preferences, women’s rights, and of our racial diversity. We allege to speak for all who are voiceless, marginalized, and criminalized. We are one force, united together for the betterment of humanity.” — Anuradha Mittal, Oakland Institute executive director 

 

“It’s time to get back to the basics: everyday people with a plan, through everyday acts of courage, will eventually make history.” — Ai-jen Poo, director, National Domestic Workers Alliance

On the web

Spread the resistance, join the resistance.

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No boundaries in Break Free climate change campaign

Activists in May put their bodies on the line — across railroad tracks, in front of power plants and at the bottom of mining pits — to demand that the world “break free” from fossil fuels.

“The global climate justice movement is rising fast,” said environmental activist and author Naomi Klein. “But so are the oceans. So are global temperatures. This is a race against time. Our movement is stronger than ever, but to beat the odds, we have to grow stronger.”

The Break Free campaign lasted 12 days, with actions on six continents.

“There’s never been a bigger, more concerted wave of actions against the plans of the fossil fuel industry to overheat our Earth,” said Bill McKibben, co-founder of the 350.org environmental group. “In the hottest year on record, we’re determined to turn up the political heat on the planet’s worst polluters.”

Environmental activists stopped the open cast coal mine Ffos-y-Fran near Merthyr Tydfil, Wales from operating. The activists from Reclaim the Power wants to shut down the mine and a moratorium on all future open coal mining in Wales. Open coal mining is hugely damaging to the environment and  contributing to global climate change. — PHOTO: Break Free 2016
Environmental activists stopped the open cast coal mine Ffos-y-Fran near Merthyr Tydfil, Wales from operating. The activists from Reclaim the Power wants to shut down the mine and a moratorium on all future open coal mining in Wales. Open coal mining is hugely damaging to the environment and contributing to global climate change. — PHOTO: Kristian Buus/Break Free 2016

Protesters targeted some of the world’s most dangerous fossil fuel projects in civil disobedience actions, including:

United States: Demonstrators marched in Chicago to protest new tar sands projects in the Midwest. In other actions, protesters targeted fracking in Denver; “bomb trains” in New York state; refinery pollution in Seattle; and drilling off the Arctic, Atlantic, Gulf and Pacific coasts.

Australia: On May 8, thousands of demonstrators gathered in Newcastle at the largest coal port in the world, shutting down operations for hours and making clear that climate change will be an issue in the election of the next prime minister.

Brazil: Activists rallied for a ban on fracking May 6 and marched on a coal power plant in Pecem, Ceara, May 14.

Canada: On May 14, activists demonstrated on land and on water against the proposed Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain tar sands pipeline.

• Germany: Activists demonstrated May 14 in the Lusatia region against one of Europe’s largest open-pit lignite mines.

Indonesia: Thousands assembled outside the presidential palace May 11 to resist coal projects and demand the government move from a reliance on coal to embrace renewable energy.

Nigeria: Demonstrators on the Atlantic coast protested against Exxon’s offshore wells, which frequently leak, impacting fisheries and polluting the coastline.

Philippines: Thousands of people marched in Batangas City, where JG Summit Holdings wants to build a coal-fired power plant, just one of 28 proposed in the Philippines.

South Africa: Demonstrators gathered May 12 in Emalahleni, one of the most polluted towns in the world, to speak out on the effects of climate change.

Turkey: A mass action in Aliaga May 15 focused on a coal waste site plan for four fossil fuel projects in the area.

United Kingdom: The Reclaim the Power network brought together demonstrators at the U.K.’s largest opencast coal mine in South Wales. Earlier this spring, the Welsh Assembly voted for a moratorium on opencast coal mining.

Break free, day-to-day

Break Free was a mass movement held in May, with protesters demonstrating around the world against continued reliance on fossil fuels.

Following are some ideas on how to break free of fossil fuels so that future generations might be born free from reliance on them:

• Conserve energy by turning off lights and replacing bulbs with longer-lasting fluorescent bulbs, running the air-conditioner less and using Energy Star appliances.

• Recycle. About 75 percent of U.S. waste is recyclable and can be donated instead of trashed. Even threadbare clothing can be donated — for re-use as rags, mattress filling and other purposes.

• Avoid non-biodegradable products. Single-use foam cups and trays biodegrade very slowly and the styrene they’re made of is a possible carcinogen. Plastic grocery bags are made from petrochemicals and also biodegrade very slowly.

