Tag Archives: clothing

Rock band fighting for sea turtles with clothing line

Mexican rock band Mana is expanding its fight to save endangered sea turtles with a clothing line.

The band, known for its environmental activism, is stepping into the fashion industry with Ritos del Sol, a line of ecofriendly jeans and T-shirts for men and women.

A percentage of each sale will be donated to the group’s Selva Negra Foundation, the nonprofit it created in 1995 to raise awareness and take real action to save endangered species and help underserved communities around the world. It offers four lines — Selva Negra, Cosmos, Laberinto de Concreto and Inframundo — with designs that go from abstract prints inspired in flora and fauna to skulls and a skeleton’s ribs.

The musicians said the idea was presented to them a couple years ago by the designers at a Puebla, Mexico clothing factory owned by a cousin of vocalist Fher.

“The clothing that he makes uses 25 percent of the water that the factories normally use in Mexico,” Fher said. “They are also good to their employees, it’s fair trade, and they work in indigenous communities not only in Puebla but in Oaxaca.”

Drummer Alex Gonzalez said band members weren’t initially convinced because “it’s not that easy to launch a clothing line and we have seen other bands and other artists (doing it) and some of them have done well, other not so much.

“But more than a business for the band, we wanted for it to be a positive idea and proposal so that when people would buy the clothes they would know that they are doing something beneficial for the environment,” he added. “So Fher came up with this idea of supporting the sea turtles that we have in Mexico.”

All four band members were involved in the designs of the T-shirts.

“At the end of the day, it had to be clothing that we wanted to use, both on and offstage,” Gonzalez said.

 

On the Web

https://ritosdelsol.com/

http://www.selvanegra.com.mx/

http://www.mana.com.mx/

The band, known for its environmental activism, is stepping into the fashion industry with Ritos del Sol, a line of ecofriendly jeans and T-shirts for men and women.
The band, known for its environmental activism, is stepping into the fashion industry with Ritos del Sol, a line of ecofriendly jeans and T-shirts for men and women.

Dolce & Gabbana faces celebrity boycott after anti-gay remarks

Celebrities are joining the boycott launched by Elton John after fashion designers Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana criticized same-sex parents and the use of in vitro fertilization in an Italian magazine, calling the resulting children “synthetic.”

Courtney Love, Ricky Martin, talk-show host Andy Cohen and “American Horror Story” creator Ryan Murphy are among those pledging to ditch their Dolce & Gabbana clothes and support the boycott.

“My D&G shirts are going in the bin — don’t want ANYONE to wear them,” tennis star Martina Navratilova posted on Twitter.

Murphy said not only will he personally cease to wear the brand, he won’t allow the characters in any of his shows to wear it, either.

Dolce & Gabbana has been popular on red carpets and TV and film screens for years.

Channing Tatum and David Oyelowo wore the brand’s tuxedoes to the Oscars. “The Theory of Everything” star Felicity Jones chose one of D&G’s gowns for the Critics’ Choice Awards. Mindy Kaling recently donned a colorful frock from the designers on her show, “The Mindy Project.” Taraji P. Henson, as Cookie Lyons, has also worn Dolce & Gabbana on the Fox hit “Empire.”

Blogger Perez Hilton, who runs a website about fashion and celebrity, thinks the designers’ comments could hurt their Hollywood relationships.

“If a stylist or a celebrity has a choice of a designer to wear right now, I don’t think anybody will be choosing Dolce & Gabbana,” he said. “Because they haven’t just offended gay people, they’ve offended people across the board.”

Most shoppers wouldn’t be in a financial position to boycott the designers. A man’s pullover sweater costs $1,100; a cocktail dress could top $6,000. 

The company also has faced criticism over its fashion advertisements, including one campaign that suggested a gang rape of a woman.

Martin blasted the designers on Twitter Sunday, saying their voices are too powerful to spread such hate.

“Wake up, its 2015,” he wrote. “Luv urselves guys.”

Dolce and Gabbana are both gay and were previously in a relationship with each other.

“To see two very successful gay men with a large platform use that to promote small-mindedness infuriates me,” Hilton said. “We should be promoting openness and acceptance.”

Year in Review: 2013’s key fashion moments

It was a year for pixie haircuts, chunky flat shoes, bangs on our first lady and bare skin … lots of it, on movie actresses and pop stars. Fashion always has its royalty, and this year, Kerry Washington was a queen.

For real royalty, we had Kate Middleton, making the rest of us mortals feel a little better by flashing her mommy tummy. If Kate made us feel good, Lululemon didn’t, when its chairman appeared to blame women’s own bodies for problems with those popular yoga pants.

A look back at these and other key fashion moments of 2013:

MICHELLE’S BANGS:

Nobody would call bangs a new trend, but when the first lady’s involved, things take on more significance. In fact, President Barack Obama actually called his wife Michelle’s new hairdo the most significant event of his second inauguration. Unveiled just in time for the festivities, the new hairdo made enough news to have its own (unofficial) Twitter account, FirstLady’sBangs, which issued alerts like “Just got a text from Hillary Clinton’s side-part.”

