Women’s rights supporters to march on Washington after Donald Trump’s inauguration

Louis Weisberg, Staff writer

Police in Washington have issued a permit for a demonstration by women’s rights supporters on the day after President-elect Donald Trump’s inauguration.

The Washington Metropolitan Police Department issued the permit for the Jan. 21 Women’s March on Washington. Police are expecting 200,000 participants.

The event will start near the U.S. Capitol and march along Independence Avenue before dispersing at Constitution Avenue near the Washington Monument.

Roundtrip bus rides to and from the event are available in cities throughout the nation. Rides from Milwaukee to the Washington march are sold out but, as of press time, seats were still available on coaches departing from Madison, Green Bay, Stevens Point and Eau Claire.

Solidarity marches also will take place, including in Milwaukee and Madison.

“In solidarity with the Women’s March taking place in Washington, D.C., we will march peacefully in Madison. … We are coming together to demonstrate our support for the community members who have been marginalized by the recent U.S. election,” said a statement on the Women’s March on Washington’s official Wisconsin Facebook page.

Women’s March on Chicago

The largest solidarity march in the Midwest likely will take place in Chicago.

In a news release issued by the ACLU, march organizer Liz Radford said, “We are marching to voice protests and concerns because our rights, safety and values are at stake. The mission of this march is to connect, protect and activate in our communities. … We are varied races, ethnicities, ages, religions, sexual identities, economic situations, politics and countless other diversities, and we will share space on Jan. 21 to protect our rights and our humanity.”

The ACLU reported that on Dec. 22 organizers received conditional approval from the Chicago Park District to convene at 10 a.m. at Petrillo Bandshell in Grant Park.

“We are actively spreading the word throughout Chicago and the suburbs to recruit marchers and supporters,” said organizer Lisa DeSantiago. “We are here for equality and justice — everybody in this group wants it and will fight for it.”

The grassroots effort started in mid-November 2016 when several women met online and felt compelled to combat the divisive rhetoric of the presidential campaign.

In five weeks, more than 22,000 interested marchers connected online.

Nearly 10,000 people registered with the official Facebook page of the event within 48 hours of the effort’s launch.

Get involved

For more information about the Women’s March on Washington, go to womensmarch.com.

For more on the Women’s March on Madison, go to facebook.com/events/361478110866299.

For more about the Women’s March on Chicago, go to womens121marchonchicago.org, or facebook.com/womensmarchonchicago.