• Live green. Consume only food and energy needed to survive, promote renewable and clean energy services and walk more than drive.

— L.N.

 

PHOTO: Break Free 2016  On May 8 in Australia, more than 2,000 people shut down the world’s largest coal port. For six hours, no coal went in or out of the Port of Newcastle. Sixty people blocked the only coal transport train line into the port. Also, hundreds of kayakers blocked the harbor’s entrance to any entering or exiting coal ships. 
On May 8 in Australia, more than 2,000 people shut down the world’s largest coal port. For six hours, no coal went in or out of the Port of Newcastle. Sixty people blocked the only coal transport train line into the port. Also, hundreds of kayakers blocked the harbor’s entrance to any entering or exiting coal ships. — PHOTO: Break Free 2016

 

 

Signing the Paris agreement: next nail in the coffin

The formal signing of the Paris Agreement on April 22 could be the next nail in the coffin of the fossil fuel industry if governments actually follow through on their commitments.

The growing and vibrant climate movement is forcing governments to bow to the pressure to break free from fossil fuels.

However, there is still a dangerous gap between what the governments are signing up to, what they are doing and the real ambition we need to avert the worst impacts of climate change.

The only way to achieve this is by keeping coal, oil and gas in the ground. As a movement we will continue to hold governments accountable, ensure they ratify the treaty, go well beyond their current targets and accelerate the transition to 100 percent renewable energy.

We also need to maximize the current political momentum to push for more. Break Free, a wave of global mobilization planned for this May, is at the forefront of this and marks an unprecedented moment of local and international groups undertaking bold mobilizations to stop fossil fuel projects on six continents; demonstrating their resolve to transition off fossil fuels and build the new kind of economy that we know is possible – centered on a just transition to 100 percent renewable energy systems.

The fossil fuel industry is pushing our climate to the brink faster than anyone expected, as record temperatures are proving, along with extreme weather related events.

We are all at risk from a warming planet, so we are left with no choice but to scale up nonviolent direct action. As the transition from dirty energy to clean and efficient energy systems grows stronger and faster, communities and private citizens around the world will continue to hold decision makers accountable to their promises, and to science.

About the author

May Boeve is executive director of 350.org, “the red line for human beings, the most important number on the planet. The most recent science tells us that unless we can reduce the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to 350 parts per million, we will cause huge and irreversible damage to the earth. But solutions exist. All around the world, a movement is building to take on the climate crisis, to get humanity out of the danger zone and below 350. This movement is massive, it is diverse, and it is visionary. We are activists, scholars, and scientists. We are leaders in our businesses, our churches, our governments, and our schools. We are clean energy advocates, forward-thinking politicians, and fearless revolutionaries. And we are united around the world, driven to make our planet livable for all who come after us.”

Spring push for fossil fuels divestment launched on campuses

Students with Swarthmore Mountain Justice took action outside board member Rhonda Cohen’s off-campus office this week, calling on her to recuse herself from future conversations on fossil fuel divestment due to her personal financial ties to the fossil fuel industry.

The demonstration marked the launch of a two-month series of nonviolent direct actions on colleges and universities.

“We refuse to stand idly by as Swarthmore continues to align itself with an industry that is incompatible with our future,” said Sophia Zaia, a sophomore and divestment organizer with Swarthmore Mountain Justice. “Board members can’t make objective decisions on divestment when they have a personal financial stake in the future success of the fossil fuel industry. We have no choice but to escalate to ensure that the conversation on divestment, an issue that leaves us without a moment to lose, is transparent and free from compromising conflicts of interest.”

Students across the country are taking action this spring, calling out links to the fossil fuel industry on their boards and demanding divestment in a campaign sponsored by 350.org.

“We know that change will only come when we take the lead and push our institutions to stand on the right side of history,” said Julia Berkman-Hill, a divestment campaigner and leader with Bowdoin Climate Action. “As long as Bowdoin refuses to move forward on divestment, we will continue to use our voices to show that we do not consent to the College’s relationship to this industry’s inherently destructive business model. Our schools betray us when they invest in the exploitation and deception that the likes of Exxon and Big Oil perpetuate.”

Reports from InsideClimate News and the Los Angeles Times revealed that Exxon knew about climate change since the 1970s but poured extensive resources into discrediting its own research and sowing doubt and confusion among the public and world governments.