LESBIAN COUTURE:

The message was unmistakable: At the Karl Lagerfeld haute couture show in Paris, the designer sent not one, but two brides down the runway for the finale. The brides walked hand in hand in their feathery concoctions, a clear vote of support by the designer for France’s gay marriage law. The show came only nine days after hundreds of thousands of people marched in Paris in opposition to the law.

QUEEN OF THE RUNWAY, AIRWAVES AND EVERYWHERE ELSE:

By the time she appeared in a lovely Stella McCartney floral frock and high red leather pumps as a judge on “Project Runway,” it was clear: In the realm where Hollywood meets fashion, Kerry Washington is royalty. On her hit show, “Scandal,” playing professional fixer Olivia Pope, she was all professional Washington – Washington, D.C., that is – but on the red carpet, she was glamour personified. Case in point: that Marchesa gown she wore at the Emmys, all cream and white and flower appliques, fit for a queen.

KATE MAKES US FEEL GREAT:

Much has been said about the fashion sense of the Duchess of Cambridge, aka Kate Middleton, but in 2013, it was something a bit different that caught our eye. Peeking out under her blue-and-white polka dot dress as she emerged from the hospital post-childbirth was a pronounced “mommy tummy,” a normal development but something most celebrities keep under wraps, until their personal trainers have whipped them back into magazine-cover shape. Thanks, Kate!

LULULEMON, NOT SO MUCH:

Remember those popular yoga pants that had the unintended effect of being see-through? Well, turns out the ongoing fabric problems with those pants, including pilling, was YOUR fault. Or rather: the fault of YOUR THIGHS. Founder and chairman Chip Wilson of Lululemon Athletica noted in a TV interview that “Frankly, some women’s bodies just actually don’t work” for the pants, because of thighs rubbing against fabric. Now Wilson just actually won’t be working as chairman of Lululemon; the company announced his resignation from the post in December.

TAKING IT ALL OFF:

Gwyneth Paltrow was happy to show just how little cellulite she has when she appeared at the “Iron Man 3” premiere in a dress with sheer mesh panels on the sides, leaving little of her lower body and, er, posterior to the imagination. But we all nearly forgot about Gwyneth when we saw actress Jaimie Alexander at the “Thor” premiere, her black gown expanding the see-through effect to the midriff and upper regions. Let’s just say these actresses are saving money on underwear.

DESIGNER MOVES:

A Paris runway show full of mournful symbols – and lots of black – was designer Marc Jacobs’ somber goodbye to Louis Vuitton in October after 16 years in the influential post of creative director. Under Jacobs, who also has his own eponymous brand, Louis Vuitton became the most lucrative fashion house in the world, in part thanks to Jacobs’ creation of a ready-to-wear line. He was replaced by Nicolas Ghesquiere, formerly at Balenciaga.

TAKING DESIGNERS TO TASK:

Iman and Naomi Campbell are legendary supermodels, but this year they lent themselves to something different: promoting diversity on the runway, by calling out designers whose catwalks were almost completely white. The two women joined modeling agent Bethann Hardison in their Balance Diversity campaign. Explaining their purpose, Iman, now 58, said she was shocked to hear there were fewer black models on the runway than when she stopped modeling in 1989.

WE GOT THE PUNK:

Who knew that punk would become high fashion? That development seemed to crystallize in May, when the hallowed halls of The Metropolitan Museum of Art hosted a new Costume Institute exhibit, “Punk: Chaos to Culture,” celebrating a movement that embraced anarchy in the 1970s. “Despite its best intentions, punk has come to symbolize integrity and authenticity,” said curator Andrew Bolton.

THE FLAT SHOE, THE PIXIE CUT:

Think short! In shoe stores this year, you could see a trend toward flats, including a notable reinterpretation of those chunky Birkenstocks. The first ripple effect would be comfort, of course, but the changes are more profound, notes Virginia Smith, Vogue’s fashion market and accessories director: “Every woman wants a flat right now, and that has a big impact on fashion because it changes proportion.” Another trend: pixie hair, on everyone from Michelle Williams to Anne Hathaway to Jennifer Lawrence. “It will have an effect beyond celebrity and the runway,” Smith says. “A lot of these women are very influential.”

TRENDSETTER MILEY?

Speaking of influence, dare we call Miley Cyrus a trendsetter? She was already a trailblazer with her pixie cut from 2012, but hey, you probably were too busy watching the stuck-out tongue, teddy-bear leotard and nude bikini (which falls into the baring-it-all trend at the MTV Video Music Awards). Only weeks later, though, she was all elegance in sequined Marc Jacobs at the Night of Stars gala. Miley the fashion icon? Not by the standard definition. But heading into 2014 she was one of the most-watched people on the planet. “Blurred Lines,” indeed.