Television

Fox series ‘Empire’ challenges homophobia in the black community

Written by David Bauder,
AP Television writer
Sunday, 25 January 2015 14:40

Terrence Howard stars as the patriarch of a music empire in Fox’s ‘Empire,’ created by out gay director Lee Daniels, who’s best known for his films “Precious” and “Lee Daniels’ The Butler.” -PHOTO: Courtesy

The creator of Fox’s prime-time soap Empire said he wants to “blow the lid off homophobia” in the African-American community with a depiction of the show’s lead character’s hostile relationship with his gay son.

Discovery Network's new boss says no more man-eating snakes and mega-sharks

Written by The Associated Press Sunday, 11 January 2015 08:52

There’s a new boss in charge at the Discovery Network, and he’s anxious to get rid of mega-sharks, mermaids and man-eating snakes.

French lessons
'Little White Lies' and 'Farewell, My Queen' offer Gallic charms

Written by Gregg Shapiro,
Staff writer
Thursday, 21 March 2013 13:04

title

Before she lost her head for her country, Marie Antoinette (Diane Kruger) lost her head for Sidonie (Lea Seydoux), a lady-in-waiting who became the queen’s favorite reader in “Farewell, My Queen.” Spanning the first few tumultuous days of the French Revolution in July 1789 , the film opens with a shot illustrating the vast differences between the worlds outside of and within the walls of Versailles. As bread becomes scarce in Paris, the question becomes how safe is it for the king and queen and their staff of servants.

'Sunset Boulevard' still a camp classic

Written by Gregg Shapiro,
Contributing writer
Thursday, 21 February 2013 17:35

More than 60 years after Billy Wilder’s Oscar-winning “Sunset Boulevard” premiered, forgotten silent film star Norma Desmond (Gloria Swanson) remains one of cinemas most enduring characters. She’s been parodied by Carol Burnett and was the subject of an Andrew Lloyd Weber musical. Some of her most famous lines – “All right, Mr. DeMille, I’m ready for my close-up” ­– have become part of the gay lexicon.

Stevie Wonder, Dolly Parton, Eva Longoria projects part of NBC’s slate

Written by The AP Monday, 19 January 2015 11:22

Stevie Wonder is on board for an NBC miniseries set against the 19th-century Underground Railroad that helped escaped slaves find freedom.

Wonder, who will serve as executive producer for the project, also may be involved in a musical adaptation of the miniseries that is aimed at Broadway, NBC Entertainment Chairman Bob Greenblatt said.

2014 gave viewers great shows on-air and online

Written by FRAZIER MOORE,
AP Television Writer
Wednesday, 24 December 2014 10:11

From the extraordinary Maggie Gyllenhaal-starring miniseries “The Honorable Woman” on SundanceTV to Syfy’s goofy “Sharknado 2: The Second One,” TV delivered in 2014 — streaming, on cable and over the air.

Showtime’s “Homeland” roared back from last year’s muddle with a season of white-knuckle suspense. CBS’ “The Good Wife” killed off a main character to give the show its latest burst of life. FX’s “Sons of Anarchy” ended its seven-season run with explosive closure. HBO’s “Boardwalk Empire” wrapped its saga with a fascinating season that juggled three phases in the life of Atlantic City potentate Nucky Thompson.

'Gayby' and 'Where the Bears Are'

Written by Gregg Shapiro,
Contributing writer
Friday, 08 March 2013 16:56

Jenn (Jenn Harris), a straight, NYC yoga instructor and Matt (Matthew Wilkas), her gorgeous, geeky, gay, comic bookstore-employed BFF have been talking about having a baby together since they were in college. With romantic prospects looking bleak for both of them, they begin making plans for how to have a kid. Jenn prefers the old-fashioned way. And, since they have only officially – and disastrously – had sex once, while in college, they agree to give it a try. That, in a nutshell, is the premise of writer/director/actor Jonathan Lisecki’s funny and sweet rom-com “Gayby.”

'Jack & Diane' is a hopeless mess

Written by Gregg Shapiro,
Contributing writer
Monday, 11 February 2013 15:25

From the first time that we see her onscreen, we know there’s something not right about Diane (Juno Temple). Wandering the streets of Manhattan attempting to borrow the cell phones of passersby, she ends up in a shop where she meets young, butch Jack (Riley Keough), who takes her in.

Golden Globes reward TV pioneers, ordain Oscar-ready films

Written by Matthew Reddin,
staff writer
Monday, 12 January 2015 14:57
GoldenGlobes

Film moguls and stars would like you to think the Golden Globes are all about them, with television getting a seat at the table out of courtesy. Yet this year, the Hollywood Foreign Press Association’s annual awards gala proved what armchair critics have increasingly discovered over the past few years — it’s on TV networks that the boldest stories are being told.

Over and out: TV flops, exits and endings in 2014

Written by FRAZIER MOORE,
AP Television Writer
Tuesday, 23 December 2014 11:04

Along with its triumphs, the world of TV had its share of setbacks in 2014.  Here’s a sample:

• “How I Met Your Mother” Concludes: This long-running CBS sitcom met few viewers’ expectations for a slam-bang finish. Its big reveal — naming the titular “your mother” after nine years of teasing — yielded a finale only slightly less tangled than the ending of “Lost.” And even “Lost” resisted the temptation to include a blue French horn in its wrap-up.

'Cabaret' is still powerful, relevant

Written by Gregg Shapiro,
Contributing writer
Thursday, 21 February 2013 17:39

The Oscar-winning film “Cabaret” is finally out on Blu-ray. A multitude of memorable lines and songs from “Cabaret” have left their mark on gay culture.

The film is based on the book “Goodbye to Berlin” by gay writer Christopher Isherwood (“A Single Man”). The book served as the basis for the play “I Am a Camera” and the subsequent Kander and Ebb stage musical “Cabaret.”

A long engagement, a timely documentary

Written by Gregg Shapiro,
Contributing writer
Monday, 11 February 2013 15:20

“Edie & Thea: A Very Long Engagement” is a beautifully rendered story of dancing and romancing that parallels a couple’s coming-out story with that of the LGBT community. The romantic journey of Edie Windsor (from Philadelphia) and Thea Spyer (from Amsterdam) over the course of more than 40 years is uplifting and wondrous.

Now in her 80s, Edie gets the film started by recounting that in 1962 she “couldn’t take it anymore” and called a friend to find out where the lesbians socialized. That night at Portofino’s Restaurant, Edie and Thea met, danced together and, as Thea puts it, their “bodies fit.” Eventually they became a couple.