Exxon is currently being probed by the criminal branch of the FBI and four Attorneys General have launched investigations into the corporation’s alleged climate crimes. Also, 20 Attorneys General have launched a coalition to hold the fossil fuel industry accountable for their decades of deep deception, according to 350.org.

“Around the world, those who have done the least to contribute bear the brunt of the worst effects of climate change. From Pakistan and the Philippines, to New Orleans and New York, climate change threatens the lives of frontline communities every day by actively making our planet uninhabitable,” said Sarah Jacqz, an organizer with Divest UMass. “Any action on climate is undermined if our institutions continue to invest in this violent industry.It is high time that our institutions do everything in their power to tackle the climate crisis — that starts with divesting from fossil fuels.”

To date, more than 500 institutions representing more than $3.4 trillion in assets under management have committed to some level of fossil fuel divestment.

For the student activists involved in the divestment campaign, personal ties to the fossil fuel industry among their school’s decision-makers pose disturbing conflicts of interest.

“We have made our choice clear, and we choose to stand on the side of a just and stable future,” said Zaia. “Now, we’re demanding that our institutions of higher learning stand with us and make a choice: the future of a destructive, outdated and rogue industry or the future of your students?”

 

TransCanada sues United States over KXL rejection, wants $15 billion

TransCanada Corp. on Jan. 7 sued the United States seeking $15 billion in compensation after the Obama administration rejected its request for a permit for the Keystone XL pipeline.

“TransCanada was wrong to try to ram the dirty tar sands pipeline down our throats — and it’s wrong to try to force American taxpayers to pony up for its mistakes,” said Anthony Swift, director of the National Resources Defense Council’s Canada project. “This is about a foreign company trying to undercut safeguards that protect the American people. Its attempt to bully us deserves to be rejected.”

Jason Kowalski, policy director for 350.org, one of the environmental groups that led the effort against the pipeline, added, “This won’t actually help build the pipeline, too late for that. It’s just a greedy and desperate move by TransCanada to try and salvage some of the money they wasted on this ridiculous boondoggle.”

The company alleged Barack Obama exceeded his constitutional authority in denying the pipeline, claiming the president’s denial of the pipeline permit was a symbolic gesture to show his support for action against climate change.

TransCanada also is using a provision in the North American Free Trade Agreement to sue the United States. The provision — the investor-state dispute settlement — gives corporations the power to sue governments for decisions taken in the broader public interest.

Kowalski said the lawsuit “is a reminder that we shouldn’t be signing new trade agreements like the Trans Pacific Partnership that allow corporations to sue governments that try and keep fossil fuels in the ground.”

UN report: Global warming is here and dangerous

Global warming is here, human-caused and dangerous — and it’s increasingly likely that the heating trend could be irreversible, a draft of a new international science report says.

The United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change this week sent governments a final draft of its synthesis report, which combines three earlier, gigantic documents by the Nobel Prize-winning group. There is little in the report that wasn’t in the other more-detailed versions, but the language is more stark and the report attempts to connect the different scientific disciplines studying problems caused by the burning of fossil fuels, such as coal, oil and gas.

The 127-page draft, obtained by The Associated Press, paints a harsh warning of what’s causing global warming and what it will do to humans and the environment. It also describes what can be done about it.

“Continued emission of greenhouse gases will cause further warming and long-lasting changes in all components of the climate system, increasing the likelihood of severe, pervasive and irreversible impacts for people and ecosystems,” the report says. The final report will be issued after governments and scientists go over the draft line by line in an October conference in Copenhagen.

Depending on circumstances and values, “currently observed impacts might already be considered dangerous,” the report says. It mentions extreme weather and rising sea levels, such as heat waves, flooding and droughts. It even raises, as an earlier report did, the idea that climate change will worsen violent conflicts and refugee problems and could hinder efforts to grow more food. And ocean acidification, which comes from the added carbon absorbed by oceans, will harm marine life, it says.

Without changes in greenhouse gas emissions, “climate change risks are likely to be high or very high by the end of the 21st century,” the report says.

In 2009, countries across the globe set a goal of limiting global warming to about another 2 degrees Fahrenheit above current levels. But the report says that it is looking more likely that the world will shoot past that point. Limiting warming to that much is possible but would require dramatic and immediate cuts in carbon dioxide pollution.

The report says if the world continues to spew greenhouse gases at its accelerating rate, it’s likely that by mid-century temperatures will increase by about another 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit (2 degrees Celsius) compared to temperatures from 1986 to 2005. And by the end of the century, that scenario will bring temperatures that are about 6.7 degrees warmer (3.7 degrees Celsius).

