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Cindy McCain reverses stand on 'don't ask'

After appearing in an ad for the NOH8 campaign, Cindy McCain has apparently had a change of heart.

In the ad, she blasted the military’s “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy, which bans open gays and lesbians from serving. But two days later, she tweeted that she supports her husband Sen. John McCain in backing the policy.

John McCain also once said he wanted to overturn the ban on gays in the military. But he reversed his position after being challenged from the right in a political primary earlier this year. Now he’s one of Congress’ strongest defenders of the policy. Less than a month ago, he vowed to filibuster any attempt to eliminate it.

In the Nov. 10 ad, Cindy McCain said, "Our political and religious leaders tell LGBT youth that they have no future." Later in the ad, she said, "They can't serve our country openly."

Surrounding McCain in the ad were statements by a number of celebrities characterizing DADT as discriminatory and harmful to LGBT youth.

It was not McCain’s first pro-equality appearance. In January, she was photographed with tape over her mouth as part of the NOH8 campaign.

On Nov. 12, however, Cindy McCain tweeted, "I fully support the NOH8 campaign and all it stands for and am proud to be a part of it. But I stand by my husband's stance on DADT."

The McCains’ daughter Meghan McCain has been vocal in opposing the Republican Party’s opposition to LGBT equality.

The conflict between the McCains over DADT could be an indication that problems in their marriage are heading into the public arena. According to Washington insiders, the couple has been married in name only for years.

Cindy McCain developed an addiction to prescription drugs in the early 1990s and was accused of obtaining them illegally through the American Voluntary Medical Team, a charity she founded. Through a plea bargain she made with federal authorities, no charges were filed.

 

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