“The report tells us once again what we know with a greater degree of certainty: that climate change is real, it is caused by us, and it is already causing substantial damage to us and our environment,” Pennsylvania State University climate scientist Michael Mann wrote in an email. “If there is one take home point of this report it is this: We have to act now.”

John Christy of the University of Alabama, Huntsville, is in the tiny minority of scientists who are skeptical of mainstream science’s claim that global warming is a major problem. He says people will do OK: “Humans are clever. We shall adapt to whatever happens.”

While projections show that the world will warm and climate will change, there’s still a level of uncertainty about how much, and that makes the problem all about how much risk we accept, said MIT climate scientist Kerry Emanuel.

If it’s soon and only a little risk, he said, that’s not too bad, but when you look at the risk curve the other end of it is “very frightening.”

The report used the word “risk” 351 times in just 127 pages.

On the Web …

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change:http://www.ipcc.ch/

Green groups take aim at Maryland liquefied natural gas project

Leaders of more than a dozen green groups are calling on President Barack Obama to revisit proposals to expand U.S. exports of fracked and liquefied natural gas, which the environmentalists say would significantly undermine his administration’s efforts to tackle the climate crisis.

A letter signed by representatives from 16 national and regional groups urges Obama to ensure a comprehensive federal environmental impact review for one of the most controversial liquefied natural gas export proposals before his administration — the Cove Point facility proposed by Dominion Resources just outside of Washington, D.C., on the Chesapeake Bay.

“President Obama, exporting LNG is simply a bad idea in almost every way. We again implore you to shift course on this disastrous push to frack, liquefy, and export this climate-wrecking fossil fuel,” the letter states.

“As a first step, tell [the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission] to drop its shameful and unacceptably weak permitting process for Cove Point in Maryland. Demand a full Environmental Impact Statement for this massive $3.8 billion project just a short drive from your house. An EIS will put more facts on the table and, we believe, will persuade you and the nation that a pell-mell rush to export gas is a pell-mell rush to global climate ruin,” the letter continues.

Groups signing the letter included 350.org, CREDO, Food & Water Watch, the Center for Biological Diversity, Friends of the Earth and Earthworks, all sponsors of a weekend rally in California that was the largest anti-fracking protest in the state’s history, as well as the Sierra Club, the Energy Action Coalition and Earthjustice.

National leaders Bill McKibben and Michael Brune joined a tele-press conference to release the letter.

“From Maryland to California, Americans are taking to the streets to say that climate leaders don’t frack,” said McKibben, co-founder and president of 350.org, the organization at the forefront of the campaign against the Keystone XL pipeline.

Emerging and credible analyses show that significant expansion of fracking and gas export infrastructure could cripple global efforts to solve climate change, which Secretary of State John Kerry recently called perhaps the “the world’s most fearsome weapon of mass destruction.” In fact, the lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions of the LNG export process — including drilling, piping, compressing, liquefying, shipping, re-gasifying and burning — likely make it as harmful to the climate, or worse than, burning coal overseas.

Analysis shows the $3.8 billion Cove Point plan could alone trigger more lifecycle climate change pollution than all seven of Maryland’s existing coal-fired power plants combined.

“President Obama has told us many times that failure to address the climate crisis amounts to the betrayal of our children and future generations, so it would be contradictory for the president to allow the LNG export facility at Cove Point to start operating without a full environmental review,” said Brune. “We can’t cut climate pollution and simultaneously expand the use of dirty fossil fuels, and we must fully understand the consequences of liquefying fracked natural gas for export. Building new fossil fuel infrastructure keeps America tied to the past. We should be exporting clean energy innovation, not the dirty fuels of the 19th century.”

The Cove Point project has faced particularly fierce regional and local resistance in recent months, including a record-large environmental protest in downtown Baltimore in late February and a string of three civil disobedience protests over the past three weeks resulting in arrests across Maryland.

Cove Point would be the first export facility to open fracking operations across the Marcellus Shale to Asian export markets. It also would be built in an area in southern Maryland that is by far the most densely populated human community in the vicinity of any proposed gas export facility in the nation.

Despite calls from Maryland health, environmental and community leaders as well as Maryland’s attorney general for a full Environmental Impact Statement on Cove Point, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission announced last week that it would release a more limited and less participatory Environmental Assessment on May 15 of